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Feeling low blood sugar

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by rakgyk, Jun 7, 2013.

  1. rakgyk

    rakgyk Approved members

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    Gavin is only 6 but he knows when he's running low. When he's low, he tells me he feels shaky and he's told the school nurse he can't feel his legs. I asked his endo about it once and she said not to worry. He can also feel low when he's high and drops to a more normal number too fast. The problem is, he's been going to the nurses office about 4 or 5 times a day. Normally he would go twice, to test his blood sugar before lunch then right aft he's done eating to give him novolog. He's been going about 4 or 5 times not including those 2 times. I can't tell him to stop going too much because he might actually be low, and sometimes he is. I really like the school nurse, but she is also getting concerned why he keeps feeling like he's low.
     
  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Very common. :cwds:

    Sometimes it's about feeling low, or feeling bgs "moving", sometimes it's about availing one's self of the liberty to walk out of class and go to the nurse :rolleyes:, but in all the discussions we've had here about 5-7 year olds doing this, and many do, they all seem to outgrow it. It helps if the nurse is nice and prompt and warmly sends them right back.:cwds:

    It's a phase. If you and the nurse agree to a plan of no frills office visits it will most likely fade.
     
  3. Beach bum

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    We experienced this problem. There were two issues at hand. The first was that she really was becoming aware of her lows, but she was also becoming aware of her BG's moving. So if she was dropping from say 110 to 90, she felt it and it made her nervous. She is now at the age where she just checks herself or her CGM, but at your child's age, it really is perfectly normal. The second problem was that the health office staff was WAY too nice:) The aide is so sweet, but she would have her sit in her lap, give her a hug while she tested. In 3rd grade she was much farther from the nurse, so we changed approach and had the nurse come to her whenever possible and there happened to be a classroom aide that year and he would oversee BG tests (2 T1 kids in class). When she did go to the office, it was strictly business from all.

    It's a phase, it will pass. You are right though, you don't want to discount his feelings, it is an important part of dealing with diabetes.
     
  4. rakgyk

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    The nurse is sometimes a little too nice! I will speak to her today if he goes to her feeling low.
     
  5. Helenmomofsporty13yearold

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    At only 6, I doubt that he is going low for any reason other than feeling low or being nervous about going low. In middle school, they will fake it to get out of class when they are bored. I would be glad he is going and testing.
     
  6. tammy82

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    I agree with above poster, I doubt he is faking it to get out of class at that age. My daughter is really good at feeling her lows. She will tell me her "legs are tired" and most of the time she is right her BS is low or dropping. The scary thing is when they are sitting in class and cant feel it from sitting too long sometimes. Sometimes is easier for my daughter to feel when she is up and moving around.
     
  7. rakgyk

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    He's not leaving class just to leave. He loves school and doesn't want to miss class, but he says he feels shaky several times a day. There was one day last week the nurse was out, and the gym teacher took over for his care that day (she's also a RN and agreed to care for him when the nurse is out). The only times he went to her was to be tested and for his shot. He didn't feel low that day. I'd rather him go to her a few times a day and catch when he's low instead of ignoring it and pass out.
     
  8. KatieSue

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    My daughter would often feel low and shakey, on PE days when they had to run a mile :rolleyes: The nurse always checked her but rolleyed her a bit as well. But she was older. I'd still rather have her check or be checked by the nurse than not.

    Mysteriously once the mile running was over it was a quick recovery.

    But she does sometimes feel off and will test and not be out of range. I do think it's because she's either rising or falling rapidly and can feel it.
     
  9. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Not suggesting he ignore it or be dissuaded from going, but when he has been going frequently what sort of readings is the nurse seeing?
     
  10. Jaredsmom

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    Jared worried about going low and would run his bg a little high because of it. he had had some bad lows. Getting a Dexcom really helped with this. I think it could help you son as well.
     
  11. greenpalm

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    We've had a few false lows, and we homeschool. There were a bunch for a while, I think she's getting the hang of knowing the difference between dropping, and low. But she also has a Dexcom, and it's lovely! At the very least we can see when she's falling.
     
  12. SandiT

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    I think you've gotten great suggestions to ask the nurse to keep it quick, efficient, and professional. Additionally, however, I would tell her that he's learning his body's language right now, and let's encourage that.

    My daughter doesn't feel hers, so I think that you're fortunate that he feels it and notices it. I wouldn't do anything at all to discourage that, and I'd tell the nurse that you prefer he be over-tested, than under-tested.

    Also offer her the choice of asking him, "Let's take an inventory, how does your body feel right now?"

    I think that keeping track of his answers may help her to help him notice differences in "moving down" and "being truly low". Perhaps giving her a task that makes her feel more involved and less interrupted, could assist in lowering her sense of "why do I have to do this all the time... he's usually fine!"

    The school nurse is an important part of his care, so engaging her more in some way might go a long way towards improving relations with her.

    Just a thought. :)
     

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