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first day of school, and they forgot he has diabetes!

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by 3js, Sep 6, 2007.

  1. 3js

    3js Approved members

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    Yesterday was the first day of school. We have a careplan in place from last May, and the Principal, gym teachers,class teacher, secretary, and a couple of aides were trained (over 1hr) at that time by the community health nurse- we don`t have a school nurse.

    All of his supplies were in the classroom. But they FORGOT he is diabetic. They didn`t mention moving him to a teacher for the week who is new to the school. They didn`t tell the Vice Principal who is new to the school.

    At lunchtime, no one came to monitor my son while he takes his bg. So he forgot to do it at all- he`s 10.:rolleyes:

    And right before lunch, the VP sent his class on an unplanned run- for which he had no extra food.

    I tested him at 3:30 pm and he was 4.9- not exactly an emergency, but at the mall once he dropped from the 5`s to the 3`s in about 15minutes.


    I found out about all of this by chance after school, and gave the office a call. So the community health nurse is going back to retrain everyone!

    I just can`t believe it! How can a whole school forget- there are less than 200 students.
     
  2. Abby-Dabby-Doo

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    I mean NO disrespect by this... but you didn't have a meeting, talk with his teacher, or have a refresher in how to calculate any of his dosage?! Your son forgot to check his blood sugar all day at school or just before he ate lunch?
     
  3. Flutterby

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    I would be fuming.. that is completely and totally unexceptable!!!! they are so lucky that something serious didn't happen.. I'd be knocking on their door early early tomorrow morning and watch over them to make sure everyone 'gets' it..

    good grief!
     
  4. Beach bum

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    For this very reason our school nurse/teachers don't want to meet with us until the day before school starts. This way if there are any last minute changes, either with us or with school staff, nothing falls through the cracks.

    I would request a meeting with the teacher asap so that you can go over how your child reacts in certain situations. I would ask the PE teach to sit in, or have a copy of what you want, printed up for him also. I would also sit down with your son and let him know that while he isn't at fault for this, he probably should have gone to the office and had him call you. Was he at least able to check his bg? Was he able to give himself insulin or does someone have to do it for him?

    Best of luck in getting this ironed out.
     
  5. 3js

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    He is on nph, so he does not take insulin at school, but must eat. And he MUST have food for extra activity (which is at school). He has insulin in his bag in case of earthquake- which he can administer.

    He didn`t check the whole day at school. It was arranged that he call (his own cell phone) for instructions on extra activity.

    It was supposed to be a different teacher (who he had last year), who has been trained, and who has the supplies in her class. No one told me that he was being moved when he got to school, and the principal did not say there was new staff.

    Everything was in place:confused:I didn`t call the school yesterday am, because we arranged everything for the first day in June. I guess I was naive.

    I am a real newbie! geesh...well i know now, lol. Thankfully nothing bad happened. I guess I should be happy for that!
     
    Last edited: Sep 6, 2007
  6. Abby-Dabby-Doo

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    No, no, no, no, no, no

    You are not a newbie.
    Number one I misread your post, I didn't understand about having the same teacher as last year, and switching to a new teacher. That thrown in changes quit a bit of what you would have done differently. Not your fault.
    The summer is a long time for people who DON'T take care of D 24/365 to remember a blood check.

    I really feel bad, I hate typing on here sometimes for fear that my comments would be taken out of context.

    I would think SOMEONE would remember he has D. IMO I would speak to your son about not checking his blood sugar, and not calling you about the extra activity. I think responsibility is lacking both ways.

    I'm glad he's okay! :eek:
     
  7. 3js

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    Nooo , I wasn`t offended- please don`t worry, lol. I AM a newbie, because I haven`t been through the first day of school before. Trust me, I will be GOING there in the am next year!

    You know, I just realized something REALLY good has come out of this. At the training in May, the principal balked at having an aide monitor him. And that was 2wks post dx, and he had been hospitalized.

    So I really expected a hassle this year. Well, I think it is pretty clear that he is NOT ready to take over responsibility for his d-care at school.
     
  8. Momof4gr8kids

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    I am glad you are able to see the positives. I am so sorry that you guys had to go through this. I like the idea of the cell phone. We are going to have to look into doing that.
     
  9. 3js

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    I got it in the summer so that he could go to buy a treat and call with the carbs, or go to the park with his friends. But it is turning out to be really useful at school. The VP even thought it was a good idea.:)

    Plus the day my son got it, he said it made having d ok to get his own phone. Who can resist that, lol.
     
  10. Amy C.

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    Consider this a lesson learned: teacher training must be done immediately before school starts. Training in advance is not necessarily useful. The staff has a lot to think about. I am not surprised they forgot.
     
  11. 1luckymom

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    I definitely agree that teachers need to be trained, and I am a teacher myself. I knew nothing before my daughter was dxd. And to think I had a diabetic one year. I was so lucky nothing happened!

    This year my daughter is in 7th grade. I am trying to get her to take responsibility as some of you have mentioned in this thread. Her teacher is passing out candy each time a student raises their hand and answers correctly! My daughter won't raise her hand because she doesn't want to deal with the candy!:mad: If she doesn't get this under control by next week (Back to School Night) I will step in. I guess my situation is not as severe as the original post but I just thought it kind of fit in with teachers and their lack of knowledge! Go figure!:p
     
  12. Twinklet

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    Well, things turned out OK and lessons learned. I think the first day of school is stressful for the staff AND students. My daughter is almost 10 years old occasionally forgets to test her BG before lunch or snack. It happens.

    This is also a reminder to me that others often don't see T1D as a "serious" disease. The kid looks OK, doesn't have any outward appearances that something is "wrong" and everyone forgets, or thinks s/he is fine, just gets a few shots a day. It is frustrating to explain to others just how much work goes into managing this disease when my child looks and acts like any other kid.
     
  13. thebestnest5

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    I am so glad he's OK. Yikes! Sorry you had to go through that!:cwds:

    Sad to say that this "lesson learned" also can be loosely applied to ER docs, other docs, nurses, and hospital staff. There is so much ignorance surrounding T1D; it's scary.
     
  14. Emma'sDad

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    Last week, DW was busy meeting with principal, VP, teachers with the Diabetic Nurse. This week went pretty smoothly. (Except for the blood shed after needle and going from 11.7 to 2.5 in less than an hour from morning snack to lunch.)

    My question to you is... If he went all day without checking BG, having lunch without needle... How was he still below 10??? Emma's meter would plainly have said HI.
     
  15. 3js

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    Emma`s dad, he`s on nph/nr, and no needle after bkfst until dinner, then bedtime. So I dose for am bg, and the food/activity I expect him to have until he gets home.

    While he`s at school, the big concern is then that he will go low, which he doesn`t always feel.

    So he`s gotta test, and make sure he eats for any extra activity (I pack labelled snacks and he`s to call).

    1luckymom, I think I would like your situation less. I hope it gets worked out- it doesn`t sound very fair to your daughter at all!

    The staff (other than the principal) are awesome. I guess even though I know there are worse things, his d IS kind of the forefront for me, and I expected everyone else to think the same, lol. NOT very realistic. I guess it was a good wake up call to plan better.

    The community healthcare nurse had been trying to reack me all of August, but had the wrong #, lol. So when I called her, she said that everything needs redoing EVERY August before school starts- not to rely on the Principal to carry out things from last year. And that staff need to be retrained every Sept.:eek:
     

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