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Do all T1D's become hypo unaware over time?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by minniem, Dec 28, 2011.

  1. Timmy Mac

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    I'm not sure if that's true or not, but 14 years in, I'm still feeling mine just fine.
    I'm probably in the minority here, but I'll wake up from any moderate low (like, below 60). For me, theres a huge difference between just feeling *tired* and being *low* I'll wake up with a cold sweat and an adrenalin rush... not fun.
     
  2. Sassy

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    My son sometimes feels his lows and other times he doesn't. Just now for his before lunch BG he was 67, he felt fine. Last week when he was 75 he started feeling shaky. Weird how that happens...
     
  3. emm142

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    Just wondering - how do you know? If you slept through a low and woke up in normal range, surely you'd be totally unaware that it had happened... the only lows you know about are the ones you wake up to.
     
  4. Timmy Mac

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    well, the few times that I do check myself at night,like after a basal change or If I ate a tricky meal close to bed, I'll either be fine, high (those dont wake me up), or I will wake up with a low before the alarm goes off. I've never had a night check where I had a 45 without knowing about it.

    There might be a few that I've slept through, I guess we'll never know for sure.
     
  5. Lee

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    It is completely obvious. Here is the post of when we were in the hospital. This was her first seizure and we had no idea what was going on. She could barely walk and couldn't speak at all. She has had a few more and is always extremely disoriented and has difficulty moving. We have had 3 positive seizures and 2 that I kept her home from even though we weren't sure. She had trouble moving an arm and was foggy and feeling cruddy.

    It takes about 8 hours for the brain and the body to recover enough glucose from a seizure.

    http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com/showthread.php?t=40222&highlight=seizure
     
  6. mysweetwill

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    Our diabetes team has a child life specialist who is there to help our son adjust to the many changes in his life since diagnosis. He has met with her each time we have an appt. again, to be clear, she never told us not to test at night, in fact, this office encourages night time testing. All I know is my son has been able to rest at night since her assurances to him, I'd rather he not know, at 10 yrs old, all the possible awful things that can happen due to this dreaded thing that has invaded our lives, I'd much rather have the burden of worry!
     
  7. Christopher

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    But she did tell him that his body will wake him up when he is low and that just is not an absolute truth. If you want to lie to him and tell him he will wake up from lows at night, then that is your choice, I am not judging. I just wanted to make sure that you, as the responsible parent, knew that it is not absolutely true. It is a wrong and potentially dangerous assumption. It sounds like you are checking him at night so that is good.
     
  8. mysweetwill

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    She gave him info that was not an absolute truth as you said. That much is clear. I certainly plan on finding out from her what her thinking was but i am sure it was to allay the fears of a child, which is not to say it was the right way to go about it...But your next comment... Are you saying that since I didn't tell my newly diagnosed 10 yr old that her info wasn't absolutely true, I am now lying to him? Call me a liar then. Perhaps 6 weeks in you feel that telling a child he could go to sleep and never wake up is responsible parenting but I do not. My point was that he will soon enough learn all of the possible complications he can encounter in his life, he is a worrier as it is, im glad he at least can have sleep.
     
  9. Christopher

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    As a parent you know your child best and what the best way to deal with them is. What I or anyone else say really shouldn't matter to you.

    Each parent needs to figure out the best way to discuss diabetes with their child and there really is no right or wrong way. Most people choose to do it gradually, depending on many factors, like age, maturity level, etc.

    I would never suggest that telling a child, especially a newly dx one, that they may go to sleep and never wake up. That is horrible. But there are many ways to explain things that are more kind and gentle. For example, Mom needs to check you at night to make sure your blood sugar stays in range. It is the truth but it is not too detailed.

    My main issue was with what the "child life specialist" told your son (and that was inferred to you). It was wrong and dangerous.

    If I offended you I apologize.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2011
  10. buggle

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    My son almost always feels his lows when he's awake. In March, he'll be 4 years post-dx. Recently, he woke with a low -- the *first* and only time he has ever done this. We use a CGM and we also check his BG several times most nights.

    He was 8 when diagnosed and he realized right away that he could die during the night from a low, just from using logic and putting it all together. We reassured him then that we'd watch over him and he's not afraid. I get scared if we sleep through CGM alarms or alarm clocks. I feel a huge responsibility to keep him safe. Instead of Dawn Phenomenon, he's been tending to drop low in the early morning hours recently.

    We don't even see a CDE. I'm sure there are some great, knowledgeable CDEs out there, but I can't believe the misinformation so many of them pass out to parents. From my own experience and the experiences of other parents on this forum, I think it's rare for children to wake from lows. Diabetes is a dangerous disease and giving parents the wrong information could cost our children their lives. Even if we do everything right, there's still the potential for tragedy. But getting the wrong advice is way too common and that's one reason why other parents get upset when they hear that a supposed professional is telling parents stuff like this.
     
  11. 3kidlets

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    I know three adult type 1s - all have had it for over 20 years. One being my father in law who has had Type 1 for 30 something years. None of them feel their lows, though all were able to for quite some time. One of them wears a CGM. The other two do not. My father in law has not felt lows for many many years. It is a frightening thing. He becomes disoriented, beligerent, and is not able to help himself when it gets to this point. I seriously question his doctors and why they have not told him about the CGM. He knows nothing about it other than what I have told him. He is still on Regular and NPH and experiences many lows, every day. Though his health is good, I think his quality of life would be much better if his doctors weren't in the stone age!
     
  12. Ali

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    40 years T1 and I still feel lows. YDMV.:cwds:Ali
     
  13. Darryl

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    Leah is 5 years today with d and two things have not changed since dx: She always feels lows in the 60 or under range while awake, and she never feels, wakes, or rebounds from lows while sleeping, no matter how low.
     
  14. mysweetwill

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    Thank you, but apology not necessary, I hear where you are coming from.
     
  15. DsMom

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    I hope I can reassure you with my niece's experience. She is now 30, and has had D since she was 2...and she still feels lows. In fact, she says she even has certain types of weird dreams at night, depending if she is high or low, that wake her up and prompt her to test!

    I'm sure this is very individualized, and for someone to make such a blanket statement to you is wrong and has probably caused unneeded stress for you.:( My son was dx at 4, and at first did not feel his lows. He moved on to being extremely accurate with feeling them. Now, he is probably about 80% correct...at times I think he feels "shaky" when his BG is dropping or rising quickly and, even though he is not low when I check him, I use it as an indicator to check a little later to see what is going on.

    Not sure if this is true, but I've heard that those who have chronic lows can over time not feel them as accurately because that low feeling becomes a "normal" feeling. But being vigilant about testing BG and making needed insulin changes should avoid constant lows.

    As in everything, your child with D is an individual. Listen and learn from those whose experience you trust, but you'll learn the most from your own child and what works for him/her.:)
     
  16. 3kidlets

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    I have heard that about the constant lows as well. That you lose the ability to tell since your body becomes use to being low. I wonder sometimes if this is what is going on with my father in law. He has had T1 for over 30 years and he is still on NPH and Regular. He goes low a lot. A lot more than my daughter ever does. So I"m wondering if 30 years of this has causes his inability to detect lows. However, I have also heard about nerve damage caused by long term complication of D, which can also prevent you from feeling lows.
     

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