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DD choosing Omnipod or Ping

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Lakeman, Oct 25, 2014.

  1. caspi

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    I'm sure you've read about our issues with the Omnipod so I won't rehash them for you. :wink: I was concerned about my son being tethered to a tube as well but since starting on the t:slim he has had zero complaints about it. If anything, he says it's less noticeable and he sleeps better at night as the pod was bulky on his arm or back and he was always aware of it. With the t:slim, his site is on his belly and the pump slips right into his shorts or pants pocket. The only downfall, if you will, is searching for the pump if I need to do a correction in the middle of the night. :wink:

    Considering the age of your daughter, I honestly wouldn't let the idea of tubing sway you one way or the other. Prior to going on the t:slim, I always thought of tubed pumps as though my kid would have to drag along a garden hose all day long and it would constantly be getting in the way, etc. I was completely wrong. As I previously said, my son says it's actually less obtrusive than the Omnipod. The size of the t:slim itself is only 3" x 2" and 0.6" thick and the infusion sites lay flat on his body. He plays tennis and basketball with no problems at all.

    The only thing I will add about the screaming pods is that I was personally told by Insulet two months ago that they know that this is an ongoing issue and that they are working to resolve it. My son just couldn't wait any longer. 10 months was long enough. As for how many people are dealing with this issue, I don't know. But I do know that there are many people on the t:slim FB page that have switched from Omnipod to the t:slim for the same reason as we did.

    Good luck with your decision! :smile:
     
  2. hawkeyegirl

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    Honestly, if you can scrape together $199.00, this is a no-brainer. Run the Ping through insurance, and pay OOP for a PDM. You will always have a backup pump, and can switch back and forth as is convenient for you.
     
  3. Lakeman

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    Still not sure what to think of all this. I am starting to wonder if maybe the perception should be more like "both are great and have their advantages and disadvantages" rather than "one is better than the other." Is that how some of you would see it or is one really better for some?

    If both are great maybe I should scrape together the $199 to get the Omnipod as a back up. On the other hand I have tried hard to see any reason to justify spending $199 of hard earned money to get two pumps for reasons that seem to be not all that important when maybe just one pump would work great. I sat down and talked with the diabetes counselor and the t-slim representative ( she happened to be there) and none of us saw a clear strong reason to have two pumps. The best reason I can think of to have two pumps is that I don't need to make the decision. And in all honesty I am perfectly happy with MDI and we have good A1C's this is driven by my DDs desire to do what the other kids at camp did. I am not going to judge that and if it breaks up the never ending demand of diabetes for her I am for it.

    So far I like that the Omnipod is tubeless, sticks on the body anywhere (meaning more pump site rotations), is not all that expensive it if gets lost or stolen, is actually a smaller amount of stuff for her to carry around, and I like the automatic insertion. Our biggest complaint is that it is kind of hard to remove and as an item stuck on her body is kind of big (though is another pump in the pocket any less of a problem than one stuck on the tummy?) My DD likes that the Ping can be disconnected (but the Omnipod does not need to be disconnected). I guess my biggest worry is the screaming issue but it does not sound like that is huge. My biggest pros for the Ping seem to be that DD thinks it is cool, and that the tubes are not that big a deal. I guess the remote works from farther away but really is that important? If you can't tell I am leaning pretty strongly for the pod but don't want to make a mistake.
     
  4. MomofSweetOne

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    This pretty much sums it up. Bottom line is that they all administer insulin and allow for dosing that can more closely mimic the body's natural pattern than MDI typically allows. They allow for less shots. Mealtime stress is much less (I didn't expect this, but the change was huge for us.) There are features that we like and dislike on each pump. I'd love to be able to design a pump with the features we personally would like. Right now, a non-existent feature I would love is an extended bolus that can be programmed to start later than the initial bolus, like 3 hours later, to deal with fat issues. One less thing to have to remember later can be a stress reliever. Most of the time extended boluses work fine, but there are some foods we consistently get lows with before we see the need for more insulin.
     
  5. Megnyc

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    I have two comments:

    1. You seem to be a bit concerned about cost. One thing to keep in mind is that if your insurance coverage changes the pods are a lot more expensive than normal infusion sets. The insurance rate for a box of infusion sets for me is $78. It is $347 for a box of pods. That is a one month supply. Of course, I only pay 10% of that but plenty of people pay 20% or even more and that can really add up.

    2. I wear normal infusion sets everywhere. All over my legs, bottom, lower back, stomach, and upper arms. I only wear the pods on my stomach and lower back. I'm not so sure that you have more site possibilities with the pods.

    You don't have to get 2 pumps now. You could always get the Ping and if your daughter ends up wanting the pod you still have the option to get it in the future.
     
  6. StacyMM

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    Since she became interested because of the pumps at camp, was there one that really pushed her to make the switch? Other kids her age would have been able to tell her as users what they liked and disliked about each one and reviewing that might help sway her. For us, it was never really a question - each time we started with a new pump, there was a clear winner after the demos. The medtronic was a good fit when we started out. When DD and DS both started pumping, the were both most impressed by the OmniPod, so that's what we did. When my daughter gave up on the pods, she fell in love with the T:Slim. There was just no comparison each time. I've tried to talk my son into changing and was surprised by his choice - if he ever switched to a tubed pump, he really liked the Ping...and that's one that I've demoed multiple times and just don't like (it's just me - nothing against the pump at all. I find their menus to be awkward)...so everyone is different and sees different things in a pump. If she can't decide, maybe suggest that she give it more time and make that decision when she's more ready? While having a spare PDM has it's convenience (we can use it as a backup or when situations are easier because of it) I wouldn't have bothered to get one at the same time as another pump. Whay spend the money on something you don't really plan to use? And, honestly, whatever pump she ends up will end up feeling the most normal to her because it's what she gets used to. Change is hard enough without trying to learn two things at once!
     
  7. hawkeyegirl

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    The number one reason to have two pumps is that you always have a back-up if one goes belly up. The transition between pumping and MDI is not seamless for most kids, and speaking for ourselves, if we had to go to MDI for a couple of days, his BGs would be all over the place. The second reason to have two pumps is convenience. There are times a pod is more convenient, and times a tubed pump is more convenient. For us, the two times a pod is more convenient is when he's wearing certain clothing, and when he's doing all day water stuff. He also thinks he'd be happier wearing a pod during football season, so we may try that next year.

    I don't think a Pod gives you more site options. You can put a traditional infusion set anywhere you can put a pod and vice-versa. When we use the Pod, we have to carry more stuff around, because we feel like we have to carry insulin if we're more than 20 minutes from home. I also feel like I have to carry 2 or 3 pods, because I don't trust them not to fail on priming. The PDM is also much larger than his tubed pump, which is an issue. The PDM is cheaper if it is lost or stolen, but is much more likely to be lost or stolen, because it's not attached to your kid. Comparing the remotes, I don't like either one of them, but I think the PDM is generally better than the Ping remote. You can dose farther away from the Ping remote, true, but you have to keep the remote in range of the kid while it delivers. Once the PDM starts delivering, the kid can walk away from the remote without issue.

    For us, having used both, I like both of our tubed pumps (Medtronic and now t:slim) far better than the Pod. See my current thread on how to deal with the Pod at school. It is a logistical pain. But the times where the Pod is more convenient MORE than justifies the $199 we paid for it, as well as the peace of mind of having a back up pump.
     
  8. KatieSue

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    I think the main issue with cost is that if you go with the Ping and she doesn't like it, you can for an additional cost, switch to Omnipod. If you start with Omnipod and decide that it doesn't work for you and want to switch to the Ping you can but for a significantly larger cost. That's not to say she won't fall in love with one of them out of the box and never want to try the other. But if you do have issues with either one it's easier to switch if you do cut the cord than if you just go straight omnipod.

    I think pumps are kind of like cell phones. They do basically the same things but you're going to have apple lovers and android lovers. Doesn't mean either are better just different. And some of the quirks of one are okay for some users and not for others.
     
  9. chalke43

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    I think there is a lot of truth to this statement. We have both the t-slim and pod (sorry, no experience with ping). When he is on the t-slim he says he likes the pod so much better. After a week or two of this, he switches to the pod and then swears he likes the t-slim so much better. And so on, back and forth.

    For us, we have issues with placement of the pod. He finds it very bulky and hard to place. He has a lot of absorption issues with it (this may be related to the angled cannula). However, he loves that it is basically invisible and he can bolus very very discreetly. We've only had two screamers so far, and they were both while on a beach vacation. I'm guessing they were heat/sweat/water related.

    We have much better consistency of BG numbers on the t-slim for whatever reason. His problem with it is that it is much more visible and the tubing can be problematic (mostly re: pump falls out of pocket while sitting. He then stands without realizing it and it swings around.)
     
  10. caspi

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    Very well said.
     
  11. MEVsmom

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    My daughter has a Ping and has not tried the Pod, other than the non-functioning trial version. She liked the idea of it, but I laid down the law. If I can get the PDM for $199 with cut the Cord then it made no sense to have insurance pay for it when the Ping is $5-6,000. What if she loves the Pod, Great, but if she hates it or it just doesn't work for her for some reason, you are stuck.
     
  12. rgcainmd

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    One screaming Pod, which was quickly and easily silenced with a paper clip, since we've been using the OmniPod. And it wasn't very loud (I have keen hearing.)
     
  13. rgcainmd

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    You are not stuck. There is a 90-day return period.
     
  14. Melissata

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    My daughter used Omnipod for 5 years, is now happily using the tSlim. She does still have the Omnipod for a back up pump, but since she uses less insulin with the tSlim it won't be a seamless thing if she ever has to use it. One thing that no one has mentioned here that is an issue for a lot of people is that the adhesive can cause problems that regular infusion set does not. It doesn't happen immediately for most people. We ended up trying everything to prevent actual scabs from forming under her pods. We did find a good barrier product finally, but it is pricy. We also almost always had to use Skin Tac or Mastisol and an adhesive remover to keep them on, all of which adds to the cost as well. We had all of the issues with pods that most people go through, pods coming off, pods screaming, PDM shutting down for no good reason and needing to be replaced several times. Because of the skin issues, she could only wear the pods on her arms, where the skin was a bit tougher. Once the smaller pods came out and using the new barrier product, she was able to wear them on her abs some of the time. She has none of those problems with the smaller infusion set that she is using with the tubed pump. She hated the constant beeping to alert to needed to change a pod soon, and with a tubed pump you don't have to change it at an exact time like you do with the pods.

    We were able to get insurance to pay for the tSlim even though the Omnipod was still in warranty, but it took months and the endo had to get involved. We had done the first Omnipod with Cut the Cord but then let insurance pay for the next one. I really wished that I hadn't done that and had looked more closely at the tSlim at that time.
     
  15. hawkeyegirl

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    It is 45 days from the date the product is shipped.
     
  16. DavidN

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    I've never seen it put like this but I think this ^^^ is why my son chose the pod.
     
  17. andiej

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    Ok i can only comment on the Omnipod as it's the only pump we have used. I was concerned about screamers before making our decision but after visiting another child using the omnipod who had previously used an animas pump and was loving it without issues, we made the decision. Now pumping 6 months in it was the right decision for us. We had one pod squeal in 6 months that occured during a pod change. It wasn't an issue just changed the pod and smashed it with a hammer which my son enjoyed doing. From being on a parents page on facebook i think issues happen with all pumps, i've seen posts about air bubbles (something that doesn't seem to be an issue on the pod), bent cannulas etc. However i do think when people have a problem with a pod they are quick to blame the pump as it's an all in one device, people on tubed pumps i've never seen blame their brand of pump for air bubbles and bent cannulas etc. Also one other thing i've noticed most people love the pump they are using. They all do the same job, each has benefits that the others don't have. What we did was right a list of the things that were important to us, they were auto insertion, waterproof, separate handset and my son preferred the idea of tubeless, i was tempted by integrated cgms in other pumps but decided if we went the cgm route we could always get it separately. Each person has a different wish list but that was ours and our reason behind choosing the Omnipod. There is a great group called Omnipod Users on Facebook which is great for advice from people currently using it. Good luck with whatever you choose.
     
  18. caspi

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    With the Omnipod, the pod IS the pump and they have a history of stopping and screeching "Pod Error" alarms. Occlusion alarms are one thing - that can be caused by a bent cannula or bad placement (similar to what someone on a tubed pump would have with their infusion site) but "Pod Error" alarms are when the pod just stops working. I honestly haven't heard of many pumps that have had this happen but it is an ongoing issue with the Omnipod.

    There are many people that have had no issues with the Omnipod. We were one of those customers for 5 years. And just to be clear here, I don't reply to these posts to turn people away from the Omnipod. As I said, my son used to love it and wore it for 5 years. I just want people to be aware that there IS an ongoing issue with them that Insulet claims to be working on.
     
  19. Lakeman

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    Just had the final discussion with DD and DW today. We were looking at Ping and Omnipod because they both shared a lot of qualities that we liked. After reading this thread we decided to take your advice and get the Omnipod through cut the cord. The deciding factor was that we were so undecided that we knew we could be making a decision we might regret later in some ways. Once the decision was made to do that then it occurred to us that these two pumps were a lot alike and maybe we would be better off with two pumps that were less alike. Solution: runner up was T-Slim. So now we feel pretty good about having insurance pay for T-Slim and getting Omnipod on our own. I was a bit worried about both Ping and T-slim only having 200 unit cartridge and now that worry is less.
     
  20. MomofSweetOne

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    I think your daughter will be pleased with the options. At least mine is. There are times she prefers the pod, and times she just can't take its noise and demands any more. But, she definitely would be sad to loose the freedom it provides at times.

    I don't know how much hassle the 200 unit cartridge will be. We have the 300 unit Medtronic, and we've never "needed" the whole reservoir. We fill it and refill it when it's empty. It goes way beyond the 3 day change for the site. We never fill the pod to the full 200 units, either, since it expires in 3 days and my daughter's TDD is typically around 55 units.
     

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