- advertisement -

Fat Spikes?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by januaryblue, Jul 3, 2010.

  1. januaryblue

    januaryblue Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2009
    Messages:
    264
    I've heard the term here before, and I tried to do a search on it, but I would love it if someone could explain exactly what one is.

    We took the family to see Toy Story tonight and we gave DD popcorn (with butter) and M&M's. After the movie I made her go wash her hands, with soap in the bathroom and tested her sugar and she was 255. An hour later we are home and getting ready for bed, I test her sugar and it's saying 89!

    That's the second night in a row we have had a fast drop in her glucose and I am more then a little confused by it.
     
  2. slpmom2

    slpmom2 Approved members

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    Messages:
    641
    Fat spikes happen when the fat in the food you've eaten delays absorption of the carbs. If you've dosed it all up front, you'll often get a low soon afterward, because the insulin has kicked in before the carbs did. Then, hours later, the carbs kick in and there's no insulin to cover them, so BG soars and can be very hard to bring back down. Keep an eye on your dd tonight - she may need corrections.
    Good luck!
     
  3. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    The reason folks say, "insulin is not a cure" is that it isn't ... and managing D in a child is complicated. You have fat spikes, honeymoon, hormones, illness & injury, stress and sports ...

    I think you really need to accept that just because you give insulin and check bgs, that does not mean that you will end up with in range bgs. It's just the nature of the beast.

    I highly recommend Rangar Hanas' book, Type 1 Diabetes. It really helps to understand how injected insulin works: when it peaks and how it interacts with food.

    Please don't expect to be able to replicate the actions of a fully functional pancreas... if you do you'll always fall short.
     
  4. januaryblue

    januaryblue Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2009
    Messages:
    264
    Hmm, ok. I'm not sure if that's what's happening or not.

    We don't do corrections yet, she's still honeymooning and only on 1 U Lantus Am and 1 U PM- no fast acting yet.

    I gave her a snack of 13 carbs and now she is 134. I'll do a check again before I go to bed and probably a 2am just to see the bigger picture.

    Still confused.
     
  5. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2007
    Messages:
    12,521
    Because it's confusing. ;)

    Ever wonder why folks with years and years of this under their belts are still hanging around? It's because living with D IS confusing. It doesn't follow rules.
     
  6. januaryblue

    januaryblue Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2009
    Messages:
    264
    I'll check that book out thanks. I'm trying to read Think Like A Pancreas someone suggested here too.

    I don't think I'll ever be able to replace a pancreas perfectly...no aspirations of that. :cwds: Just all new stuff for me so I am trying to understand it as much as I can. I appreciate all the help. :)
     
  7. januaryblue

    januaryblue Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2009
    Messages:
    264
    darn it! LOL.

    My dad was T1...I always wondered why he didn't have it under better control and I admit I sometimes thought he could have been on top of it better. I wish he was still around so I could give him a hug and let him know I get it a little more now. It's still not mine, but my daughters, but I am dealing with it a little more personally then I ever have.
     
  8. slpmom2

    slpmom2 Approved members

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    Messages:
    641
    Hmmm... since she's not on fast-acting insulin yet, then what I described obviously isn't what happened. :cwds: Wonder if it was just one of those honeymoon quirks, when the pancreas decides to do its thing without any rhyme or reason?
     
  9. Heather(CA)

    Heather(CA) Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2007
    Messages:
    10,153



    Excellent advise!




    Honestly while I still pick something up now and then, the main reason I'm here is to try and help others. I would like to share what I have learned over the years so that others don't have to go through as much trial and error. With exercise for example...I hope that doesn't sound like I have a gigantic head:eek: I guess I feel like if I can help someone else, it helps me too...I enjoy it:cwds:
     
  10. helensspivey

    helensspivey Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2010
    Messages:
    8
    i am new this site so you'll have to give me chance to catch up... lol x

    as i am in the uk things are slightly different in messuring the sugar levels but from what i am reading its the same... the higher the number the higher they are.

    i have found the the health care team here are great but you get left to do alot yourself, and trusting your gut is the main aim of the game i have found. also there is no rule book for D and esp when they are a child

    my daughter has her own rule book on D just for her. (no symptoms for lows, is just one of those)

    so whatever you decide to do trust the fact you are her mum and you are the best person at your job.

    hope she is back to her 'normal' self soon

    take care
     
  11. emm142

    emm142 Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2008
    Messages:
    6,883
    To convert UK numbers to US numbers, multiply by 18 (and divide by 18 to convert US to UK - so an 89 is 4.9).

    To the OP: your daughter's pancreas is still producing some insulin. It might be producing it too late, so her BG rises after a meal to 255, and only then does her pancreas kick in to bring it down to 89. It might be that her BG wouldn't actually drop any further than that, once her body has got it at the level where it wants it.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice