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feeling like a lousy pancreas

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by kail, Jan 9, 2015.

  1. jenm999

    jenm999 Approved members

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    I only read the last few posts but have you considered CGM? (If you already addressed this I apologize). We got ours while still MDI and it definitely restored a good deal of sanity to our household. Yes, it's a great tool for setting variable basals on a pump, but it's also great just to see real-time how your choices affect BG. And I know some warn against relying on it at night, but we use it to alarm us of impending lows so we can get some sleep.
     
  2. BarbDwyer

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    We do MDI. We are far from perfect and are new. His numbers are not right (way to many highs right now) and it is hard to get it worked out because - oppositional know it all teenager.

    With that disclaimer - We never correct at 2hrs. If at three hours he is high we'll do a correction but back off it a bit - maybe three quarters of what the correction factor says. If we have a meal planned w/in an hour it will be a major throw down to get him to correct the high before he eats because he wants to do just one shot. I only go there if the high is quite high. There are so many compromises regarding things I'd rather do but he refuses. Some things I insist on but every hill can't be the one to die on. It would make life unbearable and he'll dig in his heals.

    He'd prefer to be high than low and I get his reasons. I empathize even if I can't fully understand but the high's weigh so heavy on this mama.
     
  3. aprilodell

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    A little high for these guys are less scary than lows, they also are not aware of long term consequences and there is no way you can change that teenage brain. my practice has not wanted us to correct for at least 3-4 hours after the last one. Our goals are to be in range only 50% of the time. I think we are good with that. I think I am a little different in that I have to make my son have an afternoon snack, to keep him a little higher so he does not go low at dinner o before I get home from work. The pattern we see is that he is under 150 at lunch (so no correction needed), then about 200-220 when he gets home from school at 3, he has a 15-20g uncovered snack and then at 530 he is back in range.
     
  4. Portabella

    Portabella Approved members

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    I don't discuss the details with people (acquaintances) who don't know much about diabetes. I just say it's under control, but it's a non-stop 24/7 balancing and work. End of story.
     
  5. bamaboyd82

    bamaboyd82 Approved members

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    Sounds like our children were diagnosed at the same age, right around the same time. It is HARD! I just want to reassure you that you are not the only one experiencing day to day erratic changes and feeling completely lost at times, despite your best efforts. For us, things have just recently gotten a little bit better (although we still have plenty of crazy days). The things that have helped are 1) using a pump, so that we can do tiny, tiny doses of insulin and dose for every snack and seconds or dessert or whatever, and do different basal rates at different times of day to more accurately match my son's needs 2) prebolusing!, which we weren't able to do before because we could not rely on my son to eat the amount he initially would say he wanted. With the pump, we give insulin for at least half of the carbs he is served prior to every meal and the rest as soon as we see that he is likely going to eat a good meal. Part of this was also him just getting a bit older and being able to judge his hunger better. 3) the honeymoon ending--you say you think your child's honeymoon is ending. If so, yay! We have a good bit more predictability now that the honeymoon is over with. Before, we never knew if his pancreas was going to jump in or sit out. 4) The Dexcom has also been a huge help to us in preventing lows and figuring out patterns. We watch it very closely.

    Anyway, just want you to know you are by NO means alone. Hang in there!
     
  6. coni

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    The still working insulin should be factored in. This is called "insulin on board" or IOB. A pump has preprogrammed algorithms in it to deal with this so you don't over correct when there's IOB. On MDI, unless you know how to take IOB into account, most endos say not to correct until after the three hour mark when most (not all) of the working insulin is gone.

    However, if there's IOB from a meal or snack and my child eats again, I generally don't factor in IOB for the bolus because the bolus is for carbs eaten. (There are exceptions, e.g. if she's headed low, there's IOB and she eats, I wouldn't cover all carbs.)

    We're not MDI, so I don't know the names of the apps, but there are some out there to help with the calculations.


    Good luck! There's a lot to learn. I think you'll do fine because you're concerned, thinking, and seeking support.
     
  7. BarbDwyer

    BarbDwyer Approved members

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    One app is RapidCalc It is only as good as the info you enter so I don't rely on it entirely but it makes it really easy to quickly look and see if there is IOB without doing yet more math in my head 10 times a day. It is my favorite app so far and I've tried a lot of them, lol. You can only enter 200 carbs per meal. Life with teenagers that have black holes for stomachs renders that invalid ;)
     
  8. aprilodell

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    I will say the fact that my son also has Concerta on board all day helps with the teenage munchies. He only eats what he brings and nothing else. I worried before that he would not eat all that he pre-bolused for, but he has been doing well with it and it seems to have regulated his appetite, before he would go all day without food and then only eat at night, now he eats regular meals and is hungry for them.
     
  9. BarbDwyer

    BarbDwyer Approved members

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    I hate that eating schedule - which is what my house is like too.

    My son doesn't pre-bolus yet. :/ Only on a rare occasion.
     
  10. aprilodell

    aprilodell Approved members

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    we only pre-bolus and maybe it helps with the major fluctuations, I am not sure..still working these things out. I will say sometimes we pre-bolus and he is so hungry we eat.
     

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