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Diabetes and Autism in same family

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by momandwifeoftype1s, Mar 13, 2008.

  1. momandwifeoftype1s

    momandwifeoftype1s Approved members

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    If you don't mind me asking, how many of you have a child with type-1diabetes and another child with Autism? I have a T-1 diabetic and a child on the Autism spectrum. I'm wondering if there is a common gene? I've noticed some of you have posted in your signature that you have a child with Autism who is not diabetic. Any more of you out there? I know that some know more about the biology of diabetes. Is there a scientific correlation? Thanks!

    Amy
     
  2. andeefig

    andeefig Approved members

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    we have one child so far, but our nephew (on my husbands side) has PDD-NOS under the Autisim umbrella.
     
  3. suzyq63

    suzyq63 Approved members

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    As you can see from my signature, my daughter with diabetes also has autism. Fortunately the autistic traits are pretty mild, but the developmental delays are enough that she will never be independent.
     
  4. sarahconnormom

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    My 6 yr old son has T1 Diabetes and my 11 yr old daughter is diagnosed with ADHD and PDD-NOS (an autism spectrum disorder).
    My dh is also a T1 Diabetic.
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2008
  5. Emmasmommy

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    Emma is the D little one and she is 10 months younger then my Autisum baby! I know that when my daughter was D with autisum the doctor was telling me that they are seeing more and more links between D, congenital heart, and Autism. I found it very interesting and then more resently we were asked by someone doing a study about autism and one of the questions was do you or your spouce have D or another member of the family (type one only)
     
  6. sugarmonkey

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    My daughter (non D) has autistic tendencies. Not quite on the spectrum, but definitely some of the behaviours of autism. Kind of OT but my son is reading a book about a kid with autism at the moment and every now and then he'll read something the kid does and then says 'Mum Shanaiah does that too.'
     
  7. HiThere

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    Brandon has diabetes and autism (PDD-NOS). We have no other autism or diabetes in any family members I know of.

    I searched for so long to find kids with both of these. It's so frustrating, since one of the major things about autism is a pickiness with food tastes/textures and difficulty eating food variety. Which makes diabetes harder, in my opinion. The diabetes doctors don't understand the autism (and the food problems associated), and the autism specialists don't understand the diabetes! (I'm speaking generally, of course) Which makes treatment of both that much more difficult. Brandon was non-verbal until about four or five, but has now made extreme strides and now comes across as just a shy child. We homeschool, but not particularly because of the diabetes or autism, it just works better for my children and me.
     
  8. Emmasmommy

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    I find this so interesting meeting other families with both Autisum and D. We dont have a family history of D or Autisum but we got both! It must be very hard finding things for your child to eat because I know my little one with autisum will only eat things that she wants when she wants other wise its like pulling teath and we all know what its like to try and reason with a child with Autisum it doesnt really work and we have to pick our battle's!
     
  9. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    I'm diagnosed on the spectrum and so are two of my brothers.
    I've seen two studies out there and neither one showed a strong correlation. One found an even lower rate of autism among diabetic kids, and one found a very very slightly higher. It doesn't seem like there's any relation.
     
  10. momandwifeoftype1s

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    Ok... here's another question for those of you with a Type-1 diabetic child (or if you're a diabetic/teen) and another child on the Autism spectrum. Does your diabetic child have any "soft" autistic qualities, but does not have a "label"? Really good at puzzles? Really picky eater? Fixated on one thing at a time like trains, dinosaurs, planets, etc... (restricted interests). Likes to line things up over and over? Sleeping issues? Likes to spin without getting dizzy?

    I've read some of the research out there on Autism and T-1 in the same child, but I'm not sure if there is any research being done about families with T-1 diabetes, Autism (and autoimmune disorders?). I'm wondering if at diabetes diagnosis, hospitals could give a questionnaire to ask about other family members and history of diabetes, Autism, Lupus, other autoimmune disorders. It's easier to look at the facts on one child with a diabetes diagnosis, but what about the whole picture? Whole family history? Following a family throughout childhood?

    The reason I'm so interested in this is because I have a child with T-1 diabetes, a husband with T-1 diabetes, my husband's father has type 2 diabets, my grandmother had Lupus, my younger son was diagnosed with Sensory Processing Disorder and is in special ed for a variety of delays. My older son (the one with T-1) has some "soft" similar qualities to a child with Autism. He's at the top of his class and very social, but has some of the "soft" qualities. Additionally, I just started a job as an Autism Tutor so I'm reading doing quite a bit of research to educate myself and working 1:1 with a young child with Autism. I also personally know of several families who struggle with both diabetes and Autism. Always looking for a cure...

    Thank you for you for sharing.

    Amy
     
  11. Jacob'sDad

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    Our daughter has ADHD but she also does some very strange things. We should do some research on autism. I think she has something going on beyond ADHD although her teachers and psychologist have never mentioned autism. I think I will have my wife do some research and talk to her psychologist about it. Thats kind of the deal. I deal with most of Jacobs stuff and my wife deals more with Andrea. Of course we help each other too.
     
  12. allisa

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    daughter on spectrum & son with Diabetes.....
     
  13. czardoust

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    My son Austin (age 8) was dx'ed with ODD just last Monday. Its on the lower end of the Autism spectrum. We started him on vitamins to help balance things out. His teacher noticed a difference in just 3 days, we noticed it sooner. I dont think its a gene thats related to D. I think its because he has 3-sister-itis. :D
     
  14. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    Your doctor told you ODD is part of the autistic spectrum? I never heard that before.
     
  15. Debbie

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    Adyson has diabetes and my son has some possible "soft" autistic traits. He had texture issues with food and also tended to have resticted interests when he was younger.
     
  16. momofphoenix

    momofphoenix Approved members

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    Actually you have to have 7/10 of the traits of Autism to be considered autistic....

    PDD
    ODD
    OCD
    ADD
    ADHD
    TEXTURE ISSUES
    and
    COMMUNICATION DELAYS
    are only a few of them.
    Phoenix is borderline autistic (they think) he is right on the spectrum but he does not have enough of the traits to be considered "autistic" they say
    Asperger autism is more likely... (High functioning autism)
     
  17. momtojess

    momtojess Approved members

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    My middle son (Joey) was tested. He officially has ODD, OCD, and anxiety issues, all in very mild form. Joey is my unique child, but he is the most interesting kid.

    the other 2 children seem quite "average", with no signs of anything.

    I will be interested, after we get Jessi's celiac resluts.. If we go gluten free if that will help Joey's issues at all. I have heard both good and bad results from it.
     
  18. allisa

    allisa Approved members

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    Just to clarify :

    ADHD, ADD, OCD & ODD are not forms of autism.....

    http://www.autismspeaks.org/whatisit/index.php



    Autism was first identified in 1943 by Dr. Leo Kanner of Johns Hopkins Hospital. At the same time, a German scientist, Dr. Hans Asperger, described a milder form of the disorder that is now known as Asperger Syndrome (read more). These two disorders are listed in the DSM IV (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) as two of the five developmental disorders that fall under the autism spectrum disorders. The others are Rett Syndrome, PDD NOS (Pervasive Developmental Disorder), and Childhood Disintegrative Disorder. All of these disorders are characterized by varying degrees of impairment in communication skills and social abilities, and also by repetitive behaviors. For more discussion on the range of diagnoses that comprise autism spectrum disorder, click here.

    Autism spectrum disorders can usually be reliably diagnosed by age 3, although new research is pushing back the age of diagnosis to as early as 6 months. Parents are usually the first to notice unusual behaviors in their child or their child's failure to reach appropriate developmental milestones. Some parents describe a child that seemed different from birth, while others describe a child who was developing normally and then lost skills. Pediatricians may initially dismiss signs of autism, thinking a child will “catch up,” and may advise parents to “wait and see.” New research shows that when parents suspect something is wrong with their child, they are usually correct. If you have concerns about your child's development, don't wait: speak to your pediatrician about getting your child screened for autism.

    If your child is diagnosed with autism, early intervention is critical to gain maximum benefit from existing therapies. Although parents may have concerns about labeling a toddler as “autistic,” the earlier the diagnosis is made, the earlier interventions can begin. Currently, there are no effective means to prevent autism, no fully effective treatments, and no cure. Research indicates, however, that early intervention in an appropriate educational setting for at least two years during the preschool years can result in significant improvements for many young children with autism spectrum disorders. As soon as autism is diagnosed, early intervention instruction should begin. Effective programs focus on developing communication, social, and cognitive skills.
    Autism Speaks Canada Autism Speaks UK Privacy Terms of Service Contact Us

    © 2008 Autism Speaks Inc.
    Autism Speaks and Autism Speaks It's Time To Listen & Design
    are trademarks owned by Autism Speaks Inc. All rights reserved.
     
  19. cdarby6

    cdarby6 New Member

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    hi

    My 4 year old has both type 1 diabetes and autism and my 2 year old has pdd-nos. I find it very odd that these to disorders are together. Doctors never look at the underlying issues.
     

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