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Diabetic monkey trained for daily insulin injections

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by C6H12O6, Feb 14, 2009.

  1. C6H12O6

    C6H12O6 Approved members

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  2. StillMamamia

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    Awwww....:cwds:
     
  3. Barbzzz

    Barbzzz Approved members

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    Gee, I sure hope he (Diabetic Monkey) knows to rotate the injection sites. :D:eek::rolleyes: Left cheek, right cheek, left cheek, right cheek... :p
     
  4. TonyCap

    TonyCap Approved members

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    Wow, that's amazing. :)
     
  5. frizzyrazzy

    frizzyrazzy Approved members

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    Perhaps someone should share this info with the CA nurses association .

    :D
     
  6. StillMamamia

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    roflmao:d:d:d
     
  7. seeingspots

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    This is actually not so unique... I worked for almost 10 years at the San Diego Zoo and we had both a drill (named "Loon") and a Golden Bellied Mangabey (named "Boobet") which were both diabetic and trained to accept insulin injections.

    I was actually the one who was in charge of training Boobet from the start, and it didn't take long... she was one smart little monkey! :) She would willingly present her fingers/toes for blood glucose testing, her shoulders for insulin injections (she'd let us use a little hair clippers to shave the area and make it easier for the shots), and would pee on to a tray for us to check her urine ketones. She got to go out on exhibit with two other Mangabeys, but would willingly come in for blood checks every two hours, and to also get a snack. (All of her food we prepared was weighed/measured, and the zoo's nutritionist had to approve any changes.) She'd willingly do most of her "training" (diabetes management) for nothing more than a half a grape.

    When I left the zoo to become a SAHM, I never dreamed that just a few years later I'd be managing the diabetes of my own little "primate"... my 1 year old son.:rolleyes:
     

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