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Disney World Warning!!!

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Ivie's Mom, Jun 4, 2010.

  1. Kaylas mom

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    We had a GAC for Nick when we went to Disney a year ago Jan. His tho was a little different since it was his wish trip so we didn't have to ask for it, it was just there.

    I think it was a great thing to have, we didn't use it all the time but there were times when it was so helpful. Part of Nick's condition is that he tires so easily and he doesn't regulate his body temp well.. of course you think of Disney and think of heat but when we were there it was in the 40's!
     
  2. bensgirl

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    We are actually going to Disney World in August, were supposed to go this month, but had to be put back. We have been 12 times since Alexander was 3 1/2. Yes, you can say we are addicted to Disney! lol We have never used the Guest assistance cards, we do sometimes use the fast pass system. We have been different times of the year, but try to be extra careful and prepared when we go in the Summer months. We have learned each time we have went back, things that we could do to make it better.
    I am sorry that your trip to Disney turned included that, especially leaving the Magic Kingdom in tears. I hope your next trip will be better. :)
     
  3. hdm42

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    I just wanted to say "thank you" to Laura for looking into this, and I'll be interested to hear what WDW has to say.

    We used the GAC last year, and it was very helpful with the heat. Campbell went both low and very high at the park, and it was nice to not have to worry about long waits. Most of the rides just let us into the fast pass line with the GAC, and that was fine. As another poster mentioned, often the fast passes are gone by mid day, so having the GAC card was great.
     
  4. Caldercup

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    We used a GAC in certain situations -- as a 21-visit veteran of WDW, I know which lines are easy-to-leave and which aren't.

    For example, Toy Story Midway Mania's winding, airless queue is not a place I'd want to have to treat a severe low or have to beat a hasty retreat to get a kid out to a nearby bench. For that, we used the GAC -- as all FPs were gone within an hour of rope drop. (Even the FP line can be long, requires most guests to take stairs, and can be difficult to exit.)

    For most everything else, we planned for FPs and did fairly well, despite his BGs being all over the place, but mostly terribly low.

    If Disney did away with the GAC for T1Ds, it would be sad. (We'd still go, but it would be sad that my kid would lose out on *one more* thing because of a disease from which he can't take a vacation.)
     
  5. MissEmi

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    I've been to WDW twice since being dx'd with T1D and it has never crossed my mind to get the disability pass. I actually just got back :D. I've never had a problem not having one, but we plan like crazy, and use fastpasses as much as we can. We also try not to go when it is crazy busy either, but those are things we would do whether I had D or not. I know that with smaller kids it is harder, but I just use temp basals and carry plenty of candy on me, and I do fine. I'm just saying that not having one of those cards shouldn't "ruin" your vacation, there are ways to work around it:
    1) Go when it is not very crowded.
    2) Do not plan a trip when it is very hot.
    3) Use the fastpass system to your fullest advantage.
    4) Use temp basals if you are pumping.
    5) Check bg BEFORE entering a line, if bg is not above 120, eat a snack; adrenaline and walking will make it go down, so usually a high is not a worry. This has saved me many times. Of course, if you've just eaten, you don't really need to check, but if it's been over an hour, CHECK. Maybe it's a lot of checking, but it's worth it.

    With these tips, I've never had a problem with diabetes ruining my Disney vacations. Of course, if you have more than one health issue, by all means do what you have to do to get the card, but if you don't have to, DON'T. Of course my opinion is probably not very popular, but nevertheless, this is what I've experienced, and for me, it works. Maybe not for everyone, but trust me, not having the GAC does NOT ruin your WDW vacation...unless you don't plan of course.
     
  6. Melancholywings

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    Can I ask a question? Did you take the busses? Our last trip we stayed at POP which I loved - but it is known for having very over packed busses. In our 9 day stay we only got a seat once and that was because we left mid day. Pre T1D it wasn't a problem - but if she's low she needs to sit down and not stand on a moving bus. Have you had that issue? And do you have any tips?
     
  7. Omo2three

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    Thanks for sharing this info! Amb is 14 and will be going to WDW her freshman year...I was curious about the pass...and what it really does for you. Also I thought the pass gave you permission to bring medical supplies along...so u just bring your supplies no big deal with the lines or rides?

    FAst passes? I will look into that.
     
  8. Caldercup

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    Disney will allow you to bring medical supplies with you without requiring a special pass. If you use glass insulin vials, they will suggest that you take them to First Aid for storage, but I've never heard of them insisting on that. (It's a good idea, though, because they have A/C and fridges in the First Aid rooms.)

    As for bringing a bag on the ride, you can do that in every ride they have -- the vehicles have special compartments at your feet for storing a bag. If you need to bring a big cooler or anything larger than a backpack, you can rent a locker (or leave it at First Aid.)
     
  9. Nancy in VA

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    We have been 3 times since diagnosis and always stayed at Pop. If Emma needs to sit down we either wait on a bench at the bus stop or ask someone to get up. My mother also cant ride standing so we figure out how to make it work. I guess I'm in the camp of those who just figure out how to fit it into our life, constraints and all.
     
  10. jcanolson

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    That's what we have done. We did leave late one night, so there was a huge line. She was low, so I did go straight to the driver and explain our situation. He let Nat and I right on. People are usually perfectly willing to help if you make the problem known. My dh typically gets a seat and then ends up standing because some Mom with a baby or older person looks like they need the seat more.
     
  11. Melancholywings

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    Thanks for the info.

    All this Disney talk is making me want to pack my bags and go on vacation.
     
  12. MissEmi

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    I've never had a problem with the buses. Last week I had a low on the bus, and I was standing, but a man noticed my meter and asked me if I needed a seat, I said yes, my blood sugar was low, and he had his son get up and let me sit in his seat (The dad was standing already). The mom was very interested in everything, because she was at risk for T2, and wanted to know how mine was different, and how I managed my D. Usually if you ask someone for a seat, and state that it's medical, they'll get up. Never had a problem. At night if you wait until all of the crowds have dispersed and just look around the shops for awhile (they're open later than the attractions) most of the time you can avoid standing up.

    As far as supplies go, I've never had a problem (although I HAVE been on the pump both times I've gone) with the CMs. I carry either a hipster bag or a small backpack (it's about the size of a milk jug...although if I put a milk jug in it, it might not zip, it's PERFECT.) and sometimes they comment on all of the stuff I have, but they've never questioned my stuff. I keep everything except my meter in a clear pouch that zips with EMILY S------ EMERGENCY MEDICAL KIT on it in red permanent marker. I also carry a ziploc baggie for my pump for water rides, and in case of rain.

    CMs never have a problem with bags on rides. You can carry them in your lap, put them in the seat or floor of the car, and sometimes they have a net pouch for them. Actually the backpack I take has been on ALL 5 of the Disney trips I've been on---before AND after D. It's just the best little bag.

    I LOVE Disney World! :D. I already can't wait to go back!
     
  13. Seans Mom

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    5) Check bg BEFORE entering a line, if bg is not above 120, eat a snack; adrenaline and walking will make it go down, so usually a high is not a worry. This has saved me many times. Of course, if you've just eaten, you don't really need to check, but if it's been over an hour, CHECK. Maybe it's a lot of checking, but it's worth it.

    I completely agree with this, however, you've apparently never seen how fast a young childs bg can drop at an amusement park with heat, excitement and lots of walking.
    Sean actually has the Dexcom 7+ also. Even with testing before getting in line and the cgms..... by the time the ride was loaded and ready to start, which was the carousel so he was on one animal while I was behind him on another, he dropped to 57 from a good number (at this point in time I don't remember the test number). It was the fact that I had the Dex receiver with me and it vibrated to alert me of the low that let me know we needed to get off and quick. I did not want him passing out on a carousel animal going up and down. :eek:
    Luckily we were at Dollywood on a weekday and the lines were minimal, so once we treated and his number registered in range with the cgms showing an arrow rising, we were back on riding without a long wait.
     
  14. MissEmi

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    Oh I know it can drop like crazy, I've had those kinds of lows before, but it's just a little precaution that I've found works most of the time. Of course, with diabetes NOTHING works 100% of the time. I bet you were glad for the Dex when that happened! The unexpected will ALWAYS happen, it's almost a RULE. I just like a system or routine to go by, that's how I am :cwds:. A Dexcom would certainly be a handy tool at WDW though!!! Those arrows must be a great tool!
     
  15. Seans Mom

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    It's a very wonderful tool that has helped us a tremendous amount.
    Sean has been hypo and hyper unaware until just a couple months ago when he's started to realize that a "dizzy" feeling is usually a low or fast changing number.
    I think having the Dexcom help us keep him in range more often is part of the reason he's starting to become more aware.
    The Dexcom also alerted us to the problem of an overdose he rec'd at school last fall. Needless to say, I love the Dexcom 7+. :D
     
  16. KitKat

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    Ivie's Mom...Are you 100% sure the ADA's primary focus is type 2 diabetes? Where are you getting your statistics regarding their % to research?

    ADA is the only diabetes organization which hasn't suspended type 1 research due to the economy.
     
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2010
  17. Christopher

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    I did not realize all other diabetes organizations have suspended their research, hmmm....:confused:
     
  18. Marcia

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    I am sorry you had such a bad experience on your vacation. I do beg to differ with your take on the ADA-did you know the ADA runs the camps that many of our kids attend? Did you know that the ADA provides legal advocacy for our kids in school? Have you visited their planetD website for kids or taken time to read the national youth advocate's blog? Have you ever contacted your local ADA ?
     
  19. KitKat

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    Christopher, what I was told by our local JDRF chapter, JDRF was unable to fund research trials last year and this year. The were not funding new research. I should have said JDRF but was trying to be PC. I guess it didn't work. I was not including Faustman with the "diabetes organizations".
     
  20. Nancy in VA

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    JDRF did not suspend research due to the economy. Your chapter is mistaken. JDRF put more than $150M into research last year.
     

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