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Expert: Children with diabetes face trouble

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Ellen, Mar 17, 2011.

  1. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    http://www.salisburypost.com/News/031711-diabetes-Mayer-Davis-on-diabetes-qcd

    ....

    The study has shown that the children with type 1 diabetes are overweight at the same rates as other children, or even a little higher, Mayer-Davis said.

    "That's a concern," she said, since those with diabetes are already at a greater risk of cardiovascular disease.

    While one might expect that these children might make better nutritional choices than other children, that is not the case, she said.

    ...
     
  2. dejahthoris

    dejahthoris Approved members

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    Looks like another case of trying to bunch together type 1's and type 2's...
    I would love to see some scientific studies to back up this person's statement that type 1 diabetics are more overweight than non type 1's. That's the first time I have ever heard that one. I am pretty skeptical of things I read anymore. I want to see some back up if someone is going to make such a sweeping generalization about children with type 1 diabetes.

    I also disagree that type 1's do not make more effort to eat a healthy diet. The vast majority of parents of t1dm's I have encountered give their d kids a healthy diet and treats when it is warranted, like at celebrations and holidays, which I think is better for their overall health in that when undue restrictions are placed on a child regarding diet it tends to create more of a chance for eating disorders. Most parents of t1dm's I have seen make great efforts to keep mealtime relaxed and positive especially in light of the fact that carbs must be counted and insulin must be given, which is enough stress right there. We aren't living on sticks and rocks, but we are enjoying a healthy balanced diet of good home cooked meals, with the occasional treat of eating out -and dessert after a good meal if wanted.


    In short, I ain't buyin' it!:cool: (what do I know?)
     
  3. Jacob'sDad

    Jacob'sDad Approved members

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    No matter what the stats, "kids" are not MY kid. MY kid doesn't have to be a statistic no matter what.
     
  4. Amy C.

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    I have noticed that having Type 1 doesn't automatically mean you are thin. My son is thin, but I know a handful of other type 1 teens who are definitely overweight. I imagine that Type 1 diabetics are not immune from weight problems in either direction.
     
  5. Christopher

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    I don't know, it doesn't seem like there is anything intrinsically wrong with the article (aside from the boneheaded title; children with diabetes face trouble?? Really?? :eek: )

    In fact, to me, I can easily see how some children with diabetes might have certain factors in their lives that could cause them to be more overweight than a child without diabetes. I am thinking about all the times I have had to give Danielle food (high carb food) to bring up a low when normally, she would not have been eating. Especially in the middle of the night. Or the parents who give their children snacks right before bed (ice cream etc), in order to try and keep their bg "steady" overnight. I am not saying any of that is wrong, just that I think it plays a part.

    I am not saying I am blindly accepting the premise, just that it does seem plausible to me.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2011
  6. Alex's Dad

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    I couldn't have said this better thanks Dave.
    About the "article":

    " She was also recently appointed by President Obama to the Advisory Group on Prevention, Health Promotion and Integrative and Public Health, which directly supports First Lady Michelle Obama?s childhood obesity initiative." (this might explain some things)

    "Type 1 diabetes in youth ? the kind that requires insulin injections ? is most prevalent in Finland and Sardinia and least prevalent in Hong Kong and China."
    (what value do you get from this stat?)

    "Children with diabetes, Mayer-Davis said, need to be able to match insulin to food intake" (Really? no kidding?)


    Imho this article is just a bunch of "stats" put together to justified this women recent position and their fight against childhood obesity.
     
  7. Amy C.

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    I don't quite understand this. We are all part of some sort of statistic -- the city you live in, the country, your race, your religion.

    The point of the article is that children and teens living with Type 1 may not be making the best choices of food to eat. I know my son is heavy on the carbohydrates from chips and really should snack on fruit a little more than he does. Being overweight only adds to the complications of diabetes, plus it is doubly hard to lose the weight as a Type 1 diabetic.
     
  8. Lee

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    Actually - I do think that people with T1 face a tough road for maintaining weight. It is pounded into us that Insulin is a Growth Hormone. Coco has always been at the top of her charts for Height and Weight - so pretty proportional. Her CDE says all the time that she has to be careful due to this fact...

    I posted a few years back a study on weight gain and insulin that confirmed this. Also, bodybuilders abuse insulin since it is a growth hormone and packs on pounds...I honestly rarely meet super skinny T1's - if anything, most Adult T1's I know struggle to maintain a healthy weight...
     
  9. Nancy in VA

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    I think this is important to understand. Type 1s are at a higher risk of heart disease and overweight / obesity is a contributing factor to heart disease. If you are already at higher risk of something, I think its important to go to extra measures to reduce other contributing factors. If there are statistics that show that Type 1 diabetics ON AVERAGE are more overweight than non-diabetics, its something we should be congnizant of and work hard to ensure our kids arent to help prevent down-stream complications that are more likely
     
  10. Becky Stevens mom

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    I took Jacob's Dad's comment to mean that this statistic isnt written in stone for all of our CWD.

    I agree with this (if that is in fact what he meant;)) We can teach our children what a proper diet consists of by offering them the healthy foods that they should be eating but more importantly, eating the healthy foods ourselves. My son is no dummy, he wouldnt want to sit there eating some nice celery and carrot sticks while I sit there with a bowl of chips or a stack of cookies (thats why I eat that stuff while he is in school;) ) I think obesity in children is becoming a serious problem with far reaching repercussions for the future
     
  11. Jordansmom

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    I hate to jump on the type 1s are prone to weight problems, but from my experience, I have to agree 100%. I volunteer at D camp at Summer and winter camps. I see 100s of type 1 kids and teens. While the kids mostly are thin, the vast majority of the teens have serious weight issues. Especially the girls. There's definitely a pattern for their weight gain as well. Even the teen girls who are a healthy weight tend to have a fat layer on their bellies. A little pooch or a big pooch. There is a common appearance among many of them. After seeing so many of them over the years I have to believe there is added risk of obesity created by injecting insulin.

    I think sometimes we are so caught up in the fight with the outside world that our kids can eat anything that we can swing too far. Our kids have increased health risks they carry into their adulthood. We need to be teaching them that although they CAN eat anything, they need to be healthy eaters. So many people repeat that they don't want their child to develop an eating disorder from over emphasizing their need to eat healthy. There are alll kinds of eating disorders. Abusing your body with too much junk and forgoing healthy food in your teens can create long term bad habits that are their own eating disorder.

    I'm not casting stones. I'm actually recently trying to turn around a life time of bad eating habits myself, that I really don't want to pass on to my kids. I'm getting real about what I really think all of my kids future risk of health problems is. I don't kid myself into thinking my CWD doesn't have more serious health risks if she doesn't eat healthy and maintain a healthy weight. She absolutely does.
     
  12. MamaBear

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    I agree. My son has always been very skinny, and on the low percentile for weight. Now with giving snacks when he normally would not be eating, I have noticed his cheeks and his tummy have a little pudge going on.
     
  13. AlisonKS

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    most type 1 kids I've seen are a bit chubby-but their parents are too. I've read that if a parent is overweight their children are at risk too, obviously cause they eat what their parents do. One girl I met is obese at the age of 5 and both of her parents are too. They like to brag about how many carbs they eat :rolleyes:
    Tony is really skinny but he has hypotonia.
     
  14. Ashti

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    Good post all around!
     
  15. Jeff

    Jeff Founder, CWD

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    An important unspoken message in this discussion is that our kids with type 1 are not immune from the American condition -- and with it the increased risk for being overweight and becoming obese. Smply having type 1 does not exempt anyone from that risk.

    Good food choices and exercise are as important as ever, especially for our kids (and adults) with type 1, so as not to compound their cardiovascular risk factors.
     
  16. Heather(CA)

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    I took the article as saying that our kids are like all the other kids as far as weight gain or being thin. Not that they gain more or less. But that they didn't find a difference even though they have type 1. Which meant the same amount of kids are making either good or poor food choices regardless on whether they have type 1 or not.
     
  17. Snowbound

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    Which reminds me of the old statistics joke;

    If you're "one in a million" there are a thousand people just like you in China. :)
     
  18. wildemoose

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    I'm not sure--I know the body type you're talking about (and I did notice that a lot of the teen girls at FFL were built like that) but I am not sure it's 100% D related. I think it is a pretty common place for teenage girls to carry extra weight. I see a lot of girls walking around with that tummy pooch and I'm sure they're not all diabetic. I also know lots of T1 adults and we come in all shapes and sizes, but I can't say that anyone I know is actually obese. I want to lose eight pounds just like everyone else I know, but if I did I'd have nowhere to put my pump sites. :)
     
  19. Bigbluefrog

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    Interesting article,

    I really don't see the connection with type 1 diabetes and weight gain.


    I do see quite a bit of teenagers in general who are above average weight for their height....non d related.

    This teenage dilema is americanized fast food and junk foods being convient and lack of exercises.
     
  20. Christopher

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    one other thing to consider is that it is lipoatrophy from multiple injections or site changes. If one area is over used, such as the belly, it can get that look. Just a thought.
     

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