- advertisement -

Depression with teens with Diabetes

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by Bigbluefrog, Oct 26, 2010.

  1. Bigbluefrog

    Bigbluefrog Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2010
    Messages:
    563
    Curious about those who have experienced depression with their teenagers? I have read that it is common with teens without chronic illness to feel down and sad at times. Is depression more significant with our children?

    My daughter is 14 and has scoliosis and diabetes, so she wears a brace and a pump. Last night she was in tears about being different. She said she didn't want to feel like a weirdo and had tears in her eyes. She is even reserved in her sadness, her eyes watered and I had to pull it out of her what was bothering her.
    IT broke my heart to see her struggling with her appearance. She is beautiful to me and her inner beauty is amazing. She rarely complains and has been very responsible with her diabetes. I often wonder if pulling inward is worse than letting it all out. Maybe it would be better to have a full blown crying session...get all that pent up frustration out.

    Can you relate to this?
    Please do share.

    What do you do to help?

    I understand therapy, but I don't think we are at that level yet. I have taken her shopping to hide her brace, but sometimes she just wants to be normal...what does that even mean anymore? We all have crosses to bare.
     
  2. Lee

    Lee Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Messages:
    9,633
    Talk about timing!

    Well, Coco us 12 1/2 - so an almost teen. And she has been having some explosions of emotion (OK - overwhelming temper tantrums) where she says she hates herself, she hates her life, no one understands...We have talked to her about therapy and she is VERY against it, but I started looking around. The explosions usually happen at her dad's house, so I never really understood how bad it was until she had one at my place this weekend.

    So - we talked once she calmed down. and I told her that talking to someone could help her deal with her emotions, it isn't a bad thing. She agreed to try.

    We talked it over and decided on Art Therapy. When she was little, I used to have her color when she got to such an extreme state of frustration, and that really helped her calm down. She loves all forms of art, so I think this is a good choice for her.

    I talked to one of my friends who is an art therapist and she recommended someone close by. Said that it really helped with teen girls. So, I called today and found out that my insurance accepts her, and I left a message for an appointment.

    I really thought it was baloney when my friend went for her Art Therapy Degree. I chuckled inside, thought it was hokey. But after talking to her about it, and having her just briefly talk to Coco, I now think it is a good thing.

    (ETA - Coco has scoliosis as well, but no brace, but she does have a great big honking metal brace on her leg right now~)
     
  3. Bigbluefrog

    Bigbluefrog Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2010
    Messages:
    563
    Coco sounds like My daughter, she loves art too. I will look have to find some art therapy.

    Is it just normal hormone surges? Or more a d frustration issue?
    Remembering my teen years, I would think both. She is trying to fit in at hs.


    We sat down and talked about her feelings and why she was frustrated. She was saying look at me mom I got more things attached to me, and I just want to be normal.


    She is missing her brothers, they are both in college and one is going into the Marines.

    They are very close.....and more changes coming.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2010
  4. KRenee

    KRenee Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Messages:
    322
    My daughter is 14, too. Some days are just too much for her to handle. We talk alot. I listen a lot. I encourage her that she is strong enough to handle whatever life throws at her, but I'm there as backup any time she needs it.

    And I tell her that the teen years are always the hardest - it will get better.
     
  5. Lee

    Lee Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Messages:
    9,633
    I don't know. My oldest has none of this...she has her drama, but not extreme drama. I also don't think it is D and other illnesses - I just think it her personality. She internalizes everything to the extreme, so when she gets overwhelmed - it is just a dumping of everything. After a couple of hours, she is happier then ever before (I am a little worried about manic...I just hope not). It is like you can see the weight has lifted off of her shoulders.
     
  6. Bigbluefrog

    Bigbluefrog Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2010
    Messages:
    563
    Personality does play a big part, my daughter tends to be more laid back and very quiet. She would be happy reading a book.

    We went to a support group for Scoliosis, and I found it did not help her at all, socializing wasn't what she needed. I think her personality would benefit from the art therapy...like Your dd.
     
  7. Bigbluefrog

    Bigbluefrog Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2010
    Messages:
    563
    Your right Karen, Some days are too much to handle.

    I like the way you stated that...we are here for their support when the day gets too heavy.
     
  8. Bigbluefrog

    Bigbluefrog Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2010
    Messages:
    563
  9. Mody_Jess_Pony

    Mody_Jess_Pony Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2008
    Messages:
    1,525
    I have D, Clinical depression(I have had clinical depression for almost 11 years) I was in 4th grade when I saw my first Psych.
    I was an emotional teen, and having D and another condition can be draining combined, can she see a counselor even if you aren't depressed sometimes just having an impartial person to listen can be helpful, self-esteem issues are also linked heavily with depression.
     
  10. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,626
    My son went through some pretty tough stuff this summer. For him sending him to Diabetes camp really pulled him out of it, are there resources like that you could consider? He went into camp sullen and withdrawn and came back positive and joyful (and has remained mostly so with normal teenage ups and downs).

    Things like our Walk for a Cure, days where we can't get a handle on numbers, things like that can pull him down again, but he now seems better able to handle it. He struggled all during the walk, pulled it together because he had so many friends there, but I could tell it was very hard for him to be there.

    I think it's fairly normal and expected to struggle at this age, add in a chronic disease and it's ripe for emotional issues.
     
  11. Bigbluefrog

    Bigbluefrog Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2010
    Messages:
    563
    Diabetes camp is an excellent way to help our kids deal with this disease and know its not just them dealing with it. It opens up communication, and know that you are not alone. I thought camp was great.

    We have two issues my dd is dealing with~ a back brace for scoliosis and Diabetes. She also wears a pump. At age 14, she likes to be able to fit in with her peers. She says its tough at times, but she has made some good friends who see the person not the D or the brace.

    As a parent, I would tend to see the D first, especially in the beginning, now I try to put that in the background and see my daughter first as a person.
    Unfortunately we can't just ignore D or her back issues...its the spot on the window that is always there......we try to see beyond it.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice