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Do you wish you'd started pumping at dx?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by virgo39, Sep 18, 2010.

  1. SarahKelly

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    For us yes, I still am confused as whey we even waited 6 weeks as our endo didn't like to do diluted insulin but instead we were giving "smidges or wiffs" of insulin. A not yet two year old doesn't need much insulin at all and therefor it would have been a great benefit to have started with being able to accurately dose him and have a tool that kept track of the insulin working so that we could either treat the high again or know that it would come down with the amount of insulin that was still working. And to know when he was low how much insulin was still going so that we weren't over treating so often. Yes a rookie thing, but the pump has helped us dramatically with such a young small child whom needs less than 5 units of insulin a day. So that we can parent him without always having to worry if our smidges or wiffs were the right guesses for that meal.
     
  2. SarahKelly

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    and I might add the ability to disconnect the pump and therefor stop the insulin from being delivered has been a life saver for us with our little babe. I can't stress enough how different it is to have a two year old with diabetes...I am thankful for this technology...daily.
     
  3. hawkeyegirl

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    You've obviously never had to hold your crying 3 year old down 4-5 times a day while he begs you, "Please don't hurt me, Mama!" Two years of MDI would have been the end of me.

    Believe me, five months of MDI were plenty long enough to learn MDI sufficiently, and my 3 year old completely understood the "luxury" of the pump when we started.
     
  4. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    It's just an insulin delivery mechanism, not a reward for those with good behaviour. :rolleyes: I do not understand this idea that pumps have to be "earned" by years of "punitive" MDI. There's no puritanical imperative in D ... there's just good management, be it by shots, or pumping.
     
  5. ecs1516

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    Yes, ditto to that. May I add ,"holding my 10 month old giving a shot." You can't explain to a 10 month old baby that this is to keep them alive. You can explain that to a 5 year old.:rolleyes:
     
  6. sammysmom

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    You have obviously never had a baby that was diagnosed. You have never had to eyeball less then a 1/4 unit and you have never had dilute insulin and hope for the best. Insulin is insulin, no matter how it is delivered. We had no "freedom" on shots. My son has been on Lente, Ultra lente, nph, reg, really everything except the animal insulins. There is no freedom that comes with drawing up a syringe and poking my child 8+ times a day and there is no freedom feeding insulin when he was on a 2 shot a day program. We find way more freedom from only using one insulin and not having to worry about peaks and valleys of long acting and intermediate acting insulin.
     
  7. danismom79

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    I don't. I think it would have been a little too much for either of us to swallow at the time.
     
  8. Flutterby

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    We went on a pump fairly quickly.. I do wish that we went on a pump asap, not because of the shots, and her not wanting them (she actually didn't make a huge fuss about them) but the fact that we can manage better.. we had an absolutely horrible time with injections.. she was so sensitive to insulin, bouncing all over the place.. crazy ratios and ISF.. BUT I do think that its important for everyone to know how to manually do the calculations, understand the calculations and know how to give injections, draw up insulin etc. in the case of an emergency.
     
  9. Flutterby

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    It doesn't take a couple of years to learn the ins and outs of injections.. pumping isn't a reward and shouldn't be viewed that way.. Some insurance companies view it that way as well, and they refuse coverage. Pumping is another way to deliver insulin, its not a earned reward. We had an extremely hard time managing my daughter's blood sugar, she had daily swings of 40 to 400.. trying to draw up .25u ACCURATELY is extremely hard. Moving to the pump 4months after diagnosis improved her over all health and well being, and thats what its about. We had plenty of time to learn injections, how insulin works and how to do calculations and make changes on our own. Whatever method works for you, yourfamily and life style is what you should go with.
     
  10. tiffanie1717

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    I actually am fine with being on MDI at the beginning. I think it is good to know how to do MDI for the times when the pump gets submerged in the pool...2 times...and fries each time and you live in the country so you can't get a pump overnight. I'm just sayin'. :) haha. Seriously though I'll never forget how to do MDI if the need arises.

    I do wish, however, that we were able to start the pump sooner that we did. Our endo waits 4 months and our insurance made us wait 6.
     
  11. chammond

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    We had a different situation in which our endo advised pumping at diagnosis. We tried shots for 2 days, and had several dangerous lows during that time even with diluted insulin. I am very happy that with a baby we were given the option. As for learning how to use the pump, I really don't think it was much more difficult. My husband and I have grown up around technology, and although this is different than using a computer or cell phone, it really wasn't that difficult. Logan was still nursing, so we started with just a certain bolus based on how long he nursed or how much baby food he ate. We didn't start using the more advanced pump features (such as carb boluses) until about a month in. It was absolutely difficult, but having the ability to turn off or down the basal made it worth it, rather than having to force feed several times a day.
     
  12. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I find it really interesting that the consensus seems to imply a linear progression from shots to pumping as though they are steps in some ridged plan. Just because injections are the cheaper and older method of delivering insulin does not mean that one must do shots first, in order to "advance" to pumping.

    Putting aside the question of being dxd and having a device attached vs the relative physical freedom of injections, there is no reason why a person couldn't learn about how insulin works, it's duration and efficacy from pumping just as well as they could from shots IF they were trained correctly. And as for learning how to do injection in an emergency, yes, by all means we have to be trained there as well, but just because I know how to make a fire in my fireplace, doesn't mean that I have to go all winter with the heat off just to prove my fire starting skills.
     
  13. OSUMom

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    for at least couple of years? :eek: Everyone's situation is different as you are now reading. I'm curious what you think about someone diagnosed in high school? someone who was diagnosed 2 weeks after just graduating high school like my son?

    The good news is our insurance company okayed an insulin pump right away. My son didn't leave the hospital with an insulin pump, but the first visit to the endo office we started the process. He was on an insulin pump within 2 weeks of diagnosis. Best decision. If the doctor or our insurance company would have dictated that he had to wait, oh boy watch out. ;)
     
  14. OSUMom

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    I totally agree and was thinking the same thing (well not the fireplace thoughts ). We learn about Glucagon in an emergency but most haven't had to use it.
     
  15. Lee

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    This has always been my argument - how is delivering insulin via a syringe such a better method then via a pump - you have to learn how to deliver insulin.

    I dislike the fact that patients somehow have to prove themselves ready to handle a device that gives them more freedom and yes, in our case, better control! It makes MDI seem like a 'punishment'...you do not have enough skills to pump - you need stay on MDI longer!
     
  16. virgo39

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    Well said. I agree completely. As I mentioned in the OP, I'm looking at DD's old records and I as I enter the data, I can sooooo clearly see how she was waking up in range and we were not giving her enough insulin in the a.m., then over-correcting at lunch time, dealing with (by over-correcting) afternoon lows, and 2:00 a.m. highs, a lot of which would have been addressed by the correct basal profile and ISF and dosing in at least .10 u.

    I'm trying not to beat myself up over this, but it's hard to look at.
     
  17. truck2ff

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    No, but it's a personal decision and our boy was a very mature 7yr old at dx. My cousins son was 10 months at dx and the stories about MDI with their ds would probably make me think long and hard about it. I think we were lucky, our DS had pretty good numbers that first year on MDI and it gave us a good base to work with when he decided HE wanted to start pumping. I never saw MDI as some type of required process to "earn" the pump even if our endo might have been that way a little bit.

    Pumps are a modern technological wonder to me and I love the flexibility and freedom it's given our son, but they are gadgets and they break, kids have skin issues, etc....
    I like to have back-up plans for my back-up plans, so to me, it's a good thing that we all understand how to manage it either way and are comfortable doing it. Just my two cents.
     
  18. slpmom2

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    I don't know about right at diagnosis, but a week later would have been nice. :cwds: as it is, we pushed our endo and were pumping by 4 months.
     
  19. emm142

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    For me, it's not that injections are cheaper or older, but that injections were EASIER. My control wasn't as good, but the actual process was SO much easier. Doing injections for a while allowed me to get my head around simple things like the distinction between basal and bolus.

    Diagnosis was really hard. Pump start was hard. Combining the two would probably have made me crazy(er than I already am).

    (I can see that this might be very different for young children, especially those who require incredibly small dosages. As always, YDMV. But I'm glad they didn't offer me a pump at dx. I know I would have taken it. And probably gone insane. ;))
     
  20. chammond

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    This is exactly how we started, and as we felt more comfortable we began using more of the "extras". I think in our situation it is what worked best for us, but if he had been older and we were able to do MDI more easily, we probably would have.
     

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