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Exemptions for blood glucose testing and "biohazard" issue for testing in school setting?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by thebestnest5, Aug 29, 2012.

  1. thebestnest5

    thebestnest5 Approved members

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    I hope someone is able to help me on the biohazard issue and blood glucose testing (test strips) in schools?

    I read in another thread about a blood glucose test strip exemption from biohazard status and other parents have fought this issue in schools and won.

    Anyone have any help on this?
     
  2. sooz

    sooz Approved members

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    What happens if a child falls down on the playground and scrapes their knee or gets a nose bleed? Do they become a biohazard? Just provide a baggie to put the used strips in and take it home for disposal. If it is a problem, contact the American Diabetes Society and their legal team will explain what your child's rights are to the school.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2012
  3. thebestnest5

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    The district nurse, school nurse and principal were all behind this, so I will be contacting the ADA for help.
     
  4. swellman

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    Then I hope they have a frigging CDC bio-hazard response team and plan if a student has a nosebleed.

    That having been said I don't honestly know what you mean by bio-hazard on strips mean. Should schools have different procedures for blood contaminated "things" than that of hospitals? I think not. I think all blood contamination should be treated seriously. I'm not sure what that means from a test strip POV means but I think they shouldn't be thrown into the general trash - they should be kept isolated from the general public in the same way sharps are contained.

    I don't think they should require a red bio-hazard bag to keep the strips in but, personally, I would be very embarrassed and apologetic if they found my son's test strips at school.

    Anyway, it's not clear what the issue really is.
     
  5. Beach bum

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    Last year, my daughter tested at the nurse and was about to throw her strip out. They made her put her hand in a baggie, take the strip out, turn the baggie inside out and seal it. :rolleyes: My daughter was smart enough to know that that was silly so would toss the strip in her bag, but now I have a tic tac container she uses. Now, she tests, puts in the container and washes her hands and she's on her way.

    IMO, in relation to hazards, there are many other things that are much worse and a contamination risk than a little test strip that dries up in about 2 seconds.

    Keep us posted!
     
  6. sarahspins

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    The school isn't allowing her daughter to test in the classroom because it presents a "biohazard".

    IMO that is a pretty big issue.
     
  7. MomofSweetOne

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    The administration must be clueless on how much blood gets all over desks, papers, etc. with the loose teeth that come out! The blood on test strips is nothing in comparison.
     
  8. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    Are they not allowing girls in school when they have their periods????
     
  9. Michelle'sMom

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    Exactly what I was thinking.
     
  10. swellman

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    Oh ... I guess I missed that somewhere. That is a big issue and I would bring up all these other points as very inconsistent in my "discussions".

    I'm fine with the baggie or container thing as I can understand other parents not wanting to see strips lying around as well all know they can.
     
  11. MTMomma

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    Blood and schools

    In the nearly ten years our son has been testing BG in school we only ran into one roadblock with the concern about blood in the classroom. We where able to get past that with the help of the nurse and during a meeting used a fresh lancet and check my own glucose level.

    The group expressed shock at really how very little blood is needed and how well it becomes contained in the strip. Much less than a student who might get a paper cut or pick at a skin sore or scab.He puts then in the pocket of his cargo shorts and then we try to remember to remove them before they hit the laundry.

    We really push for DS to be able to test in the classroom as we have found it safer not to leave, honestly less distracting to the class once they get used to seeing it, and he misses less of what is being said by the teacher.

    Stay strong. Advocate. Educate. You can do this!!!
     
  12. Mish

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    Same thing I was thinking. Do they have biohazard disposal in the bathrooms?

    What do they do with dirty tissues? Or when the 5 year old picks a scab and it bleeds all over?

    I think they're just putting up roadblocks.
     
  13. GaPeach

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    Yep - time to ban menstrual cycles, nose bleeds, paper cuts, hang nails, loose teeth, picking at scabs, as so much more....

    School can be such a scary and hazardous place:rolleyes:
     
  14. sooz

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    Please let us know how it goes.
     
  15. valerie k

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    and yet daily, I send my kids to school with a deadly weapon, the pensil. In those lunch time riots with the little critters, that can become a "prison yard" shank, one mean strike to the juggler.... its all over.
     
  16. Flutterby

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    While looking through PDF files I came around this http://www.sde.ct.gov/sde/lib/sde/PDF/deps/student/health/GlucoseGuidelines.pdf in there it states
    I found another for testing in the classroom at the ADA site http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/33/Supplement_1/S70.full#ref-24 They have articles sited but they all belong to sites that you need to pay for to be able to see the entire article. Maybe someone has an account that can get the things you need out of it.
     
    Last edited: Aug 31, 2012
  17. Yellow Tulip

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    I fought this battle two years ago, when my son started second grade. This included the principal screaming at me in front of the school during pickup time :rolleyes: yeah, very professional...

    Anyway, I ended up calling the ADA and they provided documentation that stated that there is no risk of exposure to the other children. Brought the documentation to the 504 meeting and the principal and the student services person were as sweet to me as can be :)

    Anyway, my son is now in 4th grade. Has been testing in the classroom for the past 2 years. They insisted that he have a red sharps container to put the used test strips into, so I said fine. Small compromise.

    Call the ADA. They'll give you what you need. Good luck!
     
  18. mmc51264

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    I get mad at my son for throwing them all over the place. I am a nurse and at the hospital, they go in the sharps b/c they do have blood products on them. I hate to admit that I don't know what they do with his at school :eek: No one has ever mentioned it. That's about the only thing they haven't given us a hard time about.
     
  19. NeurosurgeryNP

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    Not for nothing, but even in the hospital are test strips not thrown in the red bag. Only soaking dripping items with blood are. I don't understand their issue.
     

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