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Family Resouce

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by lnlittleton, May 14, 2014.

  1. lnlittleton

    lnlittleton New Member

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    Hi Parents,

    I have been a type 1 for 16 years now (was diagnosed when I was 9). I am currently looking for a career change and hoping to work with diabetic children and be able to share my experiences and learnings with others.

    I am thinking about starting my own business where I would work with families of newly diagnosed children. Families would hire me to help transition to their new routine; act as a "buddy" to their child, ensuring they are cooping with the disease; or simply act as a resource, as someone that's been there.

    I'm hoping that you all could tell me if you think there could be a need for this? Would you or other diabetic parents pay for a service like this?

    Thanks so much for all of your help!
     
  2. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

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    I think your new title could be:

    Diabetes Life Educator!( I just coined that!)

    Yes I do think that there is a great lack of less formalized education and support that is need in. Even now having over 8 years under my belt we are coming up on different times, trying to figure out what is next in transitioning my dd to be more independent.

    Right now is a struggle, I would love to have someone that I could say hey I need to have my daughter work on this task away from me in a real context and report back to me how she did and her confidence level. There is only so many made up/pretend scenarios that I can do, and even then I am not getting a true story on how she would really do.

    I am sort of looking at this type outlook for my future, getting my BA in HDFS with a minor in Development Disabilities. I am looking to be broader in scope and wanting to help families/individuals find the resources that they need to fill in the holes between services that they use/need. And or to be that non-professional person that families feel comfortable with calling to directly talk to/ to brainstorm with.

    Have you looked into creating a non-profit and writing for grants?
     
  3. dpr

    dpr Approved members

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    Go to school and become a CDE. You'll have a very long and successful career :)
     
  4. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

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    There are actually only a few pathways to becoming a "CDE".

    What is your current education and training/job in?
     
  5. ksartain

    ksartain Approved members

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    This.

    I would not pay for a service like this because our endo office offers tons of support and are only a phone call away.
     
  6. sincity2003

    sincity2003 Approved members

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    If you don't want to be an RN (and go through RN school), there are very limited ways to become a CDE. I was going to go back to school starting next month because I want to be a CDE; however, I don't want to go through nursing school. Yes, I know CDEs are also nurses and it would be job security to fall back on, but being a regular RN is not my calling.
     
  7. dpr

    dpr Approved members

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    No not the easiest occupation to get in to. I looked into it a year or so ago when the company I work for decided to leave the state. The easiest way to get into it would be as a Dietician. Unfortunately at my age and lack of appropriate education I would be in my mid 50's by the time I completed all the requirements.

    From the NCBDE web site,
    One must be:

    a) A clinical psychologist, registered nurse, occupational therapist, optometrist, pharmacist, physical therapist, physician (M.D. or D.O.), or podiatrist holding a current, active, unrestricted license from the United States or its territories.

    OR

    b) A dietitian or dietitian nutritionist holding active registration with the Commission on Dietetic Registration, physician assistant holding active registration with the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants, exercise specialist holding active certification as an American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) Certified Clinical Exercise Specialist®, or exercise physiologist holding active certification with the ACSM as a Registered Clinical Exercise Physiologist®, health educator holding active certification as a Master Certified Health Education Specialist with the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing;

    OR

    c) A health professional with a master's degree or higher in social work from a United States college or university accredited by a nationally recognized regional accrediting body.
     
  8. jenm999

    jenm999 Approved members

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    If money were no object, I would LOVE to have a resource like you. Unfortunately, between co-pays, time off from work etc. we are tapped out.

    In fact, I just found out that one of the adult babysitters in town who does a lot of early morning care for working parents also happens to be Type 1 and we'd love to leave our son in the care of someone who knows what they're doing so we can have a, what do you call it?, a DATE. And we haven't done it yet because she's $15/hour.

    I think this would be similar to night nurses who come and take care of newborns so new parents can sleep. Lovely idea, but only available to the very wealthy.

    Sorry to burst your bubble - it's a lovely idea but there is probably not enough of a market of T1D families with the money to afford you.
     
  9. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

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    Unfortunately, I believe she's right. You have a lot to offer, though, as someone who has lived with T1D for years. It will take a few more years of education to obtain the necessary degrees, but I bet you'd make an excellent CDE.
     
  10. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

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    But if she hooked up with non-profits or created one herself, if she wrote for grants and other such funding she couls be piaid thru those and not the parents/caregivers.

    I am finding that there are a ton of different ways to find local resources that cover the costs of these types of things if your family can benefit from them, most of the Disabilities resousources do recognize Type 1 Diabetes as a qualifing/eligible disability.

    Sort of a sidebar here:
    I wish I would have know about our local Resip care for kiddos 0-5years when my dd was knewly diagnosed, or when I had my second baby. I would have loved to have been able to have a few hours of uniterupted sleep, or be able to go to the grocery during the day and not wait for hubby to get home, or yes have a lunch or dinner out with my hubby. just that time to be able to recharge and not feel like I am pawning off to family.

    I guess my point is that there are plenty of non-profits out there that have plenty of grant money and funding to pay all or most of the costs of these type of support systems if you truely do need them. I think that the T1D community just is put off by the idea of using "disability" rsources, but if I had known what I know now about my local resources I would have tried hard to get assistance with finding services/supports that would have helped my family deal with the early days/months/years and be stronger for it now. It did not have to be soo hard.
     
  11. missmakaliasmomma

    missmakaliasmomma Approved members

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    Personally, no. I couldn't pay for it, unless you could be contracted through insurance and they could pay for it. I'm sure a lot of people can afford it though.

    It definitely would be great.
     
  12. DavidN

    DavidN Approved members

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    I'm not sure having type one qualifies you to be a professional resource. There is a reason these positions require degrees licenses and certificates. Maybe there are parents who would not care about formal qualifications, but I would.
     
  13. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

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    It's not what you want to hear but I agree with DavidN. If you want a career working with D kids perhaps you could start by looking into being a counselor at FFL - though I admit, I have no idea what their staffing process is or looking at the general job openings at the ADA, JDRF and the like to see if your past work experience might be applicable in the D not-for-profit advocacy workplace.
     
  14. Beach bum

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    I guess I would start by working or volunteering in something diabetes based before I jumped into the pool completely. For example, see if you can work at a diabetes camp for a summer or volunteer through JDRF or ADA. I guess I'd wonder if diabetes 24x7 for yourself and others would get old. It's an interesting idea that you have, the hospital we went to had someone who did this with us, she was a CDE. She checked in everyday for weeks until we transitioned completely to our diabetes center. While it would be a valuable resource, I'd be concerned about how it would be paid for.
     

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