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Daughter cannot check herself at night...

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by parentsofk, Jul 14, 2018.

  1. parentsofk

    parentsofk Approved members

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    Our daughter has had type 1 since she was 1, now she is 16. We have been the ones to check her BS at night all these years - she doesn't and cannot wake up herself - even when she sets multiple alarms.

    She is going away to a camp next week, and we are quite concerned about this. We've been trying to "practice" having her wake herself up - we end up having to go in and shake her (gently!) awake repeatedly before she comes around! Anyone faced this and came up with a good solution?

    Thanks
     
  2. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

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    I'm completely with you...but with an 18-year old that has been gone for things since age 15 and then away the last two summers. However, what I've learned is that, at least sometimes, the kid that sleeps like the dead when Mom's around wakes easier when it's on them to have to do so.

    That said, I try to always have back-up numbers in an emergency of non-waking. I used one once last summer, and she was in the 40s when I called and called and couldn't wake her.

    Do you have Dexcom & Share or is she just trying to wake to alarm clocks? We have my daughter's nighttime low set to 80 so that low sleepiness isn't part of the reason she's not waking. One thing we've done is to set the alarm sounds to different ones than the attentive she's slept through for 7 years. We also use the pump and the phone so that more than one device is going off but with different sounds.

    This summer she has an insane schedule and two roommates. I can't tell you how many 55 & below alerts I've had, even though she has two roommates, ages 24 and 17, who also sleep through the alarms most of the time. Thus far, she's woken to phone alarms this year, though once I had to call 22 or more times before getting her to wake. By then the adrenalin rush is so bad, I'm wake and shaking for the next two hours.

    This letting go process with nighttime lows is soooo hard.

    Edited to add: If she'll be at camp, you can ask the camp nurse/can to do night checks like at diabetes camp. It's a reasonable accommodation. We always asked and received it for the years she returned to the non-D camp she'd attended prior to diagnosis. We've just moved into the adult world, but friends are awesome about being backup numbers, etc. in our experience.
     
    rgcainmd likes this.
  3. kim5798

    kim5798 Approved members

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    How did the time away go?
    I do not know how you moms get the notifications from far away & not go insane!! I am on the "what I don't know can't hurt me" plan & it has served me just fine for the first 2 years of college. This year, she is living in the same apartment, but is now sharing a bedroom with her original college dorm mate & I am happy about it. I didn't like her being in a room alone...when maybe no one would notice if she didn't wake up, or notice her cgm alarming.

    hope if went well! give us the update!
     
  4. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

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    I have the alarms set to 55 & below and over 250 for over 3 hours, so in theory, I shouldn't hear from them often. The alerts I get have significantly decreased the longer she's been away the past few months. However, we're not ready to completely turn off alarms. She managed to achieve a dream she'd held since age 3 last summer despite T1D, and a coma or seizure would rob her of that instantly. It's not worth that risk to us.
     
    rgcainmd likes this.
  5. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

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    You win!!! Last year when my daughter was several hundred miles away at a marching band competition, I gave up after 20 calls went unanswered at around 4:00 a.m. as I watched my daughter’s BG descend into the 40s. Another 5 or so calls to the assistant director (whose mother and brother have Type 1 and who agreed to be the primary contact person in the event I couldn’t reach my daughter) also went unanswered. I had to resort to calling a couple of chaperones before anyone answered their phone.

    After my daughter’s return, I told her I would have to chaperone all future overnight marching band trips if she didn’t answer her phone or sleep adjacent to someone who would awaken to her phone repeatedly ringing. Since this “threat”, either my daughter or one of her bunkmates has consistently answered my overnight calls within ten tries or less. (By call eleven, I start to lose my ... um, calm.)

    P.S. Congrats on your daughter’s achievement of her long-term dream!
     

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