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Do You Keep Your Diabetes A Secret?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Richard157, Sep 5, 2015.

  1. Richard157

    Richard157 Approved members

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    Do You Keep Your Diabetes A Secret?

    A psychologist with diabetes discusses this in the article below. Starting in 1945 I did not tell anyone about my diabetes except my relatives, a few neighbors, and teachers in school. My mom did the telling, I kept quiet about it. People did not seem to know anything about diabetes wen I was young. My teachers had not heard of diabetes. I did not tell friends about it until college, but they did not understand it. I never really opened up about my diabetes until 2006, online, and in public. It was such a relief to come out of hiding and educate people about diabetes. I try to do that online, and in giving speeches to groups.

    If you keep your diabetes a secret, what is your reason for doing that?

    http://www.diabetesdaily.com/blog/2...a-secret/?mc_cid=81598db85c&mc_eid=6752318755
     
  2. njswede

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    My son is very open about his diabetes and so are my wife and I. I think he's a bit proud of how well he handles it. He kind of likes to show off the blood coming out of him when he tests, for example. I guess that's part of being a 7-year-old boy.

    Our reasoning is that the more people who know what's going on with him, the better. If something nasty were to happen, it's best if everyone around him knows what it is and has a basic idea of what to do.

    He just ran by. He's wearing two diabetes bracelets and a dog tag. I guess he's pretty open about it... :)
     
  3. mamattorney

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    I would say my daughter is somewhat neutral on this issue. She doesn't hide it by any stretch of the imagination (wears her dexcom on her arm and her pump site in plain sight on her thighs), but she's not shouting about it from the rooftops either. Anyone who knows her is aware she has it, but in public she keeps things on the down low. She rarely tests in public - I'm lucky she tests before lunch at school. Otherwise, so long as her dexcom is not alarming, she just doses for carbs.
     
  4. DiabetesMama

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    I encouraged my son to be completely open about it because I didn't want him to think it was something to be embarrassed about. I showed him exactly what to do and we sit and do his testing at restaurants and other public places. I sometimes glance around, and believe it or not, there are usually not that many people even watching. I wanted him to be confident and not think that it is anything to be ashamed of. He is such a brave kid anyway so I don't think that any awkward lookers would shake his confidence anyway. Any comments we ever got were VERY positive and how amazing the technology has become. People are pretty understanding I think, but kids are always more interested when he gets his stuff out. At church, he has made diabetes not so scary for the kids who know him. He is making the world a better place, one finger stick at a time! :triumphant:
     
  5. Mimikins

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    I'm not ashamed of it and will gladly perform any diabetes-related tasks out in public (and I love wearing my infusion sets in my arm and thighs), but it's not like I tell everyone I know that I'm diabetic. If someone sees me testing and asks, then I'll be more than happy to talk to them about it.

    I'm surprised at how involved my university is with the T1 community (my nursing school hosts an annual day camp for T1s as a part of the accelerated curriculum), and I feel like that's a major influence on my openness about my diabetes.
     
  6. Megnyc

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    I don't advertise it but I don't hide it either. I typically test in my lap. I had someone the other day (who I lived with for several weeks and sit next to for 8+ hours a day in class ) comment it was the first time she had seen me test my blood sugar. I have checked at least 100 times directly in front of her so perhaps I am more discrete than I thought. I will wear pump sites visibly. In general if someone specifically asks a question I am happy to answer it. I have no issues though saying I don't want to talk about something if I don't feel like it. I had a professor a few weeks ago ask if I was willing to speak about living with diabetes to my class (in med school). I declined since I have zero desire for the entire school to know me as "the diabetic." Also, I don't really feel my experience living with diabetes is necessarily representative of the average person with type 1.
     
  7. KatieSue

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    My kiddo is pretty open. She doesn't want to be a walking diabetic billboard but she doesn't hide anything. She wears her pods on her arms, tests whenever, wherever. She was diagnosed at 13 and I was worried about her being embarrassed at that age but she never really has been. I didn't want her to be ashamed, why should she? Also I figured, as another poster said, the more people who knew the better. They may not know what to do but I figured they could at least call 911 and say she's diabetic help.

    She's in college now and going through a little bit of a burnout phase. She's also decided to get more involved in the diabetic community, something she was very opposed to previously. She's working on starting a College Diabetic Network chapter at her school. She's mentioned that now being an "adult" she needs more support from her diabetic peers than she did before.
     
  8. msschiel

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    We don't advertise it, but we don't hide it either. Most family and friends know and I would prefer they know in case of an emergency. He was nearly 11 at diagnosis and went to a sleep over a few months after being diagnosed. I guess all of his friends were really interested when he was doing his thing. He had to take shots at the football game the other night, one for his snack and his levemir. It didn't bother him and no one said anything as far as I know. My dad has never hid his from anyone and takes his shots whenever and wherever he needs to.

    How he deals with it when he gets older is up to him, but for now we tell the people that need to know (teachers, friends and family, etc.)
     
  9. Richard157

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    Thanks for the replies to this discussion. In modern times it seems that being open about our having diabetes is advisable. In my early years it was not so advisable since s little was known about it, and people did not understand.
     

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