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FreeStyle Libre approved for US - already for sale in Canada!

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by wilf, Sep 27, 2017.

  1. wilf

    wilf Approved members

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    Well for all of you still doing finger pokes, here's something to seriously consider.

    The FreeStyle Libre is like a CGM-lite. Easy to use, costs much less than a CGM, no calibration, nothing attached to you except the sensor. The sensor is the size of a dollar coin. It samples blood sugar levels many times an hour, and any time you want a blood sugar reading you just hold the reader (size of a small phone) up close and it does so instantaneously - including through a shirt. You can get a visual display on the reader of what blood sugars have been doing from the time the sensor was applied, can also print out using software.

    It would have been so great to have this when my daughter was younger. Night-time finger pokes would sometimes wake her up. The Libre is much less likely to, as it is not intrusive. You just hold the reader close to the sensor and you have a reading plus everything that's been happening since the last reading.

    It will likewise change the dynamic at schools. With no finger pokes needed, there is no issue with having a child measure in class.

    They say it's for use in adults only - but I would have made the switch for my child in a heart beat if it was available. Not that I'm advising anyone else to - that's just me.

    For many families and people with Type 1 D, this will be life changing. :cwds:

    "The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved the FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System, the first continuous glucose monitoring system that can be used by adult patients to make diabetes treatment decisions without calibration using a blood sample from the fingertip (often referred to as a “fingerstick”).

    The system reduces the need for fingerstick testing by using a small sensor wire inserted below the skin’s surface that continuously measures and monitors glucose levels. Users can determine glucose levels by waving a dedicated, mobile reader above the sensor wire to determine if glucose levels are too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia), and how glucose levels are changing. It is intended for use in people 18 years of age and older with diabetes; after a 12-hour start-up period, it can be worn for up to 10 days."

    https://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm577890.htm
     
  2. Tomdiorio

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    So how is this different than dexcom? Correct me if I'm wrong but dex measure plasma? The libre is measuring actual blood? And it sounds like you have to touch the receiver to the sensor to get a reading, unlike the dex which transfers data via Bluetooth? Either way very exciting for all of us. However, my dexcom stock tanked today!!!
     
  3. MEVsmom

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    I think for my daughter, as a Dexcom user, the Libre would be a step backward for us because of the inability to share the data, or have alarms. She doesn't really get too bothered by the two or three finger pricks a day. The only reason we do three is because the school makes her prick for lunch. Otherwise, we have been dosing off Dex since way before it was approved.

    For someone, who had been fingerpricking exclusively, I think it would be a great tool. I guess if the cost is less than Dexcom for those paying out of pocket or some insurances are more likely to approve it, that is positive as well. It's always nice to have more options available to everyone.
     
  4. kiwikid

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    We love Libre - we would never go back to Dexcom. Its simple, discreet and gives us everything we need.
     
  5. Sprocket

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    Excellent news. Thank you for posting.
     
  6. wilf

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    We measured 8-12 times daily, so the Libre is actually equivalent to or better in cost than finger pokes. And it provides so so much more information.

    For people not yet using CGMs (esp. those with no insurance), the Libre is more accessible and it is transformational. :cwds:
     
  7. Cheetah-cub

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    So even though it is approved for 18 years +, I can buy it for my 14 year-old? Or do we need a prescription?
     
  8. johnyaya

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    The article doesn't mention if the FDA has approved the Libre for dosing (although I'd imagine people will use it that way anyways). If not, it would mean that Libre users would still need to fingerstick before every bolus to be in "compliance".

    Although I personally think "more choice" is better than "no choice", we will stick with Dexcom for now, because the G5 provides automatic and continuous night time warnings to patients and caregivers that the patient is potentially moments away from hospitalization or death. The Libre does not offer such a feature (yet), and until it does, it is a risk we are personally not willing to take.
     
  9. wilf

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    You'll have to see how it plays out. I'd try ordering for yourself and see what happens.
     
  10. swellman

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    Any Idea how it works? How accurate is it?
     
  11. kiwikid

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    We've been using Libre since Nov 14. We find it super simple, discreet and full of accurate information.
     
  12. wilf

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    I'm not big on how things work, as long as they work.

    It works well, as accurate as meter for us. Finger pokes are a thing of the past aside from the odd random check.
     
  13. wilf

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    I can't see many Dexcom users switching. But that's not the target group. It's the much larger universe of people relying on finger pokes, who can't afford or haven't tried the Dexcom and other CGMs.

    We dose off of the readings. Finger pokes are a thing of the past. :cwds:
     
  14. johnyaya

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    Indeed, thanks. My expectation is that a choice of great, cheap, long-term wear CGM products are going to be here within 10 years. It's only a matter of time now where personal CGM and glucose data becomes ubiquitous and easy to obtain. This will be a very good thing.

    Of note : The US-spec Libre apparently has a 12 hour calibration period (which might be FDA mandated only, are Canadian versions of the product different?) you'll most likely need to perform 2-4 sticks while you wait.

    Lastly, I read that software on some Android phones can read the sensor directly - if true, props to Abbott for enabling this, because then it's just a matter of writing a piece of software which can do the work of reading the sensor periodically and send alarm notifications.
     
  15. wilf

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    Calibration period for the Libre in Canada is one hour.
     
  16. Ali

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    Agree, I hope that is what happens also, would allow for lots of possibilities as a stand alone device or in conjunction with a pump down the line. Also means that Dexcom and Medtronic may be pushed to develop a similar product ASAP.
     
  17. mmgirls

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    There is a Nightscout solution, actually a few to turn the Libre into more of a true CGM with alarms and ability to remotely monitor. The biggest issue is range it is not bluetooth, hence the "scan". But Bigfoot has adopted the Libre for its closed loop so I imagine that this is the first iteration in the US. Regarding the 12 hour warm up and 10 day wear, from what I understand by doing this the MARD drops from 11% to 9% compared to the current version in Canada and abroad. Most I here will adopt the Idea of having 2 scanners and start the new one before the old one goes out. ( I did this all the time with G4 to avoid the warmup blackout)
     
  18. payam7777777

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    Hi all,

    I have two questions,

    1. Which European countries could we buy Libre from where they use mg/dl and not mmol?

    2. Lag time.. Is it just as much as the lag time with other CGMSs? Or is it shorter?

    3. :) prescription needed in canada?
     
  19. payam7777777

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    looking for online pharmacies in canada carrying libre.. a little help please? no prescription needed, right?
     
  20. payam7777777

    payam7777777 Approved members

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    Canada seems to be using mmol? Right?/wrong?

    Could i get libre in mg/dl in canada?

    Any other European country with mg/dl?

    Is it safe to buy libre on ebay/amazon?!
     

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