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frozen insulin?

Discussion in 'Insulin Pumps' started by Rob, Feb 13, 2007.

  1. Rob

    Rob Approved members

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    Just wondering if anyone has ever had any problems with insulin freezing in the tubing line between the pump and the infusion site. I'm outside frequently in cool temps (often below -20*C which works out to about -5*F if I'm not mistaken) and can be out for hours at a time depending on the situation. The tubing line is always outside my body but i've never had any warnings of a blocked line, nor any symptoms of not having insulin. the pump is always in my pocket, but nearer to the outside of my layers so it's just enough to keep it from going really cold. maby does anyone know the actual freezing temp. of insulin (novorapid)? just something I've been curious about for a while...


    -Rob
     
  2. Hollyb

    Hollyb Approved members

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    I THINK it's the same as water but don't quote me on that!

    With the get-up you've described, I would think the only possibly vulnerable spot might be the tubing between the pump and where it tucks into your pants. One of those elasticized pump packs that holds the pump right against your body under the shirt would for sure protect it from freezing, but might be a bit more hassle to get at when you break for lunch...
     
  3. jilmarie

    jilmarie Approved members

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    The freezing point of insulin is actually slightly lower than water because of freezing point depression. Because insulin is a buffered solution of protein with water as the solvent, the freezing point will be less than the freezing point of pure water.
     
  4. rickst29

    rickst29 Approved members

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    Cut a "button hole" in the back side of a shirt pocket...

    so that you can keep all the tubing (as well as the pump) INSIDE your jacket. Just put the tubing through the hole, with 95% of it inside your shirt.

    This is where I keep my pump. As a bonus (if you're in construction or some other kind of equipment handling activity) it removes ANY chance of catching your tubing on a claw hammer or etc.)

    If the breast pocket has a snap or button or velcro, it'll also keep the pump from falling when you lean over to pick up something off the ground. DW puts a button on the top of the pocket of every shirt which didn't already have one when I bought it... and we look carefully to choose shirts with big pockets and snaps/buttons already there when we shop.
     
    Last edited: Feb 15, 2007
  5. Rob

    Rob Approved members

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    yea, I thought the freezing point was near water. I dunno, I just think it's weird it dosent freeze solid and block the line. Like I said, I'm not to worried about it because it hasent cause any problems yet. I'm just miffed at why it dosent block tubing. maby the pump just pushes it through anyway and it just warms back up once it's closer to the body?

    rickst: it's a good idea except I dont own any shirts with pockets on them, my shirt of choice is usually a sleeveless muscle shirt. And about work, I work as a HD meachnic manufacturing well servicing equipment, so I usually have on a pair of coveralls that the line is under. The problem I have at work is usually when I have something heavy resting on my leg and I slide it off it catches the little connector at the top of the infusion site and tears it out that way, but I dont think there's much I can do about that except keep spares in my locker (besids, it dosent realy bother me enough to move my sites for work days). So i'm pretty much coverd from that end of it.
     

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