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Diagnosed One Week Ago now have 250 - 300 BS Readings

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by MAsDad, Feb 10, 2010.

  1. MAsDad

    MAsDad Approved members

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    Hi all, wondering if this sounds right to anyone here. My 13 year old daughter was diagnosed last Wednesday with Type 1. She was taken to the ER and admitted to the pediatric ICU with blood sugar level of 585. We were discharged on Friday, have been seen by a pediatric endocrinologist, and have a follow-up appointment this Friday.

    She's on 8 units of Novolog for meals, and 20 units Lantus at bedtime. She's feeling ok she says, but her readings for the last day or two have been in the mid-to-high 200's with an occasional 300. Dr told me this morning after I sent him an email about it that she can increase her mealtime Novolog to 10 units and we'll see how she is on Friday.

    Her meals are under 60 grams carbs each. This morning she was 276, and then had 8 units novolog, then ate 2 eggs scrambled and instant cream of wheat cereal. Also had a half of a banana and fat free skim milk. That was at 630am. She texted me from school later saying she tested 305 at noon and took 10 units (increase of 2 units) of Novolog and was about to have a big salad. She feels relatively normal, but these high readings freak us both out.

    I'll see what the next BS meter reading is after the 10 units taken at lunch and let you know.

    Anyone?????
     
  2. Lance

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    These are obviously not the kind of numbers you want to see, but you are just getting started at this journey, and high numbers happen to everybody. Your endo will help tweak this, and once you get more comfortable, you will probably learn to make adjustments on your own. I'm sure she will be much happier once you can count carbs and give insulin based on what she eats, rather than trying to match carb counts to a fixed insulin dosage.

    This is a marathon, not a sprint. Take each of these numbers and learn from them. You (and she) will learn how to react to out of range numbers as you go forward.
     
  3. Our3girls

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    We have found that the numbers can change for no reason. My daughter was diagnosed in December and after a couple of weeks I asked our endo when we should start seeing more consistent numbers she laughed (not meanly) and said well never. It is always a game of up and down because different food, activity, hormones, stress... will make them flectuate. I am not familiar with the insulin she is taking we have NPH and Novolog so when she goes into the high 200's we give a small amount of the fast acting to bring her down and then see how the day continues but that normally corrects that high and then we are good with normal dose. I know not real encouraging but you learn quickly to roll with the "BG's" :) I wish you the best and this forum has been great to answer so many questions!!
     
  4. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Yes, you are right to be asking questions because given that amount of insulin I'd be expecting lower numbers.

    There are a few possibilities ... is she doing her own shots? In other words, and please don't take this the wrong way, are you sure she's actually getting this amount of insulin? Are you sure that the insulin is good?

    Has the Dr spoken with you about the "honeymoon" phase? Your DD's meal bolus amounts seem very high to me - and I'd just be aware that those amounts may ( rather suddenly) become too much.

    This is such a difficult time :cwds: So much to learn and so little time. I think you are right to be in close contact with the endo and just keep very, very careful logs so that you can really begin to understand how her body is using the insulin. I also really like Ragnar Hanas' book as a basic intro to D and insulin http://www.amazon.com/Type-Diabetes...=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265824441&sr=1-1
     
  5. Becky Stevens mom

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    Hello and welcome, lets see now, so she is doing the same amount of novolog regardless of amount of carbs in the food eaten, is that correct? She is probably still very insulin resistant which will take some time to get through with that. My concern is that if she takes 10 units of a fast acting insulin and then chooses to not have food with carbs she will go low. Were you told to have her eat a certain amount of carbs at each meal?

    For many of us here we count carbs now and have a insulin to carb ratio that we follow. An example would be, my son just had lunch, He had approx 60 carbs, his blood sugar was 81 so using a 1:15 ratio he was given 4 units of fast acting insulin to cover those carbs. If he had been over 175 I would have given him an extra unit as a correction.

    At the endo visit Friday ask the endo about counting carbs as that makes things easier in the long run. For now it sounds like they are trying to figure out the proper basal amount for your daughter. The best of luck to you all :cwds:
     
  6. MAsDad

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    Fact is, it's all so very new to us that we don't have the knowledge to do anything other than follow Drs orders. That's the way it should be to start out.

    We talked about the Honeymoon phase and the need for consistent insulin in her system. Dr asked us to start with 8 units at meals and 10 units of Lantus at bedtime. First couple of days we saw some 90's, a 78 blood sugar reading even. Then on Monday and yesterday just seemed to stay high. Could be stress, insulin resistence (whatever that means), whatever.

    I trust the doctor, he's well respected and his patients' parents' that I have talked with love his style of doctoring and care. His initiatl, and current method with us to establish a routine of even doses at meals and bedtime, then once her levels become more normal, go to a finer carb-counting-insulin-dosage method so we're not chasing a blood sugar number with carbs.

    I'm going to post this in the parents with children fora as well.

    We'll see what this afternoon brings.
     
  7. MAsDad

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    232 at 3:30pm, and she looks and feels terrific. Even kidding around about all the diabetic supplies and stuff in Target while we waited (again) for the pharmacist to ring us up some more of that fun stuff.:cwds:
     
  8. allisa

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    I agree...at the beginning doctors will start slow & with good reason....you don't want to jump too fast, give too much insulin and then have the body kick out some since it's still honeymooning then have a real bad low.

    Sounds like you have confidence in the doctor....I'd keep reading, keep learning, and go slow...no need to sprint against Diabetes at this point ( 1 week in)....you've got a LONG time to race against it.....
     
  9. Kimby

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    We started out much the way! I remember talking to the school nurse fresh from the hospital & having no clue when asked about carb ratios. She had to call our endo & they explained that he would get them soon, but that we were still learning. Andrew was still having highs which scared me, but they wanted to bring him down slowly. After he started his honeymoon, I was thankful. There's so much to learn, but you will get there! It will be much easier to make adjustments in time when other things have been figured out!
     

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