- advertisement -

fear of going low at night

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by carcha, Oct 9, 2010.

  1. carcha

    carcha Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2009
    Messages:
    110
    My daughter had been pumping for about six weeks now, and things have been going pretty well. One problem has emerged, however, that has me worried. At night she gets nervous if her number is anywhere under 150-she is afraid she will drop low in her sleep and not be aware of it and die. When she goes to bed below 150 or so she doesn't sleep for hours and will come to me to check her sugar repeatedly until she's exhausted and finally falls asleep. It doesn't seem to matter if she's knows that I'll be waking her in two hours to check - she just won't sleep. If she's in the high ones or low two hundreds at bed time, she is clearly relieved and relaxed and goes to sleep without delay. Has anyone encountered this kind of problem? And if so, how did you deal with it? I want her numbers to be in range as much as possible, but I also want her to have peace of mind and sleep at night. I hate diabetes. Thank you.
     
  2. NomadIvy

    NomadIvy Approved members

    Joined:
    May 20, 2010
    Messages:
    1,130
    I really don't know what to say except I hope she'll soon learn to trust that you're there to check in on her. It might also help if she gets to talk to an adult with type 1 on pumps who keep their BG levels at around 100 while sleeping.
    It breaks my heart to see our CWD worry at such a young age.
    <<Hugs>>
     
  3. lotsoftots

    lotsoftots Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2007
    Messages:
    1,161
    sent you a pm :)
     
  4. valerie k

    valerie k Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
    Messages:
    1,510
    perhaps at night, her numbers should be in range, and you should give her a small 10-15 carb snack and tell her that will keep her just fine till you test. Im sorry she is going through this at her age.
     
  5. KHM

    KHM Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2010
    Messages:
    696
    I know what its like to be nervous about night-time lows. I would encourage you to ask her what will convince her that she is safe and that you are nearby to check.

    She might say she wants to maintain a certain bg throughout the night or maybe a night or two of being more near to you than usual will demonstrate that you are on board and everything is, in fact, OK and everything can be managed without excess testing and worry.
     
  6. StillMamamia

    StillMamamia Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2007
    Messages:
    13,195
    I'm sorry. I have not deal with this (yet), but wanted to suggest that perhaps a talk with the endo may help? Coming from someone else, maybe she'll feel more reassured? Not to undermine your parenting abilities, but sometimes kids listen better to an "outsider".
     
  7. BrokenPancreas

    BrokenPancreas Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,517
    poor baby... would she be willing to use a CGMS?

    Also, give her ice-cream before bed, it will keep her steady..
    I learned this from BeckyStevensMom and it works great..
     
  8. quiltinmom

    quiltinmom Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2010
    Messages:
    1,189
    Don't they wake up from feeling too low during the night? I am sometimes worried that my DS will be low during the night, but I (perhaps wrongfully?) assumed he'd wake if he got too low. Which I guess wouldn't work if your CWD is hypounaware (which my DS isn't).

    A CGM would probably alleviate her fears; it'll wake her if she starts to go low. That's probably what I would do, if possible. It might also just take time for her to learn to trust the pump.

    Wish I had more advice than that. Good luck!
     
  9. Jeff

    Jeff Founder, CWD

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 1995
    Messages:
    1,546
    Without wanting to cause undue fear or anxiety, I want to share some thoughts on this very important topic -- nighttime hypoglycemia.

    In recent years, studies of CGM data have shown that there is a lot of nighttime hypoglycemia -- a lot more than the medical community thought possible. There are links to many of these studies on our Care Suggestions page (http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/clinic/care.htm) under "Continuous Sensing," so I don't need to list them here.

    Given this, I am a huge proponent of continuous glucose sensing, the only tool we have today -- however imperfect it might be -- than can sense an impending low blood glucose and issue an alarm. I cannot recommend CGM highly enough.

    Now, with all of this said, it's important to understand that CGM tracings have also shown that really serious adverse events, such as seizure or worse, require hours of profoundly low blood sugar. Hours. So, in the absence of CGM, as a parent, checking blood glucose levels in the middle of the night, every night, can significantly reduce the risk of a prolonged, profound low.

    My suggestions:

    1. Share this knowledge with your daughter. The risk is real, but it's also important to understand the true magnitude of the risk.

    2. Get a CGM if you can.

    3. Promise to check your daughter in the middle of the night, every night, and then do it. Share with her the blood sugar data in the morning if she doesn't wake up to show her that you've done it.

    4. If this doesn't help, seek professional counseling. Many diabetes care programs include a psychologist, and you'll likely be able to help your daughter overcome her fear.
     
  10. maryellen816

    maryellen816 Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2008
    Messages:
    310
    My daughter dxd at 8, now 17 has never once woken from a low. She always feels her lows during the day but never at night so it is not something that you can count on.

    To the OP, I agree with having a discussion with your daughter about her concerns and offering up different solutions and then coming up with a plan with her. Then showing her the results of your nighttime tests (the next day) and going over whether the plan has helped her to feel more comfortable sleeping.

    Our kids are so brave and I along with you, hate this disease.
     
  11. KHM

    KHM Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2010
    Messages:
    696
    Thanks for this, Jeff. I noticed your daughter's T1 in the siggy---you must be very proud of her. Nice work there!
     
  12. Jeff

    Jeff Founder, CWD

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 1995
    Messages:
    1,546
    I just updated my signature -- should have done that a long time ago.

    Marissa is doing very well. We're all very proud of her.
     
  13. BrokenPancreas

    BrokenPancreas Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    Messages:
    1,517
    Does she want to be a CDE?
     
  14. Gracie'sMom

    Gracie'sMom Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2009
    Messages:
    1,039
    My daughter never wakes with her nighttime lows either, and she definitely feels them when she is awake. She doesn't wake when we check BG, change her dexcom site, change her pump site, give her a shot, make her drink juice, jump on her bed . . . I think everyone is different but talking to a lot of parents of CWD I haven't met one who's child wakes up when they are low, it is the parent checking and finding those lows. Could you tell her not to worry and that you will "worry" for her? I know I was a worrier growing up, about everything, and that was a successful strategy my mom used . . . asking me what I was worried about and then telling me to let her worry for me for a while . . .
     
  15. virgo39

    virgo39 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2010
    Messages:
    1,691
    The other PP's have had lots of suggestions. Does your DD understand that her basal rate varies and that it is different at night? Can you get her involved in some testing that might reassure her? I feel that something like that would work with my (younger) DD, but understand that each child is different and what works to reassure any particular child may vary.
     
  16. RosemaryCinNJ

    RosemaryCinNJ Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 9, 2008
    Messages:
    3,571
    I do the ice cream too..works like a charm here too...:)
     
  17. Jeff

    Jeff Founder, CWD

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 1995
    Messages:
    1,546
    Yes, she's working on it.
     
  18. Lee

    Lee Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Messages:
    9,633
    My daughter is one of those who has had extreme episodes of nighttime hypoglycemia. Oddly enough, they ALL have happened on nights when a 2 or 3 am bs check was not done. When my daughter does not have her CGMS on, she sets her alarm at her father's house so she can do a 3am check :)mad::mad:)

    At my house, she knows I will check her. I have promised to check her at 11:45 or midnight, and at 2 or 3am. She sleeps through the night secure with the knowledge that she will be tested. I test her toes at night because she sleeps through it but wakes up if I test her fingers.

    On a side note with the CGMS, she wakes up with the alarms at her dad's house, but sleeps right through them at my house. I asked her why, she said she knows I will hear them.

    My point being, if your daughter knows that she can rely on you to test her before you go to bed and once during the night, she will hopefully rest more peacefully and feel more secure at night.
     
  19. Carrie333

    Carrie333 Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    Messages:
    12
    how I helped my daughter

    Along with many other type 1's my daughter too was afraid of sleeping. She also blamed her father for her d as he is type 1 also. I took her to a counselor. Best thing I ever did!;) Now my daughter sleeps through the night peacfully & does not blame her father. I check her & her dad every night at 2:30 a.m. as this comforts her & keeps her dad from going to the hospital as he drops alot. When she spends the night at a friends house she sets her phone alarm to wake at 2:30, she tests & then she calls me. :) I also try to take on some of her responsiblities when she is out having fun so she can just feel like a normal kid for a while. :p I keep an eye on the real cure ( 3 years away) at www.faustmanlab.org & keep her updated.

    Carrie
     
  20. carcha

    carcha Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2009
    Messages:
    110
    I'm at the beginning stages of jumping through all of the insurance hoops in order to get the cgm, so hopefully that will happen soon and will reassure my daughter. Thanks for all of the ideas and support, I really needed them today.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice