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Endos that tell parents a hypo will wake their CWDs

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by Michelle'sMom, Jan 30, 2012.

  1. Lisa P.

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    When Selah was first diagnosed our endo discussed nights. He didn't direct me to do anything. What he said was that in some diabetics there is the ability to recover from a low with what I now know is a rebound (he didn't use technical terms at the time, just said her liver might put out glucose) but that this was a function of the alpha cells and some diabetics seemed to have alpha cell problems too, or develop them over time, so you couldn't count on it.

    He also was sure to point out that if I came in and found her unresponsive not to bother checking her bg, use glucagon ASAP.

    Did it heighten my anxiety? I don't think so. It was good and accurate information. He didn't tell me she'd die if she went low at night, he said her body might very well protect her. But he didn't give me a false sense of security either.

    I'll never know why he was so direct and specific and took this approach. He may have seen cases of night lows that gave him perspective. Or he could just be a good doctor. But I'll always appreciate the information he gave me those first days, especially now that I see it's not necessarily the norm for care.

    BTW, he's the one who sent me here. He said there are a lot of sites out there that will give you bad info or scam you on diabetes. But there's this one, CWD, that has good info.
     
  2. emm142

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    I think I wrote earlier that I don't know that I've ever woken up from the symptoms of a low, but I just remembered one time that I did wake up and I was symptomatic. It was a few years ago (http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com/showthread.php?t=33505) and I was 29 at 1AM. It felt like adrenaline/panic, and I was sweating a lot as well. But at that point in time I did generally feel hypos and it still took a 29 to wake me up.

    Interestingly, even when I was hypo aware, I used to generally only feel lows when I was standing up. Like sometimes I would get to the end of class, stand up and suddenly realise that I was low. :eek: So the whole lying down whilst sleeping thing probably didn't help with my awareness.
     
  3. BittysMom

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    A light just went off in my head from your post. Caroline has recently started feeling some lows and it's often when we get out of the car, get up to do something etc. and each time I ask her why/if she waited until we were "done" to tell me and she she just shrugs. I think this is exactly it- the standing up after being seated is when she feels it. It's her legs that she feels it in at times too so that makes sense. Interesting, and thanks!
     
  4. buggle

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    I think there are several reasons that D teams don't tell parents to check overnight. One is that they are ignorant about the dangers. Lots of doctors in different fields don't have an accurate understanding of the diseases they treat, so I guess you'd expect that endos wouldn't be any different. Many people in medicine also just repeat what they heard or learned. Many don't stay on top of the literature or listen to parents or others, who are often more aware of the day-to-day patterns than anyone else.

    I think the other reason is that they feel most parents wouldn't check. I don't know if that's true or not. Parents who seek out extra info, like on this forum, are usually more willing to work harder at management. The A1c's that people on CWD have are way, way lower than what our endo says she sees for most kids at the center. Just like most cardiologists don't insist their heart patients to go on a very restrictive diet, exercise, meditate to remove stress, etc -- they usually hand them an Rx for lipitor, because they know most people won't make drastic changes in life style and stick to it. I think endos just assume that parents won't give up sleep to check on their kids at night.

    Personally, I think they should tell parents the risks if BG isn't checked during the night and let us decide. It's hard to be continuously sleep-deprived, especially when I'm not young. But I think this should be our call as parents. And keeping this information from parents is unforgivable, IMO. Teams may worry about scaring us, but fear is the motivation that keeps many parents checking every single night.
     
  5. Mik's Mom

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    My daughter was diagnosed at 6 years old and is now 13, I was adviced to check her at 2- 2:30 am every night, and I still do. There are many nights when she is low and I have to wake her to give her a snack. Some nights she is high and I can give a correction with via her pump without even waking her. She has never once woken up with a low blood sugar- not even when her bg was in the 20's. Trust your instincts
     
  6. Timmy Mac

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    yeah its pretty much the same. The only thing that is different is that I'll sometimes see spots (like if you stare at the sun too long) when I'm really low.

    Why can't diabetes affect us all the same? it would make this stuff a lot easier...
     
  7. Lisa P.

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    Yeah, isn't there someone we can write to about that? :p
     
  8. sugarmonkey

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    Emma - Phillip is the same. He rarely feels his lows when he's sitting down, but if he's standing up he does. Sometimes he'll do a test when sitting, it'll say he's low, and when he stands up to get something for it then he feels it.
     
  9. DsMom

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    I've mentioned this before here, and although I'm sure it doesn't happen all the time, my adult niece says she has a particular sort of dream when she is low that often wakes her...and a different sort of dream when she is high! I always thought that was so cool. Wish my little guy had a warning system like that.
     
  10. Lisa P.

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    Wow, human beings are amazing. Love it.
     
  11. wildemoose

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    Same here. When I'm low I have dreams that I feel low and am trying to find some juice, or that I'm drinking juice/eating glucose tablets and not getting any better, and then I wake up.
     
  12. MomofSweetOne

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    An adult Type 1 friend says she dreams of food when she's low at night. My daughter says things start to look like Accu-chek meters and skins when she's low...but that's awake. Nighttime wakings for lows have only occurred twice or thrice, always when I was out.
     
  13. ashtensmom

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    DD woke last night at 1:25 feeling low!!! She was 50. She beat me by 5 mins as I had the alarm set for 1:30 :eek: I was happy that she woke as like everyone else, I wonder whether she would or not. This in NO WAY means that I will stop checking through the night, it's just good to know she woke. Also, its just once, and who knows what she will be like in future because things change with D all the time. I only pray that she continues this pattern of feeling her lows.

    I asked her what woke her up (whether it was a dream or what) and she said not a dream she just woke... and she was cold. She said she only had her bed sheet on her and not her quilt. I thought the being cold was different as I heard you sweat when you are low, but then I thought maybe she was sweating from being low and kicked off her quilt, and hence felt cold and then woke? Who knows?
     
  14. buggle

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    After almost 4 years of diabetes, my son finally woke up twice for lows. That was a few weeks ago. He hasn't woken again for a low since... :(
     
  15. Michelle'sMom

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    My dd sweats a LOT when she's low, whether asleep or not. It's a different kind of sweat though. Her skin is very cold & the sweat is like water, instead of the sticky feeling sweat of a good work out or being outside in the heat. Her first symptom of an oncoming low is feeling cold.

    Dh & I have discovered we can tell by her body temperature whether she's high or low when sleeping. When high, she almost feels feverish. When low, she feels cold.
     
  16. ashtensmom

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    Chiming in again to say that DD has had MANY lows overnight and this the first time (that I can remember) where she woke.
     
  17. mamamccoy87

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    Waking up low

    Havent read the study but we test at least 2x at night - not only to check for lows but also if high. Grace has woke up low during the night and said she feels low, also woke up from a nap one time when she was 27 (YIKES) but she has also been low lots of times when we gave checked her. I would not count on her waking up from lows, and endos can tell you all they want but they dont live with it day to day, and its not their kid.
     
  18. heamwdevine

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    Anna only woke up for the first month or two if low. That is NOT true at all. That endo needs to be told to stop saying that right away!!! I would be calling that endos boss and letting them know what is being said. They must be new, young or just not know what they are talking about.
     
  19. Michelle'sMom

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    Our first endo had over 20 yrs experience with treating CWDs, & she's certainly not young. She advised that overnight testing was not necessary. The problem is more that they rely info from studies done on adults, older outdated studies, or their own personal opinions..which may or may not be based on any info from parents.
     
  20. Darryl

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    Leah has never woken from a low since she was diagnosed.
     

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