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Do you check your childs BG during the night?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by bandmkolb, Oct 5, 2011.

  1. Ellie'sMama

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    We always check our daughter throughout the night. At midnight then again between 3-4am depending on the previous reading and possible correction. Sometimes she's checked again at 6am when one of us is getting up for work and then again prior to breakfast. Our endo also told us not to check her through the night, only at 3 am if we were really worried. Are they kidding?!? When wouldn't we be worried?? We've caught way too many unexpected lows in the middle of the night to ever stop checking.
    The endos are very smart but they don't live and breathe it like we parents do. ALWAYS trust your instincts.
     
  2. MamaBear

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    Every night. Regular times are 11:00 or 11:30pm and 3:00 or 3:30am. Of course if we find any lows or highs to be treated then we recheck as needed. With everything else that goes along with Diabetes, it varies.;)

    This is exactly the way I see it. Just because he is sleeping, doesn't mean his Diabetes is sleeping too. It's still up to no good!

    I agree! It really bothers me every time I see a new parent (well newer than I am at this) posting that their endo told them they don't have to check, and that kids wake up if they are low. :rolleyes: It really makes me a little bit angry for these parents and I just don't see any sense in advising them this way.
     
  3. Beach bum

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    When asked this question here, my standard response is "would you go that long during the day without checking?" Something to consider.

    The amount of times I check depends on what she has done during the day. Last night for example she had dance after dinner, never went low, but never went above 100. During the day that wouldn't phase me in the least, but at night it does concern me. So, she was checked 2x's during the night.

    This definitely is a personal choice. You will get many varying opinions here.
     
  4. lisamustac

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    Night check before I go to bed at 11. Followed by a 2&5 check. My endo also thinks its not necessary to do night checks all the time.
    Ds usually has good night numbers but two nights ago at 2 he was 45:eek: with Cgm trending down. No IOB,increased activity or anything else I could think of.
    I'm glad I got up to treat that low. Diabetes doesn't play fair and IMO we have to be on guard.
     
  5. Beach bum

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    You can say that again!
     
  6. thebestnest5

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    We check every night. It was honeymoon, end of honeymoon, growing, insulin changes, activity, illness, new food, late supper, carb count guess, etc...

    There's not a night that I can trust diabetes will not wreak bg havoc.

    And, now I see the combination of puberty and diabetes, and that does not make predictable blood sugars.
     
  7. DsMom

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    When my son was first dx and on MDI, we only checked if he was ill or if there was a change to his Lantus, as we were told. He was almost always high at night because we never really got his Lantus right in the year we did MDI. When we first started on the pump, I would check him at 10:30p, but rarely during the night after we got the basal rates right. I do check him now at night if the 10:30p number warrants it or if I have made a change, which is relatively often. I keep his numbers lower than I used to be comfortable doing. And of course during sickness or after a lot of exercise...I was up a lot this summer! I am not in the camp of checking every couple of hours no matter what just because, although D is definitely not sleeping...my child is not eating or exercising during the night. (Unless I give a juice box, in which case I will check later!) It is not the same as if I would not check him for 8 hours during the day.

    You do have to do what feels right to you...what everyone else does might be a guide, but should not be your deciding factor. My son definitely has a better A1c since I've been checking more often at night. But I frankly would not be able to function during the day if I were up every two hours every night. I am generally comfortable with his basal rates, and do not feel that I am putting his life at risk if I sleep at night. If I am uneasy, I get up...if things seem okay, I don't.
     
  8. 5kids4me

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    Like you, we followed the endos recommendation of checking at night for the first 3 wks (at 3 AM) then we were told to stop checking. Then I started reading this forum. To be honest, I figured the parents who tested multiple times a night were overprotective and to prove it to myself, I started checking. And guess what? The parents here were right! I caught crazy numbers-mostly highs that needed correcting- but some lows. A couple were scary lows. The doctor told us Josh would wake up if his bg went low. Umm, that hasn't ever happened! Even using the dexcom now, I still check bg at least 1 time (more if I don't trust the sensor-even though they have been very accurate for us). 2 endos have given us a hard time about checking too much at night. I just smile and remind them of the highs/lows I have caught and that I will continue to do what I feel is best.
     
  9. ecs1516

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    Yes, every night. If high or low then a recheck later. IF CGM is on then only if it goes off.
     
  10. Christopher

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    Yes, however, out of the hundreds of variables that effect a person with diabetes blood glucose, food and exercise are only 2.
     
  11. nanhsot

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    I'll weigh in here as more of an "other" option. My child is older (17) and clearly that factors in as I am beginning to work with him on transitioning to adulthood and figuring out how he'll manage without me. That time will be here very quickly!

    My son has a CGM and I often do set an alarm and check CGM at least once per night, more if things are awry in some way. I don't wake unless needed. During football season I check without question, set an alarm at least once and often more. During off season we judge on a day by day basis. With the CGM we can see trending and if he's healthy, no viruses on the horizon, hasn't eaten anything weird or unpredictable, and otherwise is having a good day, I may not check. If I'm up for whatever reason (late night online, up early to work, etc) then I do check cgm quietly, but I don't generally ask for a finger poke unless warranted by situation.

    I do think age factors in, and those of you with younger children can look at this and think "no way, I'll check until they leave my home"....well, you're not walking in my shoes yet, so wait and see, judge not until you are there. It's a fine balance in my world between independence and safety, and you have to walk that line carefully. I trust my son with his diabetes and have told him I will continue to do so until/unless he shows he can't be trusted. So unless there are indicators that he's going to have a bad night (and we're getting pretty good at predicting those), a check is not done.

    Right now checks are regular and needed due to sports. Other times not so much. CGM has been a big factor in both having me check MORE often and checking less at times.
     
  12. KatieSue

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    Maybe it's an age thing too, my daughter is 15. We only check her when she's low/high at bedtime. Last night for instance she was 56 at bedtime so I checked her at 2. She HATES it when we wake her up to check at night and she won't let us do it for her. If we need to, yes we do it, but if she's got a good number at bedtime and nothing else going on, then no we don't.
     
  13. Jazziesmom

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    Yes, at least twice, this is why we are looking into sensors for safety reasons as she is quite brittle and unpredictable when she sleeps and naps
     
  14. nanhsot

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    Same here, I HAVE to wake him fully up, which is hard, he refuses to allow me to test him at night! He's very adamant about poking/injecting himself.
     
  15. DsMom

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    Granted...which is why I do check if I feel those other variables are at play. I just don't feel like a parent should be feeling they are putting their child at risk or being a bad D parent, minus these other variables, if they sleep at night. Not checking during the day is tantamount to neglect...I don't think it's fair to compare that to not checking at night. My sister raised a healthy, thriving daughter with minimal night checks. I'm sure this is the same of thousands of other parents. DIB is a terrifying possibility, but from what I've learned, including here, very rare. We risk our children more in our cars every day, and sadly, kids even die participating in sports. But I still drive my child in my car and let them play baseball.:cwds: In search of a perfect A1c, yes, night checks every night would be essential. But I am not going to expect my child to wake up every 2 hours when he is an adult to check his BG...I want to teach him to be prudent and safe, but to live his life...including his sleep time!
     
  16. emilyblake

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    We definitely still check at least once overnight, more often twice.

    Lila wears a CGM, but we still check.
     
  17. hawkeyegirl

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    DIB is very low on the list of reasons why I check my child at night. (Well, he wears a CGM, so we only check if it alarms, but if he doesn't have it on, we check at least a couple of times.) Lows are unhealthy, highs are unhealthy, and I hope to avoid the horror of waking up to my child having a seizure. The simple fact of the matter is that if you do not check every night, you will have undetected lows and highs. If you're comfortable with that, fine. I am not, so we wear the CGM basically 24/7, and when it's not working, we check.

    What he does when he's an adult is his own choice, and irrelevant to my decision to always check at night.
     
  18. BittysMom

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    What's "DIB"? Diabetes induced...?
     
  19. Amy C.

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    It is with sadness that I realize that a parent of a newly diagnosed parent is just being introduced to the Dead in Bed syndrome. This drives many parents to test at night, but not all.

    http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/d_0n_g00.htm
     
  20. Cdpimpinella

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    We test multiple times during the night...11pm...2am...5ish am...
    Like a previus poster said...would you go 8+ hours during the day without testing?:eek: I sleep much better knowing what number she is at...even if it is only 2 hours of uninterupted sleep.
     

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