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Does this sound right to you?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by CButler, Nov 13, 2008.

  1. CButler

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    A book I am reading on anxiety in children says that long term consumption of sugary foods can lead to weakening the pancreas and developing type 2 diabetes. The book was recommending limiting or getting rid of all sugar in the child's diet for better blood sugar control and better behavior.(of a non-diabetic child) Is this right? Also, do you restrict sugar in your child's diet?
     
  2. joy orz

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    I think there has been some good research that shows children who eat a healthy, well balanced diet, do better in school than kids who eat a poor quality diet. This can get overgeneralized by self proclaimed experts to mean anything.

    I know my nephews do better when they don't have sugary foods. I know I also feel better when I am eating better. The whole "you are what you eat." does really hold true for some people.
     
  3. Dx011106

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    I have been a nanny to a handful of children (two families). I can tell a drastic difference between when they had for a treat at the end of the day for a classmate's party and when they did not. They would be full of energy then suddenly incredibly irritable and then completely crash after cupcakes and juice or soda in class. If I take them home, sans sugary snack, and give them apples and peanut butter with crackers and cheese, they are much more focused and willing to finish homework in a timely manner. I've noticed the same trends with other kids I've nannied and babysat.

    I know I feel better without a sugar-loaded day (both before and after diagnosis).
     
  4. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    Every thing in moderation, sugar included, I'd avoid processed though.
     
  5. CButler

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    I too believe that no one needs a lot of sugar.
    I was referring more to the statement about sugar causing type 2 diabetes. I know it doesn't cause type 1, but I really didn't think it caused type 2 either, except for the being overweight risk.
    When I was reading, I thought he was going to lump both types together, but it did refer to type 2.
     
  6. Lisa P.

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    I have had a custom soap box made just for talking about how I feel about sugar -- I firmly believe that even what is considered a moderate diet in the U.S. right now contains far, far, far more refined sugars than the body was every made to handle. That given, I don't know about the type 2 thing but our endo explained type 2 as having a genetic problem so that you have a rubber band, lifestyle choices (diet, exercise, etc.) can stretch that rubber band so that it wears out or snaps sooner than it would have otherwise. Seems to me, then, that if you have type 2 that would naturally manifest mildly at 70, a high sugar diet could easily make it manifest harshly at 30.

    But whadda I know.

    What's the name of the book?
     
  7. CButler

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    The Worried Child by Paul Foxman, PhD pp.203-204

    The book is good, but I just ran across this part about diabetes.
     
  8. danismom79

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    I agree with others about sugar in general. I don't single sugar out for restriction, but I do try to maintain an overall healthy diet (save the McD's and BK on occasion ;)).

    What I understand about type 2s - and of course I could be wrong - is that they actually produce too much insulin, but they can't use it efficiently. So the weakening of the pancreas doesn't make sense to me. I think what could be happening is that the excess sugar in the diet causes them to release a lot of insulin, and that large influx of insulin can help contribute to insulin resistance. Excess glucose and insulin also leads to fat storage.

    Am I way off? :eek:
     
  9. Nancy in VA

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    I could see that. We all know that processed, refined sugar is the most difficult for us to deal with in our diabetic children, because our bodies process it so quickly. So it wouldn't surprise me that its harder on our pancreas. We've all felt the sugar crash coming from eating too much sugar and then crashing later. So, I would imagine that if a person consistently eats refined sugar over and over that the pancreas can really have issues with trying to deal with it, and your body becomes accustomed to the sugar high followed by the crash and eventually resistent to the insulin that is trying to treat the sugar.
     
  10. Grace

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    That's my understanding of Type 2, as well. It's not about what the pancreas is doing, but about what the cells aren't doing (letting the insulin in to metabolize the sugar.) Then the brain tells the pancreas to make more insulin, but the cells still can't use it.

    But while I really don't buy into the theory, I still regulate sugar in my dc's diets. All of our diets, really. And we still have a LONG way to go!
     

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