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Did you tell neighbors after diagnosis?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by MMMMMMM, May 28, 2017.

  1. MMMMMMM

    MMMMMMM Approved members

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    So far I've only talked to 2 neighbors about our son having diabetes. Both families have boys that ours plays with.
    We told them about the dx, what to watch for as far as low symptoms and that he should not be offered snacks.

    We don't really talk to other neighbors but we do see them outside a lot. Does it make sense to let them know?

    I don't want turn turn neighbors into "babysitters" and expect them to watch him while he's playing outside but at the same time I kind of want them to know just in case.

    With summer coming I know that all the kids will be out running around more. We hope to get a cgm but it will be a while until we can.
     
  2. susanlindstrom16

    susanlindstrom16 Approved members

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    I guess if there are people that you see are out often around where the kids are playing, it would make sense to tell them. For me personally, I don't think I would go out of my way to tell people that I don't usually talk to. How old is your son?
     
  3. MMMMMMM

    MMMMMMM Approved members

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    He is 7 and this is his 1st summer managing diabetes. We're still struggling with unexpected lows down to 40's and even though I send him out with a snack before playing and "carb" him every hour I am nervous. But I don't want to helicopter. I'm not asking for them to actually watch him for me as I will be checking in frequestly but I also want them to know just in case something did happen while they're playing. I can't wait for a cgm but must because of insurance.
    You're right that the neighbors who we don't know and are never out really outside don't need this info. I was thinking like you said of the ones who are but primarily the parents of his neighborhood friends. It does make for a slightly awkward conversation (for me). I think I would want to know if a child who was playing with my kid all the time had a serious medical condition but maybe that's just me.
     
  4. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

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    I am not sure them knowing he has Type 1 would change their behavior that much. If they are watching a bunch of kids playing outside and one of them falls down and doesn't get up they are probably going to respond the same way whether it is a bad low or a broken collar bone. They are going to rush over and see what is wrong and call for the parents or in serious cases an ambulance. That said, you should do what makes you feel comfortable in this situation and if that is telling the neighbors then you should tell them. Just my 2 cents.
     
  5. WakingLife

    WakingLife New Member

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    We told the neighborhood parents of the kids our daughter plays with a lot. 2 reasons why. If she would happen to get low to the point where she would pass out or if she says she feels bad...they should be aware that she has a medical condition which has a specific treatment. Also, if she is out playing with other kids and someone brings out ice pops or something...they should be aware she needs insulin if she is eating.
     
  6. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

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    I would error on the side of telling them so they better know how to take action if something were to occur. My daughter witnessed a seizure recently, and she said it was awful to watch. She felt really bad for the friend who hadn't known about diabetes. I think the odds of rejection if something were to happen could be much higher out of fear and trauma after such an event than if they were prepared with knowledge and what action to take in advance.
     

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