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Facepalm! What was he thinking??

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Mrs Puff, May 6, 2011.

  1. Mrs Puff

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    We have only been at this for five months and still have a lot to learn. That being said, I think my son (13) forgot his brain the last two days. Last night we were at 4-H meeting. As we were getting ready to leave I asked him what he had for snack. He guiltily :rolleyes: said he ate five miniature cupcakes that had chocolate icing. He was also sucking on a tootsie roll pop :eek: We were told by endo that if his bg was under 150 at evening snack that he can have a free snack. That doesn't mean a free for all, even if he was at 79! We decided to dose for the snack when we got home. Must have given too much because I decided to check him at 12:45am and he was 57. Fast forward to this afternoon. We are getting ready to go to the pool in town. I told him to have a large snack since he will be getting some exercise. I go to change clothes and when I come out he is giving himself a shot of 3 units of insulin:confused: He tells me that he is having a turkey sandwich, a pack of toast-cheese crackers and some saltines. The whole point of the snack was so he wouldn't go low while he was swimming! He just defeated the point! I usually lift weights while my kids swim and I was a nervous wreck thinking about him going low in the pool. His bg ended up being 74 when we were done. Whew! He is usually on the ball but I think it is time for some more diabetes education!:eek:
     
  2. monkeyschool

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    Ouch! Glad the numbers worked out well despite the mishaps. ;)
     
  3. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I'm really glad that the swim went well, but your post raises a really interesting question. What education does a teen/ tween get at dx?

    My daughter was little, so it didn't come up. Did your son get training at the hospital, as much as you did? Or did they train you and expect you to train him?
     
  4. wilf

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    I've actually been thinking of preparing a diabetes short course for my DD, and PAYING her to take it at a rate which would be competetive with a part-time job.

    The local clinic provides no training to teens, the expectation is that parents will do it. But how do you persuade a teen to take precious hours out of their evenings and weekends to spend yet more time on diabetes?

    I've come to the conclusion that there's nothing wrong with a little pay-off for time spent on good and important learning. I'd be interested to hear your thoughts.
     
  5. kiwimum

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    I guess we are lucky here in Auckland then. Every year for those kids born in a certain year and approaching their 13th birthday, the Diabetes Clinic at the hospital have a Adolescent Transition Day. The soon to be teens take a day off school and spend the day with the Diabetes team learning about what D means for them throughout their teens, drugs and D, food, etc, plus they learn about what to expect from future endo appointments. At the end of the day, the parents are invited for a recap of what the tweens have learnt.

    From the age of 13, the kids enter the Adolescent Transition Clinic, where they have the choice of having their parents attend appts with them or on their own, or for some of the appt and so on. It is to prepare them for when they enter the Adult Clinic, at age 18 (I think). They basically start to take control of their D, with the support of us as parents, and the D team. At each appt they are given a fact sheet about something to do with D and teens...last time it was about having D and driving, the time before that it was about all the different tests they will need throughout their lives and why they have them...
     
  6. nanhsot

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    My son was 15 at diagnosis and our endo/CDE team approached it as education towards HIM first and foremost, he gave the first shot, he took the first BG, he was quizzed while still in the hospital about carb counting, I was merely in the background soaking it all in. Pump training, CGM, same thing, I let him take the lead and the trainings were face to face with him, not me. I would be slightly challenged to work his pump, truth be told.

    Clearly they were relying on me and knew I was also there learning, but their approach was towards him, with me as backup. Obviously, since I'm here, I have chosen to immerse myself in education and he does lean on me a lot for carb counts (mostly recipes though) and higher order stuff, but he's the boss of his diabetes, and always has been. I consider myself support staff, maybe research assistant.
     
  7. emm142

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    I was dx'd at 14 and the education was all aimed towards me. My mum was there but she was really in the background (although she did get taught glucagon).
     
  8. kimmcannally

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    J was 12 (13 in two weeks) at dx and I was taught everything as though he was a small child. But since he is autistic, this was the route to go for us. Even at pump class, he paid no attention at all. Sat in the back of the class with a netbook I brought to keep him entertained. I knew if he wasn't kept busy with something, he would get bored and annoy the heck out of me while I was trying to learn how to operate his pump.

    He has slowly absorbed the info he needs to run the pump from me.
    But I do have to tell him exactly what I want him to do - if we had been in that situation of going swimming and him needing a snack first, I would have made sure I pointed out to him not to bolus.

    I think my DD might have done the same as your son, and she is neurotypical. It's good in a way that he has got it so embedded - eat = bolus.
     
  9. L101418

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    My daughter is 14 and pretty responsible so I think some of it HAS to be teenage-braindeadness. Right? She was at the school for a track meet last night and they went to the local diner/dive. She texted me some questions about carb counting and I asked what her bg had been throughout the evening. She hadn't checked. Wha?? So she hadn't checked from 3:00 until 8:30.

    At diagnosis the education was targeted at my daughters. I don't think our dr office offers any teenage specific education.
    I believe our local JDRF has a regular "Teen Talk" meeting.

    @wilf When will that book be published please?
     
  10. wilf

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    I've decided to start a new thread on this in the teens section, because this topic could hijack this thread.. :cwds:
     
  11. Christopher

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    I guess my question would be, is it clear to both of you what a "free snack" means? How many carbs does a "free" snack contain? I also would question the Endo's advice about eating uncovered food with a bg below 150. If you test him several times at night, is he in range or going high?

    Personally I try and avoid giving night time snacks between dinner and bed. If the expectation about snacks was clear to him, and he just chose to indulge in the treats without taking insulin, that is a different thing to me than him not being educated about managing diabetes. Good luck.
     
  12. Mrs Puff

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    They actually weren't real clear what constitutes a free bedtime snack. I would assume they meant about 20 carbs. However, we have been a little lenient in this area. Partly it is because he is still in the honeymoon phase and tends to go low. Free snack is the highlight of my son's day. He loves the fact that he can have something without a shot. Also, ds feels "safer" if he runs a little higher at night. I do too. Unless he has had a lot of exercise and wacky numbers during the day, I do not check him at night. This system has worked well for us, he just wasn't thinking.

    Edited to add: by running higher at night, I don't mean the 200's. Usually it is between 125-150.
     
  13. Mrs Puff

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    It was all kind of a blur, but if memory serves, some of it was aimed at both of us. When the CDE came in the room it was mainly towards me. It was more details about the disease and how to handle some things. They did request that we watch some videos on the hospital channel that explained stuff. When the doc came in and asked some questions, ds knew the answers. Before meals they would give us a menu and we could make choices and the nurse would help us add carbs and figure out insulin. The one tricky thing was that they showed us how to use a syringe to draw insulin from a vial but when we were discharged we were given novolog and lantus pens. I didn't know how to use them and had to read the directions at home. We were also given the Pink Panther book. I would read and learn stuff from the book and then discuss it with son.

    Here is the weird thing about my son, who just turned 13 before diagnosis. He can be anal retentive about some aspects of diabetes care (doc said to do this...when I am trying to make some adjustments on the fly) but then have no problem swiping occasional skittles during the day when he isn't low. It is like there is a disconnect somewhere in his brain:rolleyes: He will bark at his sister about not asking permission if she can have some milk, while purloined skittles are dissolving in his mouth :)

    I think someone should come up with some kind of curriculum that teaches diabetes care in stages. Obviously they can't load you up with too much info when you leave the hospital or no one would leave. I would have kept sleeping on that horrid bench if it meant someone else would be preparing food and giving shots! However, we all get home and feel clueless. If something new to learn was given to me once a week, that would be so much easier. Maybe that is what I need to do with my son. Once a week session where we learn something interesting like what fat does to insulin or how exercise affects his numbers. Maybe someone who has been at this a while can create something? hint, hint :D
     
  14. Christopher

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    I guess if you are not normally checking him at all at night, I can understand why he feels safer having high bg's at night. Without checking you have no way to know how that "free" snack is effecting him.
     
  15. danismom79

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    When you told him to have a large snack before swimming, did you remind him not to bolus? My daughter is 12, has had diabetes for 3 years, and still needs reminders. Did you check, did you bolus, did you forget to tell me your pump beeped....etc. This age is tough even without diabetes, and you're both still fresh. At some point you may forget your brain - I know I did in the beginning, and still do sometimes.
     

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