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Daycare

Discussion in 'School and Daycare' started by zell828, Feb 22, 2008.

  1. zell828

    zell828 Approved members

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    My 8 year old stepdaughter was diagnosed last week. I have had the same daycare for 6+ years. She is an at home licensed daycare and watches other kids as well. We get my daughter for half the summer, so the daycare was watching my other child (who is 6) all summer and then on the weeks we had my stepdaughter she was watching both. Now that we found out my stepdaughter is Diabetic and needs insulin, my daycare is really hesitant about taking her. She claims she can't give shots without "specific training" from a hospital and she isn't sure if she can do it because she has a phobia with needles. It's just one more thing to worry about now. I have no idea if I have daycare now for the summer. :(
     
  2. Tamara Gamble

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    Use a school day care or a day care that accepts checks from the state. If they do they are fedrally funded and must accomodate your child. Training can be done at no expense by a nurse from your office or hospital.

    Tami
     
  3. decota'smom

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    yes they have to take you're diabetic child but they do not have to give insulin or check bs .....I have just recently gone through this with my son and eventhought we started on a pump it makees no difference to the state...they say that giving insulin is a medical procedure and should only be given by lisc. profecionals.....but we live in west virginia ....if there is a kindercare in you're area look into there they were sued on med related issued and have to do all procedures GOOD LUCK
     
  4. Mama2H

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    If the provider takes state pay kids or is on the food program she is federally funded and bound by the same laws the schools are. Offer to have your endo train her.
     
  5. blessed

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    I was a provider in WA state for 13 years and specialized in care for children with diabetes and asthma so I am pretty familiar with how many providers feel about diabetes. Here is my experience and thoughts for what it is worth. I would never force or press the issue. She might "comply" but would she really be doing it whole heartedly? I don't think so. You might try offering education about it. See how she responds. Sometimes the unknown is scary for providers and they are worried they will be held liable if they don't do things perfect for diabetic children. Perhaps she has no idea what the state would require of her. ie...medication in a daycare setting can be time consuming. Our state has strick regulations about administering medications to children. So, it could be fear. From my experience, I would NOT force her to take your child. It could prove to be a bad situation for your child. If she doesn't really want to do it,,,, I wouldn't make her. Kinda the old saying you can lead a horse to water....Yes, you could force her to, but would it be the BEST for your child....I loved having other children with diabetes in my childcare, but then again I am a Mom to a child with diabetes, and I have type 1 as well. I am by no means saying it is right for her to refuse care, but would it be best for your child to have him with someone who isn't wanting him to be there. Just my thoughts...
     
  6. Mama2H

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    I do agree with Dayna, if you force her it would not be the best situation for your SD. Offer to have the endo train her and if she is willing try to introduce her to what you would want. If not, look for a provider willing to learn.
     
  7. zell828

    zell828 Approved members

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    Update:

    The problem is I live in a town of 3,000 people. We do not have anything but family run daycares here. I know it would be virtually impossible to find anyone else. My daycare provider has also been my bf for 30 years. I know she is scared, but I also know that she will do the best she can when she does have her, I trust her completely. I work only several blocks away and I am just a phone call away. Plus, we have now arranged it so I will be doing all the shots. I will give breakfast and her shot, and then for lunch I will run over there and give her the shot. So basically my bf only has to watch for lows/highs and treat. My SD already pokes her finger herself. We did also have a training session at our house last Thursday evening where my family and bf came over. I also made up a diabetic guide for her with specific details of everything. Hopefully once she starts watching her then her fears will subside.

    Thank you for all the answers :)
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2008
  8. bgallini

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    I'm glad you've gotten it worked out. It's not perfect but it's a start and you have child care for the Summer. Give your provider some time. Needles, etc can be scary to people but once she sees how simple it is, she may be willing to try. It might be good to see if someone from your endo's office might give her some training on testing, glucagon, etc just so she feels more comfortable with everything but to be honest, knowing providers, it might be best to wait until SD is in care already. Then the provider will feel too guilty to say, 'no way, not gonna do it.' We providers have a soft spot for kids and can overcome many fears just to take care of them (spiders & puke in my case). Just keep the lines of communication open. Try not to sound like you are putting more demands on her. Try to make it sound like you are trying to make things easier on her and all the kids.
     
  9. Kaileen

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    There is always hope. My husband was scared to death of needles and hospitals. But he was in the operating room with me during both c-sections, and he was the first one trained to give Deirdre her injections. If he can do it, anyone can!
     

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