- advertisement -

Disabled

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by januaryblue, Oct 11, 2010.

  1. januaryblue

    januaryblue Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2009
    Messages:
    264
    This feels like a weird question, because I certainly don't think of my daughter as being disabled, but I know our children are protected under the Americans with Disabilities Act.

    My question is, I'm filling out forms so my daughter can join Girls Scouts and it asks, "Is your girl disabled?" Do I mark yes or no? It also asks, "Does she need accomodations?"

    My first inclination is to mark no. What do you think? This is the first time I've filled out a form like this and I had never thought about it before.
     
  2. Jeff

    Jeff Founder, CWD

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 1995
    Messages:
    1,548
    My recommendation would be to mark "No" but not that she has type 1 diabetes and needs to be able to check her blood sugar, treat lows and highs, and have a responsible adult trained in diabetes care.
     
  3. Jessica L

    Jessica L Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 9, 2010
    Messages:
    345
    I would mark yes on the accommodations. That is simply being aloud to test her BG and inject if needed. Also to make sure if you are not there someone knows what is up with her.
     
  4. StillMamamia

    StillMamamia Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2007
    Messages:
    13,195
    I would mark no for being disabled with an asterix for "see below" and add your comments to the accomodations area.
     
  5. Lee

    Lee Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Messages:
    9,633
    We fill out the BS form every year. I mark no for disabled and yes for special accommodations - such as testing before eating.
     
  6. Flutterby

    Flutterby Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2006
    Messages:
    14,623
    you have to be careful when filling out these forms.. the way you answer that question can have a lot of effect. I had to fill out a form for the school to accomidate Kaylee with gf food for lunch. The form HAD to be marked that she had a disability (celiac disease) or they WOULD NOT accomidate her. A lot of people don't mark the disability box and then the school WILL NOT accomidate. Same thing for SATs, ACTs and so forth.. you have to think beyond the scope of physical disability (which, I think, is what most people think of when the question comes up.).
     
  7. januaryblue

    januaryblue Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2009
    Messages:
    264
    Thanks everyone. It didn't give much space to explain anything, but I sqeezed it into the margins that she needed to test her sugar and inject insulin. I have a feeling I will probably stay at the meetings with her at this point.
     
  8. Amy C.

    Amy C. Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    5,560
    I am not sure how Girl Scouts work, but cub scouts and boy scouts have lots of volunteers working with the boys. I am not sure the appropriate people would even be notified if you didn't tell them yourself.
     
  9. frizzyrazzy

    frizzyrazzy Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2006
    Messages:
    14,141
    It's similar with girl scouts. Tell the leaders don't just use the forum, mostly n o one is going to look at those forms.

    I would NOT expect a volunteer leader to be willing to do a whole lot of accommodations as far as being a trained person to care for your child's diabetes. I would however, offer to be a volunteer leader yourself so that you can do what needs to be done.
     
  10. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    I would mark yes and list the accommodations she needs.

    I don't think of my son as "disabled", but the fact remains that he has a disability under federal law, and the only way I can get the accommodations that I need for him is to acknowledge that.
     
  11. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    My daughter is in scouts, and I mark no for disabled, but on the health form, they give a fairly good amount of space to detail health conditions.
    As for accomodations, I would just note that she may need water/restroom and snack breaks based on her blood sugar.

    At this time, I cannot let my daughter be alone, not because I don't trust her, but because there are too many kids (12) and she could easily fall through the cracks. So, I was a volunteer leader and now I've somehow gotten myself roped into being one of the leaders:eek:
    We are lucky because our troop has 3 leaders so it's a 1:4 ratio for leaders/girls.

    It's best to tell the leader in person about your daughter and supply them with all neccessary emergency info if you are leaving her unattended. With GS the leaders are supposed to have a copy of health/emergency forms on hand at all meetings, but it doesn't mean that they may read them. You hope they do, though.
    When you received your registration packet, you should have received a health form also, though some hold off until the first meeting to pass these out. You can go to http://www.girlscouts.org/program/gs_central/forms/ for it, or your local council may have one tailored to there specifications (ours does).
     
  12. virgo39

    virgo39 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2010
    Messages:
    1,691
    I don't think of my DD as disabled, but she is within the meaning of the federal law, and that federal law gives her rights to certain accommodations because she falls within the definition of "disabled" under that law.

    I'd be inclined to check the disabled box "yes", in the belief that it better established the right to an accommodation.
     
  13. januaryblue

    januaryblue Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2009
    Messages:
    264
    I actually have volunteered to help with the troop, so this time it won't be an issue for us, but I was wondering which box was the right box to check, especially for future forms. I'm not sure I am ready to trust her care to a newly formed troop of 1st graders and parents that have never done that or this before. :cwds:
     
  14. MamaC

    MamaC Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2006
    Messages:
    5,292
    One of the reasons I became a GS leader - before I really wanted to - was to be able to make sure the celiac was taken care of properly, and to make sure GF options were available wherever we went. It made for a little extra work and a lot more peace of mind.

    That said, I had my troops for 13 years and several of my Scouts are now out on their own, working, in grad school, and one is expecting a baby girl of her own. Most of them even stay in touch with me via Facebook.

    If you don't want to lead, be a volunteer. We love volunteers.
     
  15. Wendy12571

    Wendy12571 Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2007
    Messages:
    476
    Girl Scouts is truely leader/community dependant. One thing when I was first diagnosed was in April. Prior to my diagnosis of type 1 diabetes we were going to a camp to learn canoeing in preparing for an overnight trip to go canoeing on a river. THE FIRST thing my leader said to me when she came to see me is I have already talked to council. You are more then welcome to attend this trip if you want. I currently volunteer with two older girl scout troops and love being a leader. I was my nieces's girl scout leaders for many years. I personally would check no.
    wendy
     
  16. denise3099

    denise3099 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 31, 2009
    Messages:
    1,757
    I hate that word "disabled." I think we all do. And yet. . .well, your daughter IS disabled. So is mine. Their bodies can't produce insulin. That's a heck of a diability since you need insulin to live! But it's not the same thing as "un-able." And that's what I hold on to. DD isn't un-able. She has a disability and requires accomadations so that she IS able. Is she does what she needs to, what she HAS to that other kids who make their own insulin DON'T have to, then she IS able to do whatever she wants. But I can't ask for accomadations on the one hand, and say "No she's not disabled" on the other. I like to think she's like everybody else. Well, she's not. But she can be IF she has the accomadations that she NEEDS. Like unlimited access to food, water, bathroom, testing supplies, and the right to test bs wherever she is, as well as an adult who can handle D emergencies. If I don't claim these rights for her then dd will truly be, not only disabled, but un-able to participate in the programs other children get to take for granted. Just my 2 cents. :cwds:
     
  17. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    Funny, I was just going over paperwork today and so I grabbed one of our councils registration forms. Nowhere on it does it ask if the child is disabled. They have a huge section about race though.

    Health form asks for special accomodations needed and there is a section with illness and D is listed under it.

    I go over all the girls health forms and alert my co-leaders to anything they should be aware of. As I said, I'm a leader so for me, I don't have to worry about my daughter (whole reason for me getting involved).
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice