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Don't Say "Sugar"

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Junosmom, Nov 9, 2013.

  1. Junosmom

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    My son, age 11, has been a bit sensitive about people "knowing" about his diagnosis. He is of the temperament that doesn't like attention drawn to himself and just wants to be like everyone else. I am sensitive to that and know that in part, that's just age-related. (Perhaps too, a bit genetic. FIL would tell us a week after he'd had a major heart procedure or surgery for prostate cancer - didn't want us to worry :( )

    But at home....he's very sensitive too about wording. He'd rather I not say "please test your blood sugar (or glucose)". He likes us to say, "take a reading" or "give me a number". Arg.

    So, I'm wondering, when you ask your child for a BG reading, what words do you use? In public? At home?
     
  2. missmakaliasmomma

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    My daughter is only 5, and diabetes is all she knows so she's not sensitive at all to people knowing. She voluntarily discloses that information lol. We just call it her "sugar" so I say, "I have to test your sugar" or just "i have to test you"
     
  3. Teacups

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    We call it testing... "Have you tested.... could you please test?" If it is after the fact we ask, "What's your number?"

    Sometimes we just tap the finger as a reminder to test or with a questioning look if we want to know the number. This would be in a group setting or similar where it is not the right time or place to ask out loud.

    HTH!
     
  4. Traci

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    We just say, "Would you check?". When he was little, I'd ask him if we could see how sweet he was.:cwds:
     
  5. StacyMM

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    We usually say, "What's your number?" or "Check your number." At school, I think they usually hear something more formal, like "You need to do a finger stick."
     
  6. TheLegoRef

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    We always say "bg". If I ask him to test, I say "please test now" or "you need to test in the next few minutes" or "test and calibrate". If I'm asking what number he is after he tested and he didn't say it out loud, I say "what's your meter say" "what's your bg" "what's your sensor say", "I need to know your bg before deciding how long to prebolus"

    My son doesn't have a problem with "sugar", but I find it silly for some reason. We're not testing his sugar, we're testing what's in his blood. Sugar is in a bowl on the counter for cooking lol. I know we're testing the amount of sugar in the blood, etc, etc, but it just sounds odd to me. I never use "sugar" when asking about bg's or testings.
     
  7. Beach bum

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    We say "can you test" or "check your bg." At camp they say time for BGM.

    When my daughter was younger (diagnosed age 4) we would say "sugar, can you test your sugar?" Just a silly thing to say so it wouldn't seem like such an annoying chore.
     
  8. LoveMyHounds

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    I just say/text: "BG?" or "G4?"
    Our secret language :D, but DD is not shy about her D at all.
     
  9. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I think it's one of those things in D where you just do what makes the kid comfortable and don't even bother thinking about that other people do.

    I'm sure a lot of people have code words that they use. For some reason my kid calls her CGM, "Wilson" so half the time I'll ask what "Wlison says". I think things like that just evolve.

    PS the only one that makes me cringe in "sugars", as in "How are her sugars?" :p Hate that.
     
  10. ksartain

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    Chris is rarely embarrassed by his diabetes. We ask him to check his sugar.
     
  11. mmgirls

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    we are 7 1/2 years in, and she is now almost 9. Been CGM'ing for over 4 of those years. Specific to BG testing we say,"wash your hands and test", or "you need to test first".

    Specific to CGMing we aske, "what does your meter say" or "what is your number" "arrows" "number".

    I am pretty sure they use "test" and "number" at school
     
  12. MomofSweetOne

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    The question that makes me cringe is "Her levels must be stable since you're been doing this for so long now?" I look at them and say, "She's in PUBERTY. NOTHING is stable." to which they get a horrified look because it's never occurred to them that all the puberty craziness that they see in other ways also comes into play in diabetes.

    The question at our house is "What's your BG?" Mine is not shy about D at all. When she was at non-D camp, she was letting her cabin mates decorate and insert her pods, and they had juice box races when she had lows to see who could finish first (no one beat her the entire week!). She has found that most people are interested and supportive if she's not trying to hide it and is willing to teach them. I hope your son finds someone who can be this for him.
     
  13. Christopher

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    I usually say can you please check your number or bg. For some reason I really don't like the term sugar. It just seems old fashioned to me. "Grandpa's sugars are low and he is having one of his spells". No offense to people who use it though.

    My other pet peeve is when people say someone is a diabetic. I prefer saying someone has diabetes or a person with diabetes. I know it is just semantics but saying someone is a diabetic seems like it defines who they are instead of what they have.
     
  14. MomofSweetOne

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    This has come up in discussion on threads before. What I found interesting is that most of the parents didn't like the diabetic label, but the T1s themselves didn't care. My daughter doesn't. In fact, the other night she brought up in conversation how weird it would be to have a cure because of how much she has integrated diabetes into who she is. Don't get me wrong; she would love to be free of highs, lows, trying to be a pancreas, but she has accepted it as part of who she is at least for now.
     
  15. nanhsot

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    This is such an individual thing, and I think you just have to respect his needs, and they may change over the years or he may stay private. My son is very open, almost too open about it (he's been to known to put a syringe behind his ear, james dean style), but he's had friends who were so private it was almost scary to me (as in, his football coach didn't know).

    I think it's pretty normal at certain ages NOT to want anything to seem different about oneself. It's a tough enough world to navigate without having something so startlingly different. I feel for your son, but I bet he'll grow into his skin soon enough and it'll just be part of who he is and he'll be less sensitive to it. My son (he's 19) kind of likes how it separates him from the pack.

    To answer your questions we do ask "what's your sugar".
     
  16. nebby3

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    Mostly I say "check yourself" or "we need to check you." funny story-- when my dd was little she thought the word for finger was "number" because we would say "We need to check your number" and then grab her fingers.
     
  17. Lakeman

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    Ditto. Those are exactly the words we use.

    I am aware that she might one day or at some time be sensitive so when that day comes we can come up with something else.

    I would add that when it is time for her shot or if I want to know that she did in fact have her bolus I ask "did you get your poke"

    When I want to know if she feels low I ask "how do you feel" which can occasionally be confused with a desire to know how she is feeling about something. If she across the room I hold my thumb out but sideways so it is neither a thumbs up nor a thumbs down sign and she responds either with a thumbs up that she is feeling fine or a thumbs down that she feels low.

    Good question OP.
     
  18. Megnyc

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    I hate the term "diabetic." But most other adults with type 1 I know don't mind it at all.

    My parents always said/say, "go grab a bg" or "what does your meter/sensor say." When they would text me it would just be, "meter bg?" or "sensor?"
     
  19. nanhsot

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    Sometimes I'll text my son "how's it going" and he'll text back "106". To which I reply "that's awesome, but I actually wanted to know how your life was going"!! LOL.
     
  20. moco89

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    I am not a parent, but I would deal with and be respectful your child's issues about not wanting you to say "sugar" and not wanting people to know about his diabetes. I would do what he asks, as long as this does not compromise control of his diabetes.

    When I was in middle school, only one of my friends knew that I had diabetes, and I went to a school with over 500 students.

    I do not care if somebody calls me "diabetic". The term is rarely meant to be derogatory, and was used commonly in the 90s when I was growing up with diabetes. I do not think that calling somebody "diabetic" is nearly as acceptable as it was almost 20 years ago.

    Anyways, my point is, try to make an effort not to embarrass your child. This causes unnecessary stress for your child, and this could cause both you and your child grief, one way or another.
     

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