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diabetic tasered by police

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by ToddsMom, Dec 14, 2008.

  1. ToddsMom

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    I just saw on my comcast homepage, a video from fox news showing a man in diabetic shock being pulled over for drunk driving. The police tasered him before thay realized he was diabetic. I find this so upsetting. That POOR MAN!! I am really bad with links, but I will try. Maybe someone else has seen this video and can provide one.
     
  2. flabby_abi

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  3. mikesmom58

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    Thanks for the info. Can't really blame the cops for doing their job but it is unfortunate that things like this happen alot. What's next, tattoos on the forehead? I'm all for those stickers on the windshield alerting to a diabetic driver.
     
  4. sammysmom

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    The man was combative and in need of assistance. There was not way to tell if he was diabetic or just drunk and fighting. If his bg was 11 then that did not happed all at once. This man was obvioulsy driving while bg was dropping. Did he check his bg before he got behind the wheel..probably not. Did he pull over and check himself while driving becuase he felt himself going low....probable not. I am glad that he was stopped. Thank GOD he did not kill another family or himself by driving with a low bg. If he was hypo unaware than he needs to take responsibility for that and make sure he consistantly pulls over and check bg when driving.

    Sorry I really do not feel that the police did anything wrong. If he was drunk and fighting the police he would have been tasered. There was absolutely no way for the police to know he was diabetic. After he was tasered the ambulance was called and the man was taken care of. I am sorry it happened but I can not fault the police. I am glad they pulled the man over. I am glad that my family was driving no where near this man when this incident happened.
     
  5. ToddsMom

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    Oh, I wasn't saying the police did anything wrong. How were they supposed to know?

    When I said it was upsetting, it just was. Not because I blamed anyone. Just stunk all the way around. I too am glad that no one else was hurt, and that he was pulled over before anything worse happened.:eek:

    Whoever said something about a sticker on the windsheild may not have a bad idea.
     
  6. sammysmom

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    Oh I know you were not saying that. I was just giving my opinion, thats all:D
    My hubby is a police officer and a father of a type 1 diabetic. So I kind of feel strongly about that. Sorry, did not mean to offend.
     
  7. ToddsMom

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    I wasn't offended Shannon, I am glad you gave your opinion.:) That's why I started the thread, for discussion purposes. I should have been more clear on my position to begin with, then I wouldn't have had to clarify. It would be interesting to know your father's opinion of the incident.

    My husband has gotten in 3 accidents in the past, due to LO's. They are nervewracking and it was such a relief that no one else was involved. Hubby was very irresponsible, and was not checking his BG at that time. It would anger me that he would be so reckless with his own life, as well as putting others in danger. Not to mention, it is hard enough for people with Type 1 to deal with barriers and discrimination and the last thing needed, is his example of driving with Type 1. Thankfully, he has had a major attitude improvement and is taking much better care of himself. I shudder to think of what *could* have happened.
     
  8. sammysmom

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    My husband (not father) is the police officer. This is a tough spot with him knowing what he knows about diabetes and still having to protect himself and others while on duty. He knows what to look for (because of our son) but saying that he still must defend himself and others. There was no way of knowing if the dibetic had a gun or other weapon on him. There really was no other way to keep the police officer safe and help the man, if he was being very combative than to taser him. My husband has helped many diabetics with low bg's and that is usually the first thing he asks if the person is coherent and non combative. Like I said, it is a fine line a police officer walks when it comes to a combative suspect.
     
  9. David

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    How much do cops get paid in the US? In the UK they're on a pretty good whack, and certainly enough to demand that they make an assessment of diabetes, emotional trauma and any other similar impacting situations. They should know A LOT better IMO.

    With great respect, your husband has personal experience. Police officers should be trained to behave as your husband would regardless of personal experience.
     
    Last edited: Dec 14, 2008
  10. sammysmom

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    Police officers at times must use tasers. This man was combative and argumentative. He would not follow instructions so that the police could assess if he had any medical problems. The police were not able (from what I read) to pat him down to check for weapons. So what you had was a combative person, arguing with police and the police having no clue if the man was armed. What if he was...armed and low, not a good combination if you ask me. What else could they have done to protect themselves? Like I said, if a person is coherent and able to express that they have a medical condition than the police should be held accountable for getting medical help. This was not the situation. They did what any other officer would have done with a combative suspect.
     
  11. ToddsMom

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    I guess it would be important to know if, like your husband (not father, sorry) would, *they* asked him if he had diabetes.
     
  12. sammysmom

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    Well after a suspect is properly restrained then the questions could be asked. I do not think that asking specifically if the person has diabetes really happens. What most law enforcement ask is "do you have any medical conditions" which then encompasses everything from diabetes to seizures. But first off for the safety of the officer, general public and the suspect himself, he must be restrained and especially if they are combative.
     
  13. ToddsMom

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    Being a police officer is a dangerous job,and they have to consider their own safety no question! But there has to be SOME way to protect innocent people from being tasered, even if they are being combative. It would be interesting to hear some more ideas on how the situation could be improved for all involved, in similar situations in the future.
     
  14. Omo2three

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    That is a very scary situation, makes you realize how important it is to have a medical bracelet and it being visible. I agree he might not of checked before and would be a good candidate for CGMS.

    I feel bad for both sides, I bet those officers felt horrible after knowing it was a medical condition. The cops deal with so many life threatening situations, they have to be safe first. I am not sure how I feel about the diabetic sticker on the window, that could be missed too. If it was somehow linked with the license plate numbers...cops usually pull that up first before confronting the driver. Maybe a red flag noting D.
     

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