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Do you wipe a dog's butt, and other dumb questions.

Discussion in 'Parents Off Topic' started by denise3099, Feb 14, 2012.

  1. denise3099

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    Originally Posted by denise3099
    Well, I have been doing research but wanted to make sure that what I think is like meshes with other ppl's actual experiences. I couln't imagine that the entire dog owning world has skid marks on their sofas or there'd be a huge market for dog pants. But I want to be able to reassure my son with actual expriences, exp. since my mom already told him about her own dog's care. :rolleyes:

    That said, if I found out that it was much messier and a lot more work than I had expected, yeah, it would definitely deter me. If you told me you cleaned up house pee and poop or vomit 3 times a week, I'd be surprised and would reconsider that. I think 3 accidents a week or one illness a week is a lot, but I don't get the impression that that's the case. That's why I really do want all the gory details. And yes, wiping a dog's butt after every poo would be a deal breaker for me. :( I'm really not into wiping any butt I didn't give birth too ;)
     
  2. caspi

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    Denise, you said you have found a dog that you love. How old is she? If she's grown, has she been trained and can you check her vet records to see if she has any issues? If she's a puppy, you will have work ahead of you.

    I think you are being smart to consider all aspects of dog ownership. It's not for everyone and only you can ultimately decide what is going to work for you and your family.
     
  3. denise3099

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    Thanks. We looked at a breeder who had like 10 dogs in her house and it was nuts and totally unpleasant and we left shaken. And then another breeder was in the area and brought Carmen to meet us. She'll be 8 months old and she's just beautiful. Even ds admits she's a great dog--he just isn't sure he wants to actually own her. All of her records are available as well as her parents records and genetic testing. She's been to puppy school and family dog school and knows some commands. She isn't "perfect" to show and doesn't have a great herding interest so the breeder says she'd make a good family dog. She's also being spayed next week. All of this takes a lot of the work out of the equation, but she is still a young dog and she will be with us for 10++ years so we want a realistic picture of what it's like.

    Oh, and she's crate trained too.
     
  4. MamaC

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    Just wanted to add that some dogs, perfectly well housebroken and adjusted, will have separation issues that lead to "anger accidents." Like maybe when you leave the dog and the 6 month old baby with a sitter for 3 hours and the dog decides a good place to relieve himself is on your bed...

    And my current dog would stand in front of my husband five minutes after I left the house and have an "accident" after he'd already done the deed outside.

    They're animals. They're unpredictable.
     
  5. caspi

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    Realistically speaking, at least from my experience owning dogs, you still have a good year of "puppyhood" ahead of you. Chewing, accidents, etc. Will the breeder allow you to take her home for a weekend to see how your son interacts with her? That might be something to consider.
     
  6. DsMom

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    :D:p:D:pLOL. What words of wisdom! So funny.
     
  7. Lee

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    I have one poodle that tinkles when she is afraid. So at least 3 times a week, I am cleaning up a puddle from a poodle.
     
  8. caspi

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    I forgot about that -- we once had a lab that would tinkle when he was excited, which in the first few years of his life was All. The. Time. We just got used to cleaning it up, lol. Guess you can say we had a leaking lab. ;)
     
  9. sooz

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    I can almost guarantee it is going to be much messier and a lot more work than you expect...but worth it.
     
  10. jules12

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    Pets are messy! Our dog is a puppy and when I was potty training her, I think I cleaned up messes everyday! Dogs cost money in vet bills, toys, food, etc. Our dog also turned out to be a digger. For about 4-5 weeks, I was bathing her 1-2 times a week because she would come in from outside with her snout and front paws covered in mud!!!

    She is a part of the family and we are committed to her and love her and therefore take the good, the bad, and the very very ugly in stride!!!!!
     
  11. denise3099

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    Eww. . . a poodle puddle, a leaky lab, and a poopy pom? :D My bil's dog eats its poo. :eek:

    That doesn't sound good. So far, Carmen doesn't seem to have these issues but I'm sure she won't like being away from her current owner. I hope you don't see me on the Dog Whisperer some day. ;) I would be sad to be picking up "excited" messes 3 times a week. I don't think I'd get Carmen if I knew this was an issue. I guess once you love them then you put up with a lot more.
     
  12. caspi

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    We usually have friends dog sit for us when we go on vacation. My dog hates going to the kennel. If it's someone new, we will take our dog to their house for a few hours a couple of times, so that he gets used to them. Is there any chance that Carmen's owners will allow this? Just a thought.
     
  13. Pauji5

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    We have a 60 pound Labradoodle, Ruby....and above is exactly us!The whole once in a while dingleberry....and she LOVES her cage. She goes in it when she wants to nap or get away. They only time we lock it is if she's really muddy, and once she's dried, she's out.

    Dogs can be gross, but honestly, it's not bad. I think it would be great for your son. And I HIGHLY recommend Labradoodles!!!! Very even temptered, loving, calm and a good size to lay on!!!!!
     
  14. Mommy For Life

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    We have a mini/small labradoodle 15lbs. She just turned 1 year this weekend. Great family dog! :D The first month or so was a typical for a puppy. We got up in the middle of the night the first 2 weeks to let her out for a pee. Since her 1st night home she was in her kennel @ night and when we leave the house in the day. I have never wiped her butt....muddy paws yes...but the butt no way! :rolleyes: I think you son just needs to know that animals get dirty, but they don't require a butt wipe...only babies and really old folks need that! :eek:
     
  15. AJMom

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    We live on a small farm and have 'farm dogs'. They don't come in the house (and don't want to - DD tries all the time to drag them in). They get all their shots and regular grooming (but then immediately roll in mud or horse poop). They are both big 40# and 80#. One doesn't bother the other animals, the other has an issue and always wants in the chicken house, chases the horses and goats. They have never left our property. They sleep in a heated/AC garage, coming in and out as they want. They are GREAT dogs and play with all the kids that come here! They also 'do their job' and bark when someone shows up and keep the coyotes away.

    We love our dogs! Not sure I'd ever NOT have a dog!
     
  16. Lee

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    Lucy only tinkles if she thinks she is getting in trouble. But that didn't start to happen until she was a bit older.

    Before getting the dog you need to honestly answer - to yourself - what you are going to do if this dog happens to have an 'issue' - whatever that issue will be.

    I have a friend who picks up dogs like coats and then gives them away at the first sign of a problem. Not only is this cruel to the dog, but it is devastatingly painful to her children.

    When you decide to get a dog, you have to be committed to see it through.
     
  17. wilf

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    The smaller the dog, the smaller the possible messes. :)

    I've never heard of anyone wiping a dog's butt. :eek:

    Great title for a thread..:D
     
  18. danismom79

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    Ah, that's what cats are for.
     
  19. mmgirls

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    No help, but THANK YOU for the laugh. I needed it
     
  20. Bigbluefrog

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    Sounds like childbirth:eek:

    That statement fits in so many areas, raising children or puppies. They ARE messy and work but that is why they are made so cute. Well worth the effort.

    We have a new puppy here, she is almost 16 weeks. I just walked her 2 miles, cleaned up the yard which was full of poop, then washed her muddy paws, and we both napped.

    We crate train our dog, it is safe haven for her and keeps the house intact when we leave. I haven't wiped her butt, but what is the difference picking up or wiping it's all messy stuff that needs to be done.
     

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