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Dexcom Questions

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by dshull, Sep 17, 2013.

  1. dshull

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    Why oh why did we not get this earlier?? I don't know. I have learned so much in the last 4 days alone. Yesterday my son got a correction before getting on the bus (not something I like to do, but he was over 300). Came home to the sitter, checked and was 129. Fifteen minutes later, they were playing outside and he was hanging upside down in a tree when dex alarmed low - finger stick and he was 60. He is good at feeling his lows if he is standing on his feet, but not so great hanging upside down in a tree :D

    I have a few questions I was hoping more experienced users could help me with -

    - When we download the data into a report, it shows him as high almost all the time, because it considers anything over 130 to be high. For my 8 year old, his range is 80-180. How can I change that range so I can look at the numbers more accurately?

    - How do your young kids carry dex around? We just started on the pump, and the spibelt has worked well for that. Dex fits in there, too, but he says it is too bulky and he does not like the way it sticks out of his shirt. I suggested a lanyard but he said he does not want to wear one everyday. I am loving having the dex, so I am trying to come up with a way to make it easy so he doesn't resist carrying it. We have a double spibelt, but dex is too long to fit in there. He could put it in his pocket, but I have a feeling it would get lost.

    Thanks!
     
  2. hawkeyegirl

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    We bought a soft case for the Dex from Tallygear. The case has a loop on the back so that you can slide it on to the Spibelt right next to his pump. It's what we do when he is at school. When he's at home, it just lays around the living room somewhere. :)

    We never download, so I can't help you with the reports, but I suspect that it will show his range as your high and low thresholds.
     
  3. Beach bum

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    When we download the data into a report, it shows him as high almost all the time, because it considers anything over 130 to be high. For my 8 year old, his range is 80-180. How can I change that range so I can look at the numbers more accurately?

    You can go in and change the High alert. Ours is set for a high as 240 (for school so it's not constantly distracting her) and a low of 90 (so we can stop a low in it's tracks). Some people choose to completely turn the high alert off.

    - How do your young kids carry dex around? We just started on the pump, and the spibelt has worked well for that.

    She has a case from Tallygear that she either hooks onto her pants or her kit. Sometimes she uses her double Spi-belt and puts it in there. At home it just stays with her meter (or I charge it) or if she's outside playing I will usually put it in the window.
     
  4. Mish

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    The dex fits in the double spibelt. No problem. That's what my son uses when he doesn't have pants with pockets or a belt. He likes that he can actually read the dexcom through the spibelt fabric without removing it. The fabric is thin enough to do this.

    90% of the time, though, he clips it on his pants at school because he's got a belt on already. It's sort of old man looking, but he seems oblivious to this fact. ;)
     
  5. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I'm pretty sure that when you're in the download data if you go to the upper right left hand corner of the screen there's something there that lets you adjust and personalize the range. Just keep poking around, you'll find it.

    We also use the tally-gear soft case and she does have it on a lanyard, a shortish one. She occasionally puts it around her neck but it's most often in her pocket, her backpack, her sports bag or hanging off a door knob or the back of a chair. The lanyard makes it easy to find in a bag, and somehow easier to grab and go. The case also offers some protection from getting tossed around. ;)
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2013
  6. StacyMM

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    My son, when he's out, carries his in a Tallygear belt with his PDM and testing supplies. At home, it just sits on the computer desk in the living room. DD carries hers in the back pocket of her shorts. If she's wearing something with a back pocket, she clips a bag onto a belt look or wears a Tallygear belt.
     
  7. DavidN

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    We use tally-gear as well. It is attached to the short lanyard which he secures to a belt loop then puts in his pocket. If it comes out of his pocket the lanyard catches it. At night we hang it on his door knob and it dangles over a baby monitor.
     
  8. cm4kelly

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    You need cargo pants!

    My son does wear a tummitote type belt with his pump in one pocket and the Dex receiver in the other
    However, sometimes he just wants a break from that!

    The best thing I have found is cargo pants/shorts. These usually have quite a few pockets - and often the ones closer to the bottom have velcro closures.

    I will let him put his receiver in one of the VELCRO closure pockets - that makes me feel safe about him not losing it. He cannot just put it in a regular pocket. I'm too afraid it will fall out.

    This has worked for us - and especially for boys, the cargo pants are popular.
     
  9. nanhsot

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    Double spibelt here too, fits perfectly. Most of the time he does have it in his pocket though.
     
  10. hdm42

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    My son puts his pump in his spibelt, and has the Dex in its case clipped on to either the spibelt band or onto his pants' waistband or pocket.

    Yes, you can change the range in the reports. It's up at the top of the page somewhere.
     
  11. Lizzie's Mom

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    Go to your Dexcom display on your computer and look at the top for the 'Options' tab and click on it. Look for 'Glucose Range Filters'. You can make changes there which will reflect on the charts. Expand all the options and become familiar with them; I didn't make many changes, but it was nice to see what options there were for me to tailor it to our needs.

    About wearing Dex: While in the house, I keep Dex with me; I pay attention to it; dd does not always :rolleyes:. When she goes outside (bike riding, etc.), she wears it, mostly with the case that came with Dex, though we also have the tally-gear case, which gives her several wearing options.
     
  12. dshull

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    Thanks for the suggestions - I will look into the different cases.

    So now a new question comes up - what to do about the distraction that Dex causes in school? I got a call from the nurse today that both my son's classroom teacher and music teacher came to her to say that my son pulls Dex out to look at it all day long and that this is causing a major distraction in school. I changed the high alarm to 300 so hopefully it won't buzz all day long - but apparently he pulls it out of the spi belt a lot throughout the day to look at it, whether it's alarming or not. I think this is a combination of it being a neat and cool thing to look at that no other kids have, but also I think he is genuinely curious about what the number is.

    I want him safe and I want the data. But I also want him to learn at school and not be either thinking about blood sugar all day or using dex as a tool to entertain him during the less interesting parts of school.

    Anyone else have this problem? Does the interest fade with time? Any ideas?
     
  13. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    You need to nip that in the bud and nip hard. It's not a toy, it's a vital and time sensitive medical device, the whole point of having it is to look at it.:rolleyes:

    I would agree to set it on vibrate at school, I would not raise the high alert to 300 and I would scold the crap out of any teacher, nurse or administrator who called checking a timely medical device a "major distraction".

    In the end, your son will stop looking at it so often once it's no longer novel but I would not "admit" any wrong doing on your kid's behalf. Don't even give them that. He's doing a good thing and it will settle down, but I'd be furious with the teacher and even more enraged at the nurse.
     
  14. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Also, I sent a quick note to all my kid's teachers on the first day of school including this,




    "You will be getting material from the nurse after our 504 meeting in mid-Sept., but in the meanwhile, please be advised that Maddie wears two medical devices both of which will occasionally alarm (she keeps them set on low at school, but they may still be audible to you or others). She does her best to prevent drawing any attention to her medical issues but please do not assume that she is using her phone if she beeps or if you see her interacting with either device."

    You might want to do something similar for your son's teachers to preempt any future comments.
     
  15. hawkeyegirl

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    I agree.

    One thing you might consider is making it easier for him to look at it without pulling it out of the Spibelt. We got a tallygear case for ours, and he just wears it on his pump belt. He can just pull his shirt up and push the button to see what is going on without having to pull the receiver out.

    But yeah, I would NEVER discourage him from looking at the Dex. It's not like he's also playing Minecraft on there or something. :rolleyes:
     
  16. dshull

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    To clarify - I do think he is looking at it multiple times in class when it is not even vibrating. Partially because he is curious what the number is, and probably sometimes because whatever is going on in class is not so interesting and it gives him something to do. Like when I am bored in a waiting room and I pick up my phone.

    I agree 110% that it is a medical device and is necessary. But I am trying to figure out how to convey to my son to keep it in his pocket until he either feels low or it vibrates.

    I should also mention that in the last three weeks, he has started the pump and now dexcom, so there is a lot of newness and excitement in all of this.

    I am open to ideas on what to do about this!
     
  17. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I reiterate.

    I would not say anything to him. Zip.

    I would come down hard on the nurse and the teacher.

    He will stop. It's just not all that interesting, but even if he pulls it out and leaves it on this desk ALL DAY LONG there's nothing wrong with that. It's a graph, it's not all that fun, he will tire of it. But the nurse and teacher need to shut up about it and need to be forbidden from saying a single word about it to your son.

    Just my 2 cents.
     
  18. KatieSue

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    Mine's in high school but she usually leaves hers out on her desk when she's in class. Then pushes the button to look when she's curious. Not as much distraction as pulling it out from a pocket etc.
     
  19. Beach bum

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    When my daughter got hers I emailed her teachers and stated its a medical device that is a valuable tool in helping to keep her safe at school. It is also an addition to her diabetes care system. I said that since this is new she will be checking it frequently to reassure herself and to please be patient with her. We got her a clear front Tally gear case.

    I would have a word with all teachers and nurse. Your child is being alert to his condition, so he needs to check. I would let them know that he is not to be called out on this, it is not a negative thing to check. My daughter checked in the beginning constantly. He teacher filled me in and asked if it was ok for her to keep it on the desk since he felt it would just be easier and less distracting for her (than to tuck it away and dig out over and over). In time, the novelty of it wore out and she started responding to the alerts only (for the most part).
     
  20. Mish

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    Looking at it when he wants is good. Don't discourage that behavior. Eventually he'll get bored with it, like others have said, but for now, let him enjoy the newness and fun of it all.
     

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