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  1. tmlee5

    tmlee5 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2008
    Messages:
    2
    My 18 year old type 1 son (dxd at age 7) has severe depression and is non-compliant. He is currently taking medication and seeing a therapist but he needs more. We are seeking treatment options. Does anyone know of a place that specifically deals with type 1 and depression? We are looking into Cumberland Hospital but have heard a few bad stories. ANY info would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. grantsmom

    grantsmom Approved members

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    Jul 29, 2008
    Messages:
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    Hi

    I cannot help but wanted to just wish you and your son the best. HUGS
     
  3. mikesmom58

    mikesmom58 Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2008
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    I live in NJ so I'm not able to offer any suggestions but just want you to know what your son is feeling is not unusual for a young person. My son is 14 and goes through periods where he is very depressed, mostly due to his diabetes right now but even before he was diagnosed he suffered with it. We've tried therapy, he won't cooperate so we stopped after 2-3 sessions several times. We tried antidepressant meds, they didn't help him after awhile. We are running out of options and just praying that once he is over puberty he will level off and become more accepting of his situation. He's doing pretty well right now, relatively compliant with his care altho he still won't carry his meter with him when he goes out with his buddies. He will automatically check himself and correct his high BG as soon as he gets home. So he is getting much better. I hope your son can find a way to overcome his depression and realize how lucky he is to have parents who love and care about him as well as the ability to control his condition and stay healthy. It's a very hard thing for a kid to understand why this happened to him. Talk is very important so keep him in therapy if possible, being patient with him is vital, try not to lose your temper no matter how frustated you become, and just show him how much he is loved.

    Hope things get better for him soon, and you as well. Take care.
     
  4. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    8,240
    I personally do not embrace the term non-compliant. Diabetes is difficult. Some endocrinologists and endocrine teams are much more skilled than others in conveying how to work diabetes tasks into one's life and empowering their patients to feel ok or good about doing what is necessary. It takes a lot of empathy (and resistance to judge the patient), on the practitioner's part. It takes time to work with a patient to understand where he/she is on the spectrum of feeling motivated for change. Surely with depression, it's even more difficult.

    Does his therapist understand diabetes? If the therapist and psychiatrist aren't helping, it may be time to seek others. Generally the medications need to be monitored closely - at least monthly initially by the psychiatrist/psychopharmacologist until significant improvement is experienced. High blood sugar certainly exacerbates the depression.

    It's not easy for mom either! Please know people here care.
     
  5. bgallini

    bgallini Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2008
    Messages:
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    I'm sure you've thought of these options but just in case...

    Have you tried finding a diabetes support group for him with other teens? Or an online support group? Or a depression support group?

    Is he still in high school? Does he do any activities or sports? Would he consider joining some group or getting more active with a group he's already part of?

    Or maybe a part time job?

    Meeting other kids his age and finding something in common with them (job, sport, school club, diabetes) might help him.

    Does he not take care of his diabetes b/c he doesn't want to test or take shots or do other things in front of other kids? Maybe if he met other kids with diabetes, he might be more willing to care for himself? Maybe you can set it up (w/o his knowlege of the plan) for him to meet a college student with diabetes or another young adult who is older than him.

    Or maybe you can get him to volunteer to help younger kids with or w/o diabetes

    I've heard of the Cumberland Hospital. It's in VA right? But I don't know anything about it. I think any bad stories on a place would be a bad sign. Alex is 18 and I wouldn't want to send him off to some place that wasn't going to be wonderful.

    Maybe you can ask on the adults type 1 board and maybe some of them have heard of it or know of someone who has been there.
     
  6. bgallini

    bgallini Approved members

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    I just googled Cumberland Hospital and it is very close to where I live. I had never heard of it before joining this list and it was just someone else asking about it.

    Again, I don't know anything about it but I'll see if I can find out more.
     
  7. Dx011106

    Dx011106 Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2008
    Messages:
    30
    Agreed with Ellen, non-compliant is not a very friendly term. I am sure it is a frustrating and upsetting situation, but it is hard to judge the scenario unless you have personal, daily experience dealing with this disease and your body's handling of it. It took me two years to realize that my doctors truly had my best interest at heart. I was given the time and chance to make decisions for myself. I learned that high blood sugars made me feel terrible. In fact, I found I became more depressed/agitated when my sugar levels were higher/less even. I'm not on a pump and my A1c is constantly better. But I am doing this on my own, with help and input from others. I'm almost 21 and my parents are glad they let me do this on my own. It's a learning and growing process (diabetes and life in general). I feel like I'm rambling, but the most important thing/advice I can give is to provide your son with support, love and guidance. I have a GREAT team of doctors (endo, psychiatrist, gen. MD, etc.) and a great family helping me make the right decisions (even if it takes a while).
     

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