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Did anyone's CWD have coxsackie (hand, foot, and mouth disease) right before dx?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by missmakaliasmomma, Oct 21, 2013.

  1. kirsteng

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    My child was also the healthiest kid. No antibiotics or medications (even tylenol) ever in his life prior to d/x, a couple of very weak colds, and one flu? which made him throw up once... but that was a couple of weeks before d/x. Not sure if that one was the trigger or not, because he'd had the drinking and peeing syndrome for about 4 weeks before that.

    I also wonder whether my son had t1 coming down the pike for many months prior to d/x... maybe years (he was d/x'ed at 3 1/2). I remember the strange smell that came out of his room when he was sleeping at night.. I used to think that smell was his 'personal smell' and thought it was kind of spicy like a curry. ;) But he had that ketone smell for more than a year before d/x... maybe longer. Of course as soon as he started getting insulin.. no more spicy smell. ;)
     
  2. MissMadisonsMom

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    Yes, Madison had Coxsackie virus at about age 3 and was dx'd at 11 - She also has geographic tongue, ambliopa, bad cramps etc... perhaps there is a correlation, but what about the tens of thousands of kids who get the virus or other viruses and never get Diabetes?
     
  3. Beach bum

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    Obviously "evidence" is the big word here, but it's interesting.

    This was posted today on ScoopIt from Science Daily:

    http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131022091721.htm

    New Evidence for Role of Specific Virus Causing Type 1 Diabetes
    Oct. 22, 2013 ? Type 1 diabetes is a disease caused by the destruction of the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. It is often diagnosed in childhood and requires life-long treatment with daily insulin injections. It is associated with an increased risk for long-term complications which decrease the quality of life and average life-expectancy.
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    Currently around 15 million people in the world are affected by this disease, and the number of new cases is rapidly increasing. This rapid increase over the last decades indicates that environmental factors must play an important role in the disease process. Viral infections have been among one of the suspected factors, since many viruses cause diabetes in animals by damaging the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Some of them have also been linked to human type 1 diabetes raising the possibility of developing vaccines against these viruses to prevent some of the new cases of type 1 diabetes.
    Recently, considerable progress has been made in studies evaluating the possible role of one virus group, called enteroviruses, which have been connected with human type 1 diabetes in a variety of reports. These viruses are common in children, and more than 100 different enterovirus types have been identified in man. A subset of these enteroviruses can cause serious illnesses such as; myocarditis, meningitis, the hand-food- and -mouth disease as well as paralytic disease such as polio. Although the association between type 1 diabetes and enteroviruses has been observed in various studies, until now it was not known which enterovirus types are most responsible for this effect.
    Now, for the first time, a group of collaborating investigators have published results from two studies in the leading scientific diabetes journal Diabetes identifying the enterovirus types which are associated with type 1 diabetes. One study is based on children taking part in the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) study, which is a birth cohort study observing children at genetic risk for type 1 diabetes from birth up to clinical diabetes or 15 years of age.
    The other study (VirDiab) included children with newly diagnosed diabetes from five European countries. The results from these studies clearly show that members of the group B coxsackieviruses are associated with the risk of type 1 diabetes while the 35 other enterovirus types tested did not show such a connection. These findings are in line with other recent reports suggesting that group B coxsackieviruses can spread to the pancreas and damage the insulin-producing cells.
    This new discovery, funded by multiple groups, opens up novel possibilities for future research aimed at developing vaccines against these viruses to prevent type 1 diabetes. Since the group B coxsackieviruses includes only six enterovirus types it may be possible to include all of them in the same vaccine. Effective vaccines have been available for a long time against another enterovirus group, called polioviruses, which includes three enterovirus types.
    There is a clear need for a diabetes vaccine since no preventive treatments are currently available for type 1 diabetes. Based on the recent findings, it is estimated that such a vaccine could have the potential for preventing a significant proportion of new cases with type 1 diabetes. More research is needed however to confirm the causal relationship between group B coxsackieviruses and type 1 diabetes and to find out the underlying mechanisms of how these viruses can initiate the type 1 diabetes disease process.
     
  4. missmakaliasmomma

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    Probably no genetic predisposition for autoimmune diseases for those other kids who get viruses but no t1. luck of the draw. Doctors know there's a strong correlation between coxsackie and type 1, ...for type 1s who've had coxsackie before dx, they just haven't completely figured out why.
     
  5. Christopher

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    Again, I think it is inaccurate to try and make causal connections when there may not be any. There are so many other variables that could be causes. It is like saying that 60% of kids who develop diabetes had gone to the beach in the month before they were dx, so something at the beach must be causing diabetes.
     
  6. Amy C.

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    The pattern that has been noticed is the type 1 diabetic's body sometimes experiences some sort of stress -- Coxsackie is one of the disease that can cause the stress that triggers Type 1 diabetes.

    It is well know that most Type 1s do not have a family history -- some do, but a large majority do not.
     
  7. missmakaliasmomma

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    Multiple drs have told me about the connection so I believe there is one. I'm aware there are other variables obviously like genetic predisposition. Obviously that's why not all children that get coxsackie get diabetes.
     
  8. Danielle2008

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    If anything, I don't even think viruses/illness 'triggers' the autoimmune attack. I have a feeling it only exasperates the process that had already started. I read somewhere that most people, when symptoms start to show, only have 30% or so of Beta cells left. The body, for whatever time period previously, tries to compensate for the failing Beta cells...and most won't show symptoms, until so many Beta cells are gone, and the body can no longer match production needs. So, it'd make sense to me that when someone gets sick, the weakened body is unable to either, slow the autoimmune response on the beta cells, so more die 'quicker'....or are simply unable to keep up with insulin needs; which further leads to the destruction. Especially, since we know how insulin resistent one becomes when ill. That may be why it seems the actual diabetes symptoms, and diagnoses falls so quickly after an illness.

    But alas, there are always 'links' to be had...breastfed children, non breastfed, vaccines, the flu etc. etc. As I look at it, they know very, very little about the cause. Just like there are always new reports, and then the same report revoked a year later when another study says something different....Knowing the cause may help prevent someone else from getting Diabetes, but it certainly won't help if you already have it. So I don't find interest in those kind of articles.
     
  9. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I agree with ^

    And I'd go further. Even if one KNEW that a particular kid was going to develop Type 1 from coming into contact with x,y,z virus what would one do? Put them in a bubble??
     
  10. Christopher

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    If it makes you feel better to believe that then I guess that is nice for you.
     
  11. missmakaliasmomma

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    Guess so =)
     
  12. missmakaliasmomma

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    That's a good view on it also.
     
  13. missmakaliasmomma

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    Right, it just can't be done lol. I'm not going to keep my son away from everything just because I'm afraid he'll get it. If he's gonna get it, he's gonna get it sooner or later.
     
  14. Helenmomofsporty13yearold

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    DD had the coxsackie virus in junior kindergarten and was diagnosed with Type 1 in Grade 2. Her grandmother's mother was Type 1. I believe the virus can trigger it, if you are predisposed to it.
     
  15. swellman

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    "Connection" or correlation does not imply causation and even doctors are susceptible to this logical fallacy.
     

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