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For those who don't have a school nurse..

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by missmakaliasmomma, Nov 10, 2013.

  1. missmakaliasmomma

    missmakaliasmomma Approved members

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    Is there always some sort of aide if there's not a nurse there M-F all day? What happens if the nurse is only there a few hours a day and a child feels sick outside of the nurse's hours? Just curious really.. I never knew there wasn't always a FT nurse in all schools until reading posts here.
     
  2. mamattorney

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    Our school nurse floats between two schools about a mile and a half apart, so she can pretty much be whereever she's needed most. There is a health aide in each school at all times, so when the nurse is at a particular school that means there are two people in the nurse's office.
     
  3. Wren

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    My daughter was diagnosed last year at age 9. She attends a small private school with no nurse. The secretary also manages the health room and she's our main contact. The school immediately trained all lower school faculty and office staff (15 people). The ADA sent a nurse who did the Safe at School training plus the glucagon certification that is available for non-nurses in our state.

    My daughter has always tested herself in her classroom. She used to use the office phone and now texts if she needs help. At first, a parent came at lunch to verify her calculations and dose. After awhile she called to verify the dose. Now she's on a pump and doesn't call or text unless she needs help.

    There are low kits in every classroom. If she needs more than that, a friend goes with her to the office.

    She has a medical plan, but not a formal 504. We found out recently that the school uses Title 2 funds for professional development. Those are federal funds, and we mentioned to the school that they then were subject to Section 504. They agreed. They haven't begun writing 504s, but they would need to if a parent requested it. They likely would not have to provide an aide, but would have to basic care - bg testing and treat lows. The accommodations have to be "reasonable", and what's "reasonable" depends on many factors.

    If our daughter was younger, we would have needed something different, and I'm not sure what that would have looked like.
     
  4. mmgirls

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    In my school district there is a clinical aide in the health clinic, if that person is out and the School Nurse is not there then there is usually an front office person that has also been trained on the school policies and students with health conditions.

    If they can not handle being down the clinical aide and the school nurse can not be there then the send a Sub. clinical aide. This is what I do< I am a Sub clinical aide in my district, and I have worked everyday that I have wanted to, covering schools health clinics since before school started this year.

    It pretty simple if a kid is too sick to be in class they go home. But they would go home if the Nurse was there too, they would not stay at school just because a school nurse was there.
     
  5. Amy C.

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    I trained the school secretary to help with the daily tasks. If they had any questions, they could call or e-mail me. I also worked very close by, as did my husband. Either one could get to the school quickly, if needed.

    I recall those years as being uneventful.
     
  6. acoppus

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    My 4 year old goes to preschool M,W,F. The nurse is there Tues and Thurs. His teacher, her teacher's aide, the secretary and at least two of the after care staff know how to take care of him. The nurse scheduled the pump company to do hands on training with the pump. Even the principal attended that and other classes from the hospital.
     
  7. missmakaliasmomma

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    It's nice to see that if there's no nurse, there are other people (like secretaries, etc) that step up to the plate.

    What I meant by "what if there's a child who feel s sick but no nurse" is, who calls the shots to send them home? I know our school nurse has to weed out who's really sick and who just wants to go home lol
     
  8. Lexie251

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    Our school has a RN their all the time. We are in constant contact with each other. They have two other subs that know how to take care of her in case she can't be their. Also they have taught a few teachers aids and the teacher how to treat her and give her shots. Kind of funny story her teacher this year told her she is awesome at giving shots since they give them to her goats and cows all the time. You should of seen my daughters face! However our school is really small and we are in the middle on consolidating. There is rumor that we will be going down to one nurse for both schools. However myself and the four other type 1's moms will not let that happen. I also have been fortunate that my daughter is the youngest and the teachers and nurse have already cared for type 1's. They also take care of her the way I want her taken care of not what riley sends. Riley made a change in October and the nurse called me and wanted to know if I wanted the change or not. She also text me her numbers. I love that she is never affraid to ask. Also anytime she is over 250 she has already checked ketones.
     
  9. mmgirls

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    Most have policies for those that get an automatic pass home: ie: temp above 100.4 / vomiting/ diarrhea / skin conditions/ breathing issues.

    In my district, if a kid wants to call home I have to let them. At that point I try to tell the contact person what I am observing, but I do try to run thru fixable things first.

    It is an unfortunate thing that many kids come to the clinic with a stomach ache because they have not eaten or because they are constipated. Others need a break from some type of stressor in their day.

    It is an interesting job. And sometimes I really do hate when a parent chooses to come and pick up a kid just because they called home. I always try to express what I see and tell the parent to talk to their kiddo and then we can talk about what will happen. But it is the parents choice unless It is noted that the child may not go home without administration approval.
     
  10. missmakaliasmomma

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    I've been very lucky too. We have a somewhat smallish school (a lot smaller than what I went to growing up) and she has an RN with her, a school nurse, and multiple subs, only one of those subs though knows about my daughter specifically. We did have an issue one day last week where it seemed like every single nurse called out and they just didn't have enough coverage. My husband went in from 9-11 (did lunch) and I went in at 1- 2:30 and covered snack. It worked out fine, but made me wonder "so if this is ok, does she really need her nurse?" :/

    I've had experience with that. My sister was one of those kids -and still is- that get sick when they start to get stressed. She gets stressed very easily so is sick a lot. Well I say "alot" but it's just more than I get sick. I had to ..pick my daughter up once from school because she had a fever of.. I wanna say 100. something. There's was about 8 other kids in there when I picked her up. What a fun job that must be! Her nurse had to sub in the nurse's office when she didn't come in one day. She told me the next day "If she's not coming into school can you pleaseeee let me know so I don't come either" lol. She said the nurse's office is crazy and in her 1/2 day there, she saw a little over 100 kids.

    The only time my daughter has felt sick was when she was hungry but she will not go to the nurse's office because she's afraid she has to go home everytime she goes now.. I cant keep up with her hunger though, she's seriously always hungry, even 10 minutes after a meal, she could eat a whole meal again.
     
  11. liasmommy2000

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    We have no nurses in our district, in any building, not even part time. The secretaries and aids/para pros take care of health issues.

    We require at least two trained staff members at the school at all time. DD's in middle school so does her own care though staff are trained to deal with severe lows and administer glucagon. In elementary school the two secretaries and a para pro were trained in all aspects of care except site changes/advanced pump issues. They called me for those, and dd when older changed her own site. The last two years they also trained a few of the lunch/recess aides in basic care.

    ETA-in elementary school when it came to non d stuff the secretaries made those decisions. In middle school same thing, though dd has had some minor issues and they worry a bit much and have called me in regards to d/non d things more than needed IMO. Trying to work out those issues.
     
  12. mamattorney

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    This is very funny. It hasn't happened to me this year, but a few times in the last couple years, my son went to the nurse with a stomach ache after lunch and they called me (I guess because they asked him, do you want to call your mom? and he said yes). I felt such pressure to bring him home! The whole time, I'm thinking - he's not sick, he either needs to poop or ate too fast, but I thought, why would they be calling me if they didn't think I should come get him?

    Then I talked to my sister and expressed my frustration (because he wasn't really sick) and she said - you don't have to go get him unless they tell you you do! Just tell the nurse that unless things get worse, he has a fever or is throwing up, have him spend 15 minutes resting at the nurse recommend he try to go to the bathroom and send him back to class. It was like - really . . . I can do that?

    Just a little bit of defense of those parents who pick their kids up when they call! Maybe they don't know any better!
     
  13. MEVsmom

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    Our school nurse is only there part of the day one or two days a week. My daughter's contact is a para professional who also happens to be the one on one for my disabled daughter. I come at lunch to feed my older one and I supervise Maison giving her injection, although the para could do it as long as they called me to verify dosing.

    As for everyday illnesses, the office staff or volunteers handle taking temps, calling parents etc. They have called me before when Maison had a stomach ache. When I got there, I determined it was gas. I rubbed on her belly for a few minutes and sent her back to class. I think they have a certain temp that they send you home at and they do call the parents and feel them out about if the kid may be really sick. For instance, they have put my daughter on the phone to talk to me and sometimes you can determine that they are probably ok and just wanted to escape class or something.
     
  14. Deal

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    Allow me to set the bar nice and low:

    We have no nurses. We have nobody in the school that is allowed to administer insulin. The principle refuses to include our needs in their emergency plans (lockdowns / firedrill planning) They don't assist with facilitating safe busing or include us in any school trip planning.

    We have to keep ds safe in spite of the school.
     
  15. missmakaliasmomma

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    This is the norm in Canada right? I believe someone else from Canada had told me their child's school had no nurses either. At all.
     
  16. kirsteng

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    No public Canadian schools have nurses, to my knowledge.

    They also refuse (at the school board level) to administer glucagon, saying it is too difficult to learn to administer (due to having to mix it). That may be changing, as BC (province) is now enacting legislation through the Ministry of Health that includes glucagon administration. It could take years though for those policies to include all provinces.

    In the meantime, most of us beg teachers and/or aides to unofficially be trained in glucagon administration... most choose not to (no one at my son's school is trained). I just make sure that I'm never far from the school during school hours.

    No teachers or aides can administer insulin - so most kids remain on NPH so as to avoid school hours insulin dosing. Older kids on a pump can be supervised by an EA to press buttons on their own pump, but that's as far as they will go.

    So yeah, the bar in Canada is pretty low! :rolleyes:
     
  17. missmakaliasmomma

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    Jeez... we had a paraplegic (sp?) in my high school who needed a nurse with her because sometimes she would stop breathing. What would canadian schools do? Would they refuse to let that kid in school?
     
  18. kirsteng

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    I think the big problem as far as school staff goes, is with blood or injections here. I've seen kids with major disabilities (including feeding tubes), well cared for by EA's and integrated into the classroom. There seems to be a big fear of blood. In my son's classroom, while the EA can check his bg before snacktime, she cannot even change the pricker on his lancet. I have to go into the classroom every second day to change the lancet and take the old one home with me to dispose.. they don't even want that tiny thing in the garbage can.
     
  19. missmakaliasmomma

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    I get that, but that's what gloves are for!! That makes me so mad. I've poked myself a few times inadvertently but that's also because I'm not too careful. She's my daughter, she has my blood anyway. I'd be a lot more careful if I had to take care of a different child though and it had to do with blood.

    ... They have a sharps bin in the classroom for my daughter's needles and stuff but when I do have to go in, I never remember to put her needles or anything in there lol. hopefully I don't get in trouble! :eek:

    How does your son do on NPH? It didn't work for us but I guess in your situation with school, you really have to be diligent and try very hard to make it work.
     

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