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First demonstration of insulin production in patients from a stem cell-derived islet replacement the

Discussion in 'Research' started by fishface326, Oct 21, 2019.

  1. fishface326

    fishface326 Approved members

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    https://www.prnewswire.com/news-rel...cell--gene-meeting-on-the-mesa-300930345.html

    "While optimization of the procedure is continuing, preliminary data show that implanted cells, when effectively engrafted, are capable of producing circulating C-peptide, a biomarker for insulin, in patients with type 1 diabetes. "

    "The entry criteria of the study require patients to be C-peptide-negative upon enrollment. Previous histological data have shown that, after PEC-01 cells are implanted under the skin and when properly engrafted, they can mature into functional beta cells and other cells of the islet that are responsible for controlling blood glucose levels.

    Laikind concluded, "ViaCyte has achieved a number of firsts in this field. Now with the first demonstration of insulin production in patients who have received PEC-Direct, we are confident we can be the first to deliver an effective stem cell-derived islet replacement therapy for type 1 diabetes."
     
  2. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

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    To put this in perspective, following is an excerpt from a recent post written by Joshua Levy:

    “Unsuccessful Phase-I Clinical Trial of Beta-O2's Encapsulated Beta Cells

    Encapsulated beta cells are implanted devices. The encapsulation coating allows blood sugar in, and insulin out, but does not allow the body's immune system to attack the beta cells. It also allows nutrients in and waste products out. This allows the beta cells to naturally grow and to react to the body's sugar by generating insulin which goes into the body's blood system. Meanwhile, the body's autoimmune attack cannot target these beta cells, and you don't need to take any immunosuppressive drugs (as you would for a normal beta cell transplantation). I previously blogged about this trial here:
    https://cureresearch4type1diabetes.blogspot.com/2014/11/beta-o2-starts-phase-i-trial-and-update.html

    Unfortunately, they published unsuccessful results last year. To quote their abstract:

    Implantation of the βAir device was safe and successfully prevented immunization and rejection of the transplanted tissue. However, although beta cells survived in the device, only minute levels of circulating C-peptide were observed with no impact on metabolic control.”
     
  3. fishface326

    fishface326 Approved members

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    Not sure I understand the perspective - that post was from 2014, and a completely different company?
     

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