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Frustrated at the hospital

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by bblakeney, Jun 27, 2011.

  1. bblakeney

    bblakeney Approved members

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    Luckily, being Canadian, cost isn't an issue - but is probably why we have this going on. With cost out of the way our governing folks can think up lots of ways to waste money! :)

    I like the headphones idea - we will try that.

    @valerie k - Both Mom and I have been very clear that we will not send our son to college unless he can manage this himself. I still have to bug him to brush his teeth so I know that I will have to chase him about this as well.
     
  2. Teacups

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    My son (11yo at dx) couldn't test or inject in the hospital. Each kid is different. The CDE taught (encouraged!) him to do his own testing at a follow-up appointment in the first month or so. Injections followed a few months later - close to 5 months I think!

    Sorry you're getting hassled in addition to the news of a second dx.
     
  3. Traci

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    Would a bribe work for your son? Maybe something he's been wanting would be enough to convince him to give it a try. You know your child...you know what he is capable of and when, and you know whether threats will work (like having to stay another night) or whether a bribe would be a better way to get something out of him. Some kids need alone time to work up the courage to do something...others, like my son for example, need a very pretty school nurse encouraging him to check himself.;)

    I also agree with the others to just tell them you are leaving if you have truly had enough and think this might be hurting your son. I've done it...not diabetes related, but yes, I've told drs that we were leaving against their advice when I knew without a doubt that they were keeping my child only because we had excellent insurance. It was fine and they did sign us out once they realized I was serious.
     
  4. 5kids4me

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    Personally, this would not fly with me. I would leave asap, and find a new team if you are allowed to do that.

    Then again, I do not play well with docs that want too much control.
     
  5. Becky Stevens mom

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    Oh yes! I agree completely! They are doctors and CDE's. I understand that they have their little rules and regulations:rolleyes: But this is your child and you know him best. He will probably be much more relaxed at home and ready for diabetes training from his parents and older sibling.

    Wanted to add. I am so very sorry about another d diagnosis:( There are several families in here who have more then one child with type 1
     
  6. sisterbeth43

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    Our situation was a bit different. The only requirement we had was that dd be able to inject herself. She was 13 tho and actually preferred doing it herself. In fact in all the years she has used a pump, no one but herself has ever put a pump site in her--she won't let them. If your son is not yet ready, and you and your wife are the best judge of that, then I would say leave. You know how to take care of him and that is the most important thing. Sorry to hear about the 2nd diagnosis. It must be so hard.
     
  7. Lisa P.

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    Totally ignore me if it doesn't work for you, but I'd sign whatever papers I needed to get out of there as soon as possible.

    I think it's a very bad message for your son to get, that now that he has diabetes strangers get to decide where he spends the night for no good reason.

    So much of diabetes is about how out of control you can feel, both physically and psychologically. I would not want to give my young child the impression that arbitrary outside rules are now going to control the intimate routine of his life. If he doesn't want to test yet and his parents are o.k. with that, no one else has the right to tell him whether he can go home or not.

    In the U.S., we have patients bill of rights posted in most hospitals.You may want to see if you have something similar.

    http://www.patienttalk.info/AHA-Patient_Bill_of_Rights.htm
     
  8. denise3099

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    I haven't read every response, and please feel free to ignore me if this doesn't work for you but here goes: NO NO NO NO NO!!!!!!! :mad:

    Get your kid dressed and take him home. Tell the staff, "I'm sorry, but this will not do. My child is 11 yrs old and I am perfectly capable of caring for him at home and I don't beleive in pushing the responsibility of D care on him before he is ready!" Then pack his stuff and out you go.

    The fact is that if he was dx at 3, they wouldn't make you come in when he turned 11 to make sure he could test himself. My dd was dx at 4. By 5 or 6 she was testing herself. NOT because of her age, but b/c she was used to it by then. Don't push your kid to do more than he is comfortable doing. And don't let anyone push YOU. You'll need to advocate for your child.

    OK, end of lecture. :eek:
     
  9. Flutterby

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    Poor kid has been through a lot.. thats just crazy of the team to want him there until he does a fingre poke.. let him adjust. Obviously you all know what you're doing.. I'd tell them your leaving, that you'll make sure he's OK and he will eventually do his own finger poking.

    Sorry to hear about his dx . :(
     
  10. 2type1s

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    When our 2nd was diagnosed, we didn't even go in the hospital! We talked to the endo from her home, she had us give Zoe her first shot of insulin (some lantus) in her own bed and we were to bring her into the clinic the next morning. She hated finger pricks too, and did better with arm checks. She switched to finger after a month or so. I think you obviously know what's best for your child. You have to remember that even though he has lived with this through his brother, it's still HIS disease now. I think it was worse for us all, because we knew what we were getting into!
     
  11. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    What about using a lancet without the lanicing device(like the old days) Then he doesn't hear the click!
     
  12. Chippy28

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    I am so sorry to hear of your son's diagnosis.

    I, like the others, think it is crazy that the hospital is trying to force your son to do his own BG testing. I was diagnosed at 19 (6 days before I turned 20) and even I had a difficult time with testing. In fact, I did my testing on my arm only for the first 5 years after my diagnosis. Part of that was because no one told me that finger testing tends to be more accurate. The other reason was that I just couldn't get over the fear of the pain that finger testing might bring. I had vivid memories of having my fingers poked during my pediatric physicals with what I thought were torture devices that left huge bruises for days!:eek: Thankfully I stumbled upon this board and discovered multiclix! However, even now, as an adult, there are times when I need to take an extra moment to breathe before I am able to lance my finger. It just isn't part of our human nature to want to hurt ourselves, ya know?

    I hope you are able to knock some sense into the hospital staff. Good luck! :)
     
  13. C6H12O6

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    I think they need to be reminded that it's a hospital not a hotel. A pediatric hospital admission costs MOHLTC literally thousands a day.
     
  14. bblakeney

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    Thanks all for the encouraging and kind words.

    Simon was able to give himself 2 insulin injections yesterday. I am at home with his siblings waiting to hear what the team will come up with today. Doesn't matter what they say we are bringing him home.

    We are also going to look for a new team.
     
  15. DsMom

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    So sorry for this second dx and the extra frustration you are being forced to endure. Your family is in my thoughts and prayers.:cwds:
     
  16. dragonfly

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    You can do that, but what a terrible idea. First, your insurance won't cover a dime of the hospital stay because you left against medical advice (AMA). Second, you will really look bad to the diabetes team and make it harder to work with them in the future.

    I understand that they may have the policy that kids over a certain age should be able to do certain things. Maybe he just isn't ready yet. Drop it for a day or two and then try again.
     
  17. Lisa P.

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    I don't know what the case is in Canada, I assume it is similar, but in the U.S. there are laws and hospital and insurance policies that protect the rights of patients. You certainly will not be denied insurance coverage for care you do receive if you decide not to receive any further care. I appreciate caution, but I have had several cases now in my life with my kids where following medical advise without using my own good judgment would have caused great harm. My dad and mom would both be dead, my diabetic daughter would have gone into DKA before being diagnosed, and my middle daughter would have likely suffered some cognitive damage from mis-prescribed drugs. My best friend who did follow doctor's orders despite her feelings otherwise died in her forties from cancer after being misdiagnosed with a stomach bug and sent home with antibiotics.

    It is a very important general rule, in my opinion, that if your judgment varies from the judgment of the doctors and nurses in charge of your case that you find a solution. That may mean educating yourself until you understand the doctor better, it may mean explaining to the doctor so he gets you better, or it may mean finding new professional care. But I think it is very dangerous for anyone to ever feel they must follow advice they think is harmful just because they want to keep up a good "relationship" with a doctor or because they are worried about insurance paying something. This makes the patient the hostage to the medical team, and coercion never fosters a good relationship.

    My opinion, of course, and formed after some pretty harsh experiences which obviously may not apply to the OP. I hope the OP has worked everything out to her family's satisfaction and all is going well now.
     
  18. hawkeyegirl

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    Untrue. I left AMA after I gave birth to my second child and insurance never knew the diffrence.

    Eh. This isn't a diabetes team I would care much about working with in the future. But even so, I think they'd probably realize that I was in charge of the situation and would be hesitant to try to pull this sort of bullcrap in the future.

    Why should this kid sit around the hospital for days on end over a finger poke? It's silly, and a huge waste of resources.
     
  19. denise3099

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    I get not leaving in a big huff with a big scene. But I would simply say, "I'm afraid I disagree. My family and I have decided that we would like to manage this situation at home. Thank you for your time and attention. Goodbye." Repeat as necessary. And then just leave. You can add as you wait for the elevator, "Yes, I understand how you feel but I'm afraid it's time for us to go now."

    You don't need to have a fit. Anything can be said with a smile that still shows your resolution to sleep in your own bed tonight.

    OP, I sure hope you guys are home. And I really want to add that I really think it's so important NOT to push a newly dx kid, or any D kid, into managing more of his care than he's ready too. Good luck.
     
  20. Christopher

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    If I was in that situation I would not give a flying F how I looked to the "diabetes team". If they were trying to force my child to stay in the hospital over something as small as a finger prick, then I would seriously question their common sense and their ability to work with real people in the real world.

    Really? So it is not bad enough that this poor child has to deal with being diagnosed with a life long chronic disease, but you want him to sit for an extra couple of days in a depressing hospital, all because he is not comfortable lancing his finger?? Really???
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2011

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