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diabetes and Child Protective Services

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by YJC, Aug 16, 2012.

  1. MomofSweetOne

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    I am so glad to hear things are going better for you and your daughter. You were learning at such a fast rate.

    I've been looking for studies this week on how the team approach from the HOSPITAL'S side affects families with stress, learning, success. I haven't found a single study, and yet they've analyzed family systems extensively. I know our dealing with hospital staff, policies, etc. directly relate to the stress our family is under at times, either positively in supporting us or negatively creating stress when there hadn't been.
     
  2. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    One of my aunts used to be a social worker who placed kids in foster homes (now she works for the VA) and I asked her what happened to diabetic kids.
    She told me that all of the diabetic kids she'd placed were adolescents who took care of themselves and that nothing extra was needed.

    So I want to say, as someone who was diagnosed at age 17, that taking care of your own diabetes as a teenager is an immensely difficult task, and that placing such youth with people who can actually help (vs criticise or "remind") would be a boon.

    Please understand that dealing well with diabetes as a teenager can be overwhelming or even impossible, even without the stresses faced by kids in the foster care system.

    Also, risking hypoglycemia is essential for good blood sugar control. A lot of fearful people with diabetes run constant high blood sugars because they don't think they will be safe if they go low. I imagine that if I was yanked out of my home and placed in a house with people who didn't know much about diabetes, I would be very very worried about whether I'd be able to get enough sugar to treat a low if I had a serious one, and I'd run higher and more dangerous blood sugars as a consequence.
     
  3. Mrs. Russman

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    I wanted to comment on the amount of supplies in the house.
    medicaid and Schip will only pay for one month supply at a time. If it is near the end of the month a family may be almost out of supplies.
    Some months if someone investigated us near the end of our 30 days we would have less than a bottle of insulin (he uses 4 a month) and few or no extra infusion sites and only a couple of syringes and be on our last vial of test strips. Most families on chip or medicaid don't have extra money to buy a $100 vial of insulin if one gets lost or broken. And if only the minimum test strips are prescribed then its easy to run out with retesting and mistakes ( I wasted 3 in the middle of the night two nights ago).
    And dealing with CHIP and Medicaid can be very frustrating and time consuming. I've spent entire mornings making phone calls between various offices. and made unnecessary trips to his pcp for 'referrals', all are draining on resources.
    I think getting a neutral 3rd party pediatric endo's opinion is suspected cases of neglect is a good idea.
    Access to After-school and preschool programs that will provide appropriate care for children with type 1 diabetes would go a long way in supporting these families.
     
  4. sooz

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    Good point about the supplies. In fact I think everyone has contributed a lot. It would be great if we had some indication the OP was reading what we write. It is kind of disheartening to take the time to post only for it to be ignored. I hope she will come back and see it even if she doesn't let us know she has read it.
     
  5. Christopher

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    I wouldn't let it bother me. It happens sometimes. You did your part to be helpful and that is the best you can do.
     
  6. NomadIvy

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    OT

    OMG, off topic...,but that is an absolute nightmare :eek:
     
  7. April SD

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    I am glad to see this post as I have been wondering if CPS can or does step in when there is neglect by a parent of a child with Type 1 diabetes. I would say that neglect/abuse would be things like poor diet, diet is SO important and parents who do not provide the right nutritional plan on a daily basis as instructed by the Doctor and Dietician has a huge effect. Also another thing would be the administrating of the insulin, how it is given, what the mood is i.e. is the parent loving or frustrated and angry with the child for fussing. NO kid would like having injections and becoming angry with the child at injection time is abuse and would have long-term effects psychologically. The state of the living environment, how clean and hygeinic is the home, is the child at risk of infections and illness do to this. Parental supervison is a big one, is the child being babysat by an untrained sitter, or having to self-manage the diabetes alone when the parent is not around. As a parent of a child with Type 1 diabetes I understand fully the time and energy it takes, the patience, the meal planning, the waking up in the night to test, etc.. it is a hard transition for both parent and child when a child is diagnosed with this disease, and especially in cases where their are two homes the child goes between (divorced parents). Is the non-custodial parent who cares for the child only on weekends taking care of things properly. I would say if there are any complaints from a child with this chronic illness, for CPS to seriously look at all factors, check out the living environments, talk to the doctors. You can not go on blood sugar readings.
     
  8. Lee

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    OLD THREAD!!!

    Who are you and why would you open a thread over a year and a half old? Also, what is your relation to Diabetes...
     
  9. Christopher

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    Just so I am clear, you think CPS should be called in if the parents are not giving their child a balanced diet, get frustrated around injections, or don't keep their house clean?
     
  10. mmgirls

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    I guess I should be waiting for CPS then.

    When it comes to CPS every case has to be looked at as an individual basis, family dynamics are so different even within close families.
     
  11. Christopher

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    You may be waiting awhile. They are going to be at my house for a long time. :eek:
     
  12. shannong

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    Agreed. Only a trained medical professional could give an evaluation as to the state of a child's health and their diabetes management. It would be very dangerous to think that a social worker could ever make this assessment. Social workers ARE trained to recognize signs of neglect - under weight, no food in the house, lack of supervision, etc. Usually a doctor is consulted in cases of neglect where it is suspected that the child's health may be in danger, which is typical protocol. If a child has a known medical condition, all the more reason to consult the experts.
     
  13. Jaredsmom

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    Our sons school has decided to call CPS on us and we are having a meeting with them on Weds to discuss the allegations against us. I contacted our endo right away who was shocked. Our son is 13 1/2 and his last a1c was 8.0 he is smack down ins the middle of puberty. CPS has basically already told us they. Feel the allegations against us are baseless but they are obligated by law to follow up. The school has alleged that he runs out of supplies at school but when asked for specific instances they couldnt name any they only said somtimes he runs low. Which is actually their fault they will not tell me he is running low on something untill he is out, he was actually using glucose tabs out of his emergency bus bag because they wouldn't allow him to refill his glucose table in his regular bag from the school supplies because they were running low but yet I never got a phone call also at the beginging of the year they were correcting his bg less than 2 hrs after his breakfast bolus was given then turned around and gave another correction 1 hr later I was pissed and I got the endo involved. This was directly against our endos orders. They also have been refusing to give him snacks and only giving him glucose tabs when he is low instead of following his care plan which calls for a snack. But yet we are the ones that are being accused of not properly caring for him. Jared has been diabetic for 8+ years and has only been hospitalized one time for DKA and that was due to a pod failure overnight. Apparently the principal at our sons schools feels that our sons snacks for lows aren't healthy and we think that is the real reason he was only being given glucose tabs. For low snacks we send 100 cal nutter butters , rice crispy treats, granola bars, ind bags of cheese it's , etc. Jared also has a learning disability and therefore require a little bit more one on one than other kids he struggles with math and reading is below grade level. We are discussing hiring a lawyer because his neither his health or educational needs are being meet. I have 18 emails that detail the mistakes they have made so I have proof .
     
  14. ecs1516

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    So sorry this is happening to you. Just so you know many of the snacks you have mentioned were used at summer diabetes camps I have seen.
    The school must think type 1 means no sugar like they did in the 'old days'. Sounds like the school needs some education from your endo team.
     
  15. Jaredsmom

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    My sons principal told him Jared there are just certain things you can't eat or do. I wasn't real happy when I heard about that crap but I told him his principal was wrong and let it go now I am beating my self up for not saying something to him directly. Apparently the principal has also been looking at jared's meter to see how many times we test him and what his reading are. Yes I said the principal not the nurse. I am wondering if this violates HIPPA. Apparently one of the things we have been accused of is not testing enough on the weekends. Hello he has a CGMS and he has more than one meter. Also we allow him to have unhealthy foods. Another case of people misunderstanding the disease. Yes we allow him to have things with real sugar, no that's not all he eats. Btw I bet he eats healthier than most teenagers. Quite frankly sugar free crap gives him diarrhea and headaches. I am so fed up with all this schools crap but I don't know what to do he is in 8th grade so it is his last year there with less than 3 mths left I really don't want to move him to a new school. I have talked to them about how he needs to be cared for but they don't seem to get it and I am worn out from trying.
     
  16. ecs1516

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    I would think the principal should not be looking at the logs. They probably don't even know what a CGM is. If you get the Feb. issue from Gary Scheiner , he says in there that with a CGM you can test less. You might could document what he says and use that for info against this.
    Also, if your endo agrees with the amount of checking, I would think a letter from them is all you need.
     
  17. Tomdiorio

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    Wow, sometimes I have no filter on what comes out of my mouth and that principal would get an earful from me. I believe I would call the school board on him. How dare someone like that assume he/she knows anything about your child's D. Or maybe even D for that matter.

    That is disgusting and he/she should be held accountable for their actions.
     
  18. Darryl

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    The OP was 6 months ago and never returned. Another provocative post that doesn't quite line up with reality by someone with no signature and 1 total post including the OP.
     
  19. Jaredsmom

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    Oh trust me as soon as CPS has come and ruled that the claims are unsubstantiated we will be making a lot of phone calls. We don't know for sure it was him that called we were just told our sons school had some concerns. CPS also came and visited with our son while he was at school. We weren't home when they dropped by our house that day. They must have came by our house after visiting with him. We were both at work. My husband gets home from work about 1/2 hr before our son does. He called them when he saw the notice on our door. I am particularly disturbed by these accusations due to the fact that I am a private duty pediatric nurse and I work with special needs clients. I feel these accusations could be damaging to my reputation even though there is no truth to them whatsoever. It is simply a case of someone who thinks they know more than I do about how to care for my child when they have no medical or practical knowledge of type 1. My endo feels that we do a good job taking care of our son and with a a1c of 8.0 at 13 and with puberty in full swing I feel like we are doing pretty good not perfect but we try.
     
  20. swellman

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    I think I would take the opportunity to turn CPS towards the school. I would say "Let's get some actual doctors involved and have a mediated conversation. Oh, and my attorney will be there."
     

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