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Do you wipe a dog's butt, and other dumb questions.

Discussion in 'Parents Off Topic' started by denise3099, Feb 14, 2012.

  1. denise3099

    denise3099 Approved members

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    So sorry, but I have a lot of dumb questions and some damage control to do. My mother has told my son lots of dumb stuff, like she wipes her dog's butt and if you keep a dog in a crate for more than half an hour it'll get arthritis. So now my son, who has Asperger's and is somewhat rigid, doesn't want a dog! I think it will be so good for him on so many levels, plus we're all in love with the dog and want her. So I've been looking up stuff on line and encouraging him to do so.

    I've found no link re the arthritis. I also found lots of ppl who say No Way to wiping unless the dog is ill. And we looked up some anatomy facts. But Mom insists she sees ppl wiping dog butts all the time. DS now thinks of a dog as a walking butt hole and thinks having a dog must be unsanitary without the benefit of pants. He's somewhat sqeemish and germ phobic, verging on OCD at times, intermittant hand-washer, etc.

    So how gross is it to own a dog? Is it like with kids, a constant bathing of bodily fluids? Is it all the poo, pee, spit up, drool, blood, and guts of raising toddlers? Are dogs spitting up every time you turn around or leaving "skid marks" on all your furniture? I wish I was kidding but I'm totally not. :eek:
     
  2. emm142

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    Haha, no we don't wipe either of our dogs' butts. EVER. And they're fine with that. They're not allowed on the furniture so no issues there. Gus has never been in a cage, but Rosie sleeps in a cage all night (we did it to toilet train her, and it has worked really well - she just barks during the night if she needs someone to take her outside to the toilet and has never had an accident in her cage) and I've never seen anything about arthritis links... As long as you get a big enough cage that they can stand up in I would have thought it's fine. They do puke occasionally (mostly if they've got hold of food they shouldn't eat) but it's not a daily, or even weekly, thing.
     
  3. Connor's Mom

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    My brother in law had a bull dog and they do need to wipe it's butt. I have 2 golden retrievers and as long as the fur along their tails is trimmed I do not need to worry about anything following them back into the house. I have crated my dogs longer than half an hour and neither one of them has arthritis. I had a dog we never crated that had severe arthritis. It depends on the dog.

    We, unfortunately, have one of our dogs that eats her own poo. Yep, it's gross and I won't let her give me kisses unless I brush her teeth. That's my germ-a-phobia. I also wash my hands after petting them but, again, that's just me.

    We, meaning I, clean up the yard weekly so that it doesn't get too bad. We taught the dogs to go in 2 areas and for the most part they stick to those spots which is nice.

    Good luck!
     
  4. Lee

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    I would have the entire family watch some videos on dog ownership. No - you do not have to wipe a dogs butt.

    But you do need some basic knowledge on the care and maintenance of dog ownership.
     
  5. StillMamamia

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    Nope, never wiped my dogs' butts ever. They go out to pee/poop and that's it. The pee/poop falls in a nice straight line.;) Then they lick themselves when they get home.:D

    My dogs have been allowed on the couch since day 1. We don't mind, but it's easier if you have leather couches for the clean-up.

    Potty training can be as frustrating as potty training a toddler, though I found my dogs picked up the technique much faster.;) But it takes time and patience, and it is doable, so...

    We've never had a crate, just a dog "bed" (a hard plastic thing with a comfy dog pillow in it).

    Puking happens, as with humans, but not that often, though dogs either just puke right there, or they give that "ack-ack-ack" sound and you need to rush them outside for them to puke. Peeing accidents can happen during potty training (not sure why I'm calling it potty training, but anyway...), and they can happen if 1) the dog is alone a long time without going out 2) if the dog is sick and 3) if the dog hates the rain (have one of those).

    A dog needs time, affection and walking. And food and water.

    Good luck.
     
  6. DsMom

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    Gotta say, I had dogs my entire childhood...and never once saw my mom wipe their butts!:eek: Am SOOO with your son...that would be totally disgusting...and is totally not necessary. However, picking up their poop in yards and on walks IS required...so, it that's too much for your son, it's something to consider. Never heard of the arthritis thing...but I would not choose to own a dog if you think it will spend a large amount of time in a crate...1/2 hour is no big deal. Some dogs choose to retreat to their crates as a safe "den" and will rest in them with the door open. If a dog was crated for large amounts of time every day, however, I can't imagine that would be good for them.

    Honestly, though, some things about dogs are gross. We had dogs that would want to eat their own poop at times...not sure what that was about.:confused: If you get a puppy, housetraining is messy. Skidmarks DID occur on rugs rarely...sorry. And, the occasional upset stomach will also result in a mess on the rug. Things may get chewed and ruined. Some hunting type dogs may like to catch and then proudly "share" furry treasures they've caught outside! To me, and I'm sure to millions of dog lovers, these things were worth it to share such a loyal and loving companion. There is nothing like coming home to that wagging tail and happy face knowing there is no one in the world they'd rather see than YOU!

    But, the mess may be a big deal or even deal breaker considering your son's needs. It's good you're doing your research...and I would continue to do so. There's nothing worse than bringing a dog home and then finding out it's not working out...heartbreaking for the dog and for those who get attached and don't want to say good-bye. I'd be sure your son is honestly aware of the realities of dog ownership. You want the dog to have a good home...if it's not yours...it's better to let it find another where it will be happy.:cwds:

    Good luck!
     
  7. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I think you are just messing with us now. :rolleyes:

    Honestly, if you're asking questions like that, I think you should not own a dog.
     
  8. denise3099

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    I'm not even messing with you all, I swear. We watch Dog Whisperer and other dog shows but they never show the gross stuff. And how will you know this stuff if you don't ask? That's why I'm asking, so I know for sure what we can deal with rather than bring a dog home expecting sunshine and unicorns and finding I'm stepping in poo every day. I really think too many people don't know this stuff and are shocked when they bring the new "baby" home.

    I've changed more peed sheets than I care to remember, cleaned more bloody noses than I even can remember, and have wiped my share of hineys, not to mention the thousdands of diapers. DD used to spit up after EVERY meal as an infant! And my old couch had vomit down the side of it for like a year--we just gave up trying to keep it clean and finally threw it out and bought one with slip covers. Motherhood is not for the squeemish, but all the commercials show are cherub faced little angels! Surprise, it should be on "Dirty Jobs." :eek: I just want to know what we're getting into.

    Oh, and if you think a dirty diaper is bad, try cleaning up a dirty potty! It's enough to want to make you leave them in diapers until college. :D This is stuff nobody tells you at the baby shower.
     
  9. DsMom

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    Really??:confused: I think she is being responsible and smart...especially considering her son's needs. If more people would do their research and ask questions before bringing that cute little puppy home on an impulse, there would be fewer returned and unwanted dogs and other pets in the shelters.
     
  10. danismom79

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    Will this determine whether you'll still want a dog?
     
  11. denise3099

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  12. sooz

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    Puppies are one thing and older dogs are another. Old dogs who cannot make it to the outside do wind up pooping in the house, often in the middle of the night because they can't help it, and you do wind up stepping in it because you can't see it. I have never wiped a dog's butt, but cleaning up poop from inside and outside is a real chore, especially if your kids like to play outside. It draws flies and other insects as well. Your dog might get worms, you will have a lot a lot of vet bills over the years. You will need to find someone to care for your dog if you travel, or spend a lot on boarding. Dogs do drool sometimes, they want to lick your face, they vomit, they get diarrhea when they are sick or eat the wrong thing,they do sometimes skid along the floor on their butts, they can destroy your furniture or other precious possessions by chewing them. If you get a big dog, one that weighs more than you can lift, it will be a problem when the get old or sick because you will have a hard time getting them in the car. You will need a car that can accommodate the dog if it is big too. Big dogs equal big poop. Even dog food can be expensive if your dog turned out to need special food having said all that, I am a dog lover, and I never minded all of that stuff, but I can see how it might be a shock to someone who never had a dog. The final thing that should be said for reality's sake, is how hard it is to have to have your dog put down when that is the kindest option left. It will scar your heart forever. I still miss my dog and wish she were here every day.
     
  13. mandapanda1980

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    Alot of dog care is going to depend on the breed of dog you get. A dog such as a mastiff drool alot. And dogs with short snouts like pugs can have breathing/nose/snot issues. Done shed, others don't. You need to research research research the type of dog you want. And be aware that different kind of dogs are probe to certain problems such as arthritis as they get older. Each dog is different. But I think it us a great companion and your family will love it :)
     
  14. pianoplayer4

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    two dogs, two goats, a cat, used to have 25-30 chickens and a flock of ducks, plus a cow for a little while, never wiped any butts=)

    We have one big dog (mutt named maggie) and one small one (bicion named maybelle) Maybelle poops and pees in the house if we dont take her out... I've only stepped in poop once though. Maggie we could leave for twelve + hours (she doesn't go in a crate) and she would be fine. Maybelle has a crate and sleeps in it if she doesn't "go" out side before bed, we've left her in her crate for up to 7hrs (we were at church) but if we do that she gets very hyper and goes crazy for a while....
     
  15. mom24grlz

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    We have a lab and never once had to wipe her butt. Thank goodness! i'd make my husband do that job LOL! Picking up her stink bombs around the yard are bad enough:D Pheww can't give that dog chicken. My mom has a chihuahua and does have to express her anal glands because the dog can't do it on her own.
     
  16. StillMamamia

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    Just a small note about older dogs and their "accidents". Keep them in one place at night, with doors closed to limit the ick factor.

    My only advice is to n ot expect a perfect dog which will not drool/pee/poop/puke/jump/bark/whine/etc. Some ikcs are bound to happen, no matter how trained they are. It is just how it is. They're living things and "caca" ;) happens sometimes. You might want to have a professional dog trainer to work with you and your kid at first. Maybe that will be reassuring to all.
     
  17. wildemoose

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    I certainly don't wipe my dog's butt, but occasionally if his hair gets too long (he's got a golden retriever-type coat with a very fluffy butt area) I'll have to pull a "dingleberry" off him or I'll find one on the floor...ew.

    If you feed your dog the right kind of food, cleaning up poop shouldn't be too gross. We had to switch our dog's brand to one with a higher fiber content because he was having lots of loose stools, and now they're no problem to deal with.

    Our dog loves his crate and sleeps in there with the door open. It really helped his confidence when we got it for him because now he knows he has a secure place to retreat to. (He was a rescue and came to us with some insecurity issues, which are pretty much gone now.) We only ever lock him in for very brief periods of time, like if there's someone at the door and we don't want him jumping up on them. We got him at a year old, though, so he was no longer a puppy and already housebroken.
     
  18. caspi

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    First of all, I have to say that this is the funniest title of a thread that I have seen here in a long time! :p

    I honestly can't imagine anyone thinking that having a baby is going to be smooth sailing and if they do, they probably are too clueless to even consider raising one. ;)

    Pets are no different. They require work, from day one. Puppies and potty training is time consuming and can make you want to pull your hair out. While we have never wiped any of our dog's butts, you do have to pick up after your dog, irregardless of if you are walking them on the street or they go in your backyard. They will have tummy problems sometimes and you will need to clean up vomit and what comes out of the other end as well. Then there is the hair to contend with if you have a dog that sheds a lot. I think you can see where I am going with all of this.... it's no walk in the park, no pun intended.

    Having said all this, I couldn't imagine my life without a dog in it. They bring such great joy and can be a great addition to a family, given you are ready and willing to put the time in.:cwds:
     
  19. denise3099

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    Actually ds even asked me about this. He's even more thorough and thinking ahead than I am. He's leaving no stone unturned in making this decision.
     
  20. Lindy

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    We have a yellow lab. I have had to pull a long string thingy hanging out from his back end...nasty stuff! My husband had to wipe our dog's butt once, because I ran in the other direction! The dog has puked (huge piles) in the house...He sleeps on our bed and is on the couch. We love him - it's part of the package! He also has arthritis - has had two knees replaced (bad genetics?)....and is only 4yrs old. $$$$ also part of the deal! Did I mention that we love him?! We are blessed!:eek::D
     

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