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For anyone who wouldn't mind answering a few questions

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by leahthomas87, Dec 3, 2011.

  1. leahthomas87

    leahthomas87 New Member

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    Hi. I hope you don't mind me forming this thread - I'm not the parent of a diabetic myself (I have type 1 as does my brother) but I'm training to be a nurse and am doing an assignment on how having a teen with diabetes affects family life (I selected this topic).
    If any of you have a few minutes to spare and wouldn't mind answering the following questions to help me on my way it'd be much appreciated. Anyone who doesnt want to answer on a public forum could PM me or I'm happy to give my email address.

    So I'm looking at the effects on family life of having a teen with diabetes - this doesnt have to be people diagnosed as a teen:-

    1. When was your child diagnosed and did you have any previous knowledge of type 1 diabetes?

    2. What were your initial thoughts and fears about the condition?

    3. Has having a teenager with diabetes had any impact on your relationships with other children or your partner?

    4. Do you feel constantly 'on - call' in life just in case anything happens?

    5. What considerations in life do you have to make that other parents probably dont? For example having to get a letter to take on holiday to allow your child to carry needles, or having to be constantly aware of the prescription items needed by your child?

    6. Would you say having a diabetic teen costs you more than it would otherwise financially? (I'm particularly interested in those outside the UK where you may have to pay medical insurance etc? - I dont know anything about this).

    7. Is it difficult to allow your teen a normnal amount of independance? Do you feel as comfortable with them trying alcohol and drugs as you otherwise would do? (I realise parents would rather their children didnt do either but is it worse if your child is diabetic?)

    Any insight you can give me into the life of a parent of a teen diabetic would be much appreciated. If there are any other impacts on your life I've missed out then feel free to add comments on - I'm looking to make my assignment as holistic as possible.
    Thanks,
    Leah.
     
  2. caspi

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    I hope the above helps. :)
     
  3. bnmom

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    Message too short cover text :cwds:
     
  4. nanhsot

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    NOt sure how to do the fancy colors, hope my answers are easy to find...
     
  5. obtainedmist

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    Good luck with the survey!
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2011
  6. KatieSue

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    She takes care of all the day to day herself. I do all the nagging, ordering, records etc.
     
  7. Tamara Gamble

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    Leah, It's just hard sometimes. Even with the most well rounded kids who are doing great, like ours, there are challenges. We try to treat the child first. We realize that everything that we do or don't do will impact their future. The idea is to have a healthy, happy, well rounded, competent child like everyone else. The challenge is doing that with a disease. Teaching them that diabetes is important and must be attended to first, while making them understand that it's just along for the ride is the challenge. I was in a hurry. I hope this helps. Good luck to you.
    Also, parents.....educate them about everything. Knowledge is power. It lessens the fear and brings them hope. It's doable, it just doesn't feel that way upon diagnosis. Huge learning curve. Parents need to be supported.
     
  8. Tamara Gamble

    Tamara Gamble Approved members

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    Leah, It must have been difficult for you at times when perhaps your brother required more attention often times. That is a very big challenge for parents. Rest assured we love our other children just as much. What a great sister you are for doing this project out of love for your sibling. I know that as a parent my heart would feel so blessed by having you as my daughter. Thank you for raising awareness among your peers. The greatest instructor that I have had to date was one who's brother had type 1. Had is right. He has had a pancreas and kidney transplant and is doing beautifully. One of my favorite CDE's brother has type 1 the other has it herself. You are truly doing us a great service as you proceed with your project and studies.
    Have a Blessed Christmas and New year! Again, thank you! ~ Tami
     
  9. keanna's momma

    keanna's momma Approved members

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    I think that one this to note that it is harded on children being a teen diagnosed then it is for a child that has grown up with diabetes. My daughter is 7 months post diagnosis and at 14 is having a real hard time dealing with the diabetes.
     
  10. Lee

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    Honestly, for me, the most difficult part is balancing good D care with independence. I would never expect a 13 year old to remember every aspect of D care, but she HAS to know. I HAVE to trust her to do it at a friend's house or on the bus to the game.
     
  11. Mrs Puff

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    1. When was your child diagnosed and did you have any previous knowledge of type 1 diabetes?

    DS 14 was diagnosed one year ago. I was clueless regarding Type 1 diabetes. I had to google diabetic ketoacidosis in the hospital because I couldn't grasp what the doctors were saying.

    2. What were your initial thoughts and fears about the condition?

    Hypoglycemic episodes were a concern


    3. Has having a teenager with diabetes had any impact on your relationships with other children or your partner?

    Yes, DD 11 gets a little chapped sometimes that I will fix her brother a pb sandwich but I will tell her to make her own. She sees it as special treatment even though I remind her I do it because I have to measure everything.

    4. Do you feel constantly 'on - call' in life just in case anything happens? Yes

    5. What considerations in life do you have to make that other parents probably dont? For example having to get a letter to take on holiday to allow your child to carry needles, or having to be constantly aware of the prescription items needed by your child?

    I always have to think about making sure his "betes" bag is stocked and not left behind. I have to think about his food needs when we go somewhere. If we are going to a pot-luck or someone's house for dinner, I have to discuss all the food options with DS and then guesstimate carbs.

    6. Would you say having a diabetic teen costs you more than it would otherwise financially? (I'm particularly interested in those outside the UK where you may have to pay medical insurance etc? - I dont know anything about this).

    We had to sign up for government assistance to pay for medical expenses. When I finish school and get my RN license, we wont qualify. I imagine a very large chunk of my income will go to pay for diabetes expenses.

    7. Is it difficult to allow your teen a normnal amount of independance? Do you feel as comfortable with them trying alcohol and drugs as you otherwise would do? (I realise parents would rather their children didnt do either but is it worse if your child is diabetic?)

    I try to not limit him in anyway. I will however, strongly discourage alcohol due to the dangers of his condition, even though I do occasionally have wine or beer.

    Any insight you can give me into the life of a parent of a teen diabetic would be much appreciated. If there are any other impacts on your life I've missed out then feel free to add comments on - I'm looking to make my assignment as holistic as possible.
    Thanks,
    Leah.[/QUOTE]
     
  12. alismom

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    1. When was your child diagnosed and did you have any previous knowledge of type 1 diabetes?

    At 12 years old, December of 7th grade.
    2. What were your initial thoughts and fears about the condition?

    I was terrified that I would "miss" something. I was worried about complications in the future. I READ constantly.

    3. Has having a teenager with diabetes had any impact on your relationships with other children or your partner?

    Not really, lack of sleep makes me cranky at times, but that's it.

    4. Do you feel constantly 'on - call' in life just in case anything happens?

    Constantly on call, YES. Not literally, but always in a state of awareness.

    5. What considerations in life do you have to make that other parents probably dont? For example having to get a letter to take on holiday to allow your child to carry needles, or having to be constantly aware of the prescription items needed by your child?

    School, testing, constantly carrying snacks and pumps/supplies, worry, travel, friends, alcohol

    6. Would you say having a diabetic teen costs you more than it would otherwise financially? (I'm particularly interested in those outside the UK where you may have to pay medical insurance etc? - I dont know anything about this).

    Not really

    7. Is it difficult to allow your teen a normnal amount of independance? Do you feel as comfortable with them trying alcohol and drugs as you otherwise would do? (I realise parents would rather their children didnt do either but is it worse if your child is diabetic?)

    I worry more absolutely. I didn't feel comfortable with any of my underage children trying drugs or alcohol and I feel the same now. The interaction between T1 and these factors makes me more concerned.
     
  13. pianoplayer4

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    I hope its ok that I did this even though i'm not a parent of a teen with d,(I'm a teen with d) if not, sorry.
     
  14. Joretta

    Joretta Approved members

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    goodluck

    1. When was your child diagnosed and did you have any previous knowledge of type 1 diabetes?
    At age 12. Yes I had some achild I had y first year teaching, a classmate of my daughter at age 5, and PE coach who was a stand in Dad for my daughter at afather daughter event when she was 7.

    2. What were your initial thoughts and fears about the condition?
    I'm not sure - costs for meds, how she would cope.

    3. Has having a teenager with diabetes had any impact on your relationships with other children or your partner?
    I'm a single parent and she is my only child. But I have lost all of my personal social life.

    4. Do you feel constantly 'on - call' in life just in case anything happens? I do and I am. There is no one else to run help her or to be at school events just in case.

    5. What considerations in life do you have to make that other parents probably dont? For example having to get a letter to take on holiday to allow your child to carry needles, or having to be constantly aware of the prescription items needed by your child? I feel like I went backward. I have to carry a bag everywhere we go just in case she forgot something or wants a break.

    6. Would you say having a diabetic teen costs you more than it would otherwise financially? (I'm particularly interested in those outside the UK where yo u may have to pay medical insurance etc? - I dont know anything about this). Yes, because of medical costs and time from work. It took a year to work out the new expenses and during this as a single parent I lost my home because she was more important. Luckly the job survives just not at the normal income.

    7. Is it difficult to allow your teen a normnal amount of independance? Do you feel as comfortable with them trying alcohol and drugs as you otherwise would do? (I realise parents would rather their children didnt do either but is it worse if your child is diabetic?) Yes, she is lacking independence she was well on her way to having. I am ten times more terrified of her experimenting.

    Most of the time as a single parent I feel trapped. I get three choices everyday an angry teen( from my overseeing her care), sleep deprived (from either fixing the sick child who was sure she new more than me or from monitoring from letting her try to be like her friends), and a fighting fear of what everything is doing to her well being.

    Any insight you can give me into the life of a parent of a teen diabetic would be much appreciated. If there are any other impacts on your life I've missed out then feel free to add comments on - I'm looking to make my assignment as holistic as possible.
    Thanks,
    Leah.[/QUOTE]
     
  15. BCmom

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    1. When was your child diagnosed and did you have any previous knowledge of type 1 diabetes?
    NO.

    2. What were your initial thoughts and fears about the condition?
    That she would die young.

    3. Has having a teenager with diabetes had any impact on your relationships with other children or your partner? No, having teenagers has though! I have 3 of them only one has diabetes.

    4. Do you feel constantly 'on - call' in life just in case anything happens?
    I am always on call but don't think about it anymore. It has been almost 3 years since diagnosis. And now we are all "ON call" for her

    5. What considerations in life do you have to make that other parents probably dont? For example having to get a letter to take on holiday to allow your child to carry needles, or having to be constantly aware of the prescription items needed by your child?

    The number one thing on every shopping trip is to check her diabetes supplies to see if she needs anything. Sleep overs always have to be 'planned'. Somethings are very complicated like backpacking. And I won't let her go winter camping. The only thing I have said NO to.

    6. Would you say having a diabetic teen costs you more than it would otherwise financially? (I'm particularly interested in those outside the UK where you may have to pay medical insurance etc? - I dont know anything about this).
    YES!

    7. Is it difficult to allow your teen a normnal amount of independance? Do you feel as comfortable with them trying alcohol and drugs as you otherwise would do? (I realise parents would rather their children didnt do either but is it worse if your child is diabetic?)
    I am terrified by the thought. But I have allowed her as much independence as possible. Accomodating her wishes as much as possible, because the psychological repercussions if I didn't could be serious.
    Foe instance she goes camping, on school trips etc on her own as long as cell phone contact is possible.
     
  16. MAsDad

    MAsDad Approved members

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    QUOTE=leahthomas87;774676]Hi. I hope you don't mind me forming this thread - I'm not the parent of a diabetic myself (I have type 1 as does my brother) but I'm training to be a nurse and am doing an assignment on how having a teen with diabetes affects family life (I selected this topic).
    If any of you have a few minutes to spare and wouldn't mind answering the following questions to help me on my way it'd be much appreciated. Anyone who doesnt want to answer on a public forum could PM me or I'm happy to give my email address.

    So I'm looking at the effects on family life of having a teen with diabetes - this doesnt have to be people diagnosed as a teen:-

    1. When was your child diagnosed and did you have any previous knowledge of type 1 diabetes?
    She was diagnosed in February 2010 at age 13. My father is also a T1D, diagnosed in 1937 at age 2. He will celebrate his 77th birthday next month.
    2. What were your initial thoughts and fears about the condition?
    My initial thoughts at her diagnosis were like everyone else. I was in a panic since she?d gone into diabetic ketoacidosis and was hospitalized. I felt like I should have recognized the symptoms leading up to that morning. I grew up with a T1D father so I knew the drill about counting carbs, metering, etc.
    3. Has having a teenager with diabetes had any impact on your relationships with other children or your partner?
    Yes, I tend to be more vocal and active in showing my love and concern for both of our daughters. I feel like I did a good job of this prior to the diagnosis, but now I feel a certain additional drive inside prompting me to make sure each knows how precious she is to me and their mother. My wife and I certainly share the responsibilities for health insurance, managing supplies, doctors appointments, our daughter?s equipment and supplies she carries with her, etc. So we are naturally pretty in sync with each other on that.
    4. Do you feel constantly 'on - call' in life just in case anything happens?
    I do feel this way, but it is not a negative thing with me. DD has an iPhone and is always in touch, her school is terrific, and she really manages her diabetes well. She plays soccer on the JV and Varsity teams at her highschool, travels with the team, and is playing some volleyball this summer.
    5. What considerations in life do you have to make that other parents probably dont? For example having to get a letter to take on holiday to allow your child to carry needles, or having to be constantly aware of the prescription items needed by your child?
    Yes we have to manage insurance and diabetes supplies, insulin and such that non-D parents don?t. But, that?s a simple thing. My brother has a daughter with moderate to severe Autism, she?s barely able to make sentences at age 13. Dealing with Diabetes is a Saturday picnic in comparison. So It is all relative. All parents worry about their kids?at least the should.
    6. Would you say having a diabetic teen costs you more than it would otherwise financially? (I'm particularly interested in those outside the UK where you may have to pay medical insurance etc? - I dont know anything about this).
    Yes. Diabetes, like any other disease is more costly than not having that disease. But, insurance helps a lot and getting the right combination of supplies and prescriptions with your insurance carrier is key. We are on the Omnipod (love it) and that is a handful to manage at first. We still keep a supply of needles and stuff for emergencies.
    7. Is it difficult to allow your teen a normnal amount of independance? Do you feel as comfortable with them trying alcohol and drugs as you otherwise would do? (I realise parents would rather their children didnt do either but is it worse if your child is diabetic?)
    This is a tricky thing, adolescence and independence. Adding a medical condition like diabetes just exacerbates the problem. We allow a normal (for us) amount of independence based on daughter?s performance in school and overall behavior. Just as we would for our younger non-D daughter when she gets older, we require certain behaviors (grades, temperament, attitude, etc.) in order to receive certain independence. She doesn?t drive yet, but she attends school functions (social, academic and athletic) as well as spends time with friends, attends parties and dances, movies, the usual. We have a firm policy on drug and alcohol use and so far she has not violated that. Drug and alcohol use is bad enough for children without diabetes, and could be even deadlier with diabetes, and we talk about this openly.
    Any insight you can give me into the life of a parent of a teen diabetic would be much appreciated. If there are any other impacts on your life I've missed out then feel free to add comments on - I'm looking to make my assignment as holistic as possible.
    Right now our DD is in our house, a rising sophomore in school and under our care all the time. All this changes when in 3 years she leaves for college. That is when I think DD is going to have some problems with blood sugar monitoring, lows and highs, probably some alcohol related complications with her bg?s. I hope not, but I?d be na?ve to think otherwise. So between now and when she leaves for college and life away from home we are doubling our efforts to help her be self-sufficient in managing her diabetes, correcting lows and highs on her own, taking care of herself.
    Thanks,
    Leah.[/QUOTE]
     
  17. fdlafon

    fdlafon Approved members

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    I personally NEVER limit Jordan's activities and blame diabetes. We never use his diabetes as a crutch or an excuse. This is the hand we were dealt, and we do the best we can every day, minute to minute. It's ahrd enough being a teenager and trying to find your way. We take the good with the bad and move on, trying to figure out the Why's?!?
     

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