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Food issues with toddler

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Rusty, Nov 5, 2008.

  1. Rusty

    Rusty Approved members

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    I have a 23 month old type 1 son who is begining to have some food issues. Latley he has be wanting food and throwing tantrums when he dont get it. Everything will be going fine then all of a sudden he will get it in his head that he wants something, Mostly things like snacks and cereal, cereal ect. He know where these things are and will go and point and begin to get very upset when he cant have any and wont give up. I try to take him somewhere else and get his mind of it but he wont forget and will go right back. I know he can have snacks and he does get them but he cannot have them anytime he wants. I dont have problems with tantrums in any other situations like i have been latley with food. Any other parents out there with toddlers that may have this problem that may have some advise on how they have delt with this would be helpfull. I really feel bad for him, it can be very fustrating for both of us when this happens. I really am not sure what is the best way for me to handle this. Its not like i can explain why he cannot have these things because he diabetes as he is to young to understand. If anyone has any tips or advise it would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. frizzyrazzy

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    I think you have a very normal 23 month old baby. :) :) he wants what he wants when he wants it. Take diabetes out of the equation for a minute and just deal with the fact that he's always hungry. Is he getting enough to eat at his meals? I know my own just over 2 year old nephew is notorious for not eating meals and then wanting nothing but snacks until the next meal, which he won't eat.. and it goes on and on. You could try with healthier snacks instead - when he's trying for cereal (and don't' they all love their cheerios??) you could offer him some carrot sticks. But as long as he's filling up at his meals, and as long as he is getting a between meal snack then you're just going to have to spend the next 6 months or so dodging the snack monster. :) This is one of those times where luckily it's got nothing to do with D. ;)
     
  3. joy orz

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    Does your doctor have any suggestions? Maybe you could change his treatment plan to have more flexibility in his diet? Have you considered the pump?

    Ava is two as well, so I know how toddlers love to eat. Generally, she does better if I give her about 4 hours between carbs, but we've been known to break that rule of thumb when the numbers aren't too high. Or if she's really hungry and running around alot.

    We always have "carb free" food on hand when she's hungry, I'll offer up a meatball or an avacado. Sometimes I've offered broccoli in broth and she's taken me up on it but that's rare :D

    She does love protein and avacado though, and that's usually enough to fill her up. She also get's "bubbly water." as a special treat. It's just seltzer no carbs, but the bubbles make her laugh and it distracts from the snack bar she's asking for. :p

    I'd run this question by the nutritionist and see if maybe they can tweak your insulin ratios to be able to cover more carbs if he really wants it. We were told they need carbs at this age for brain development.
     
  4. AlisonKS

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    maybe he needs to eat more at his regular meals? Tony just had a growth spurt and for awhile he was eating 60 carbs at lunch:eek: It felt weird giving him so much insulin, but now he's back to normal. We give him sugar free jello or pickles if he's still hungry between meals and snacks.
     
  5. Nancy in VA

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    I agree with the PP who said take diabetes out of the equation. I've never been big on letting my kids graze all the time. We have set meal times and certain times I will allow snacks, but none of mine of any age can just go and get any food any time they want.

    That included my 2 year old when she was diagnosed as well as my current 11 year old (who I am ALWAYS fighting over food with because I SWEAR she asks for a snack because the clock says its 3pm!)
     
  6. Rusty

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    He gets plenty to eat at meals, he is a very good eater and will eat almost anything. I do have plenty of carb free snacks that he eats also. I really dont think its a hunger thing. He knows that some things taste much better than others and thats why he wants it, not because he is hungy. I kinda agree with the post about dealing with the snack monsters. He is probrably trying to test his limits and mine. Hopefully he will learn and this will pass before to long.
     
  7. frizzyrazzy

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    as long as he's eating healthy and plenty at meals, then it does just sound like typical toddler behavior.

    Another trick I just remembered, we had a rule in our house (still do actualyl) that all food is eaten at the kitchen table. This was helpful for toddlers who would happily wander around with a bowl of cheerios all day long. If he had to sit while eating he was less likely to want a snack out of boredome. If he was really actually hungry then he would usually sit nicely and eat what he needed to fill him up. You could try this with your son too.
     
  8. Caydens_Mommy

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    Rusty, Cayden is still very much like this.. I think it is just a typical thing for the younger kids.. It is hard to have them wanting something to eat and not being able to let them have it.. I will say this though, since being on the pump I have felt more comfortable with letting him snack pretty much when he wants to.. I never want to not allow him to have food.. I hope that you can figure out what will work best for you and London..
     
  9. BozziesMom

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    I think it's just a normal phase too. I have another post on here regards tantrums. This was the source of last night's tantrum. We were in the car. We had string cheese, we had some lunch meat - to snack on for the drive. He wanted apple sauce. And ONLY apple sauce. He had a screaming sh*t fit... :)

    My other 3 kids did this too. Non D. All well past it now.
     
  10. Rusty

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    Thanks for the feedback. It can be very hard sometimes. I usally always have our meals together so he dont feel like he is being left out. There has been some times when he has caught me grabing a quick bite out of frig. He gives me such a look and i feel so bad for him sometimes. Hopefully in a year or so i will be able to get him on a pump, that is my goal.
     
  11. Andy'sMom

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    We went through this as well and still go through it. I feel your frustration. We actually just changed insulin for breakfast so Andy can now choose what he wants (within reason). All other meals are tied to a set # of carbs and if he wants something outside of same, then it's a fight. Distraction works really well for us, but it's never easy. Good luck!
     
  12. XMumofType1aged8X

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    Jack was just like this!! He would run & point to the cupboards & have a tantrum if he didnt get what he wanted, so i did exactly as previously mentioned & gave him more food at his main meals & more or less straight away he stopped asking!!
     

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