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"cure" in Canada??

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Kaylee's Mom, Jul 25, 2010.

  1. Kaylee's Mom

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    So a friend was saying that another person was telling her (I know .. already so reliable right??) Anyway, that in Canada they are taking blood from a family members healthy pancreas and injecting it in the diabetics pancreas and after 4-5 times it is 80% effective in "curing" diabetes. Has anyone else read about this or heard of such a thing? Seems WAY to good to be true of course but I had to ask.

    Crystal
     
  2. AlisonKS

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    I've been told numerous times there is a cure in Canada, never heard of what exactly the cure is but it's sorta funny that those evil Canadians are hiding the cure!
     
  3. zapsmom

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    LOL! I am from Canada and I have not heard of this "cure". MMMMMM, Must find the other evil Canadians who are holding out on me! :)
     
  4. Kaylee's Mom

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    I know right .... where do people get these things from?
    Even though I KNOW it is crazy I still had to ask! :eek:

    Crystal
     
  5. Willy

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    We're holding out on our southern partners with water, oil sands and a cure for D, lol! Man, that sounds like it would be a wonderful, lovely and non invasive way of getting it done....sadly I have never heard of this, so I don't believe it exists.
     
  6. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    Perhaps they are talking about islet cell transplants (the Edmonton Protocol?).

    First off, this is not something they are doing with children.
    Second, it's not something they are doing with diabetics who do not have complications and/or severe lows (like passing out lows).
    Third, it's a series of transplants and requires that the person receiving the transplants take immunosuppressants.
    Fourth, it doesn't seem to last- it isn't always permanent.
    Oh, and fifth, I believe they transplant the islets into the liver or the peritoneal cavity, not into the pancreas.

    Here is a blog by a woman who has received an islet cell transplant four years ago: http://yayislets.blogspot.com/

    There's a little bit about pancreas transplantation on the CWD website, for example this guy writing about his transplant: http://childrenwithdiabetes.com/d_0c_1k1.htm

    Here's a piece by a guy who got a kidney pancreas transplant: http://kptransplant.tripod.com/mystory.html

    There are a couple of people who've been on the forums because their kid has diabetes and they or their spouse has had a pancreas transplant, but nobody really active.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    A few years ago, a South American team published their results after putting a group of newly diagnosed type 1s on chemotherapy and doing bone marrow transplants on them. They reversed the autoimmune process and in some cases the people are still not on insulin, but the side effects were pretty nasty. It was all over the news and I kept having people tell me that diabetes had been cured :mad:

    Transplants and chemotherapy and all that are exciting stuff but I wish they wouldn't tout it all over the news as this easy peasy panacea.
     
  7. Skyefire

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    HAHA I think people are a bit confused, they are talking about the Edmonton Protocol in Alberta. (islet transplants) The groundbreaking experimental procedure involves transplanting insulin-producing islet cells from the pancreas of an organ-donor. Islets are taken from cadavers, and like all transplants have to be a perfect match.

    There has been great results, but it is not a 100% cure, it is no different then a organ transplant, they must stay on anti rejection drugs, finding a match is very hard and then most people need at least 2-3 transplants to have it work to the best of the treatment. I met a wonderful woman named Deborah Sissmore, at the JDRF Annual General Meeting this year, who had the transplants and had lived insulin free for a while, and is back on a little bit of lantus now. But she still thinks it is the best thing she has ever done.

    Here is a youtube link about her talking about it.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S2NDTq3S_kE
     
  8. Skyefire

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    I agree 100%...it is amazing work! But I do not consider it a cure (IMO) it is a transplant. No different then a heart or kidney, very high risk. I would not consider it for my ds if they were doing it with children, because of the other risks added on top. Life time drug therapy and high risk of illness due to the immunosuppressants. I think it is a step in the right direction, but personally not something I would search out for him. One of my biggest problems is if it works for 5-10 years then stops working and has to go back on insulin, he will not only have to keep taking the immunosuppressants because he had the transplant, but also back to injections and bg tests just like before, and still have the added risk from the immunosuppressants.

    There are many great things happening in canada for research, I learned about a few of them at the JDRF AGM, and I am very excited. Things still have a long way to go, but nice to see people are working for our cause!!

    BTW...You are right they graft on to the liver, not the panceas.
     
  9. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    If it gets rejected, they remove a transplanted pancreas and you do not keep taking immunosuppressants for it. I actually don't know if they can do that for islet cells or not, but I have read two books by people who got pancreas transplants, and both of them have had two because the first one got rejected, and those got removed. I've also had friends with kidney transplants whose transplanted kidneys have had to be removed.
    You do hear a lot of people whose transplants don't work as much, or who develop type 2 diabetes from the immunosuppressants. But I assume they keep the transplant because they think it is still helping somewhat.


    Oh, and the islet cell transplants AFAIK are from cadavers but partial pancreas transplants from relatives have been done.
     
  10. Skyefire

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    With Islet transplants it is the cells them self that are transplanted so you cant remove them. So even if they are only work 5% I was told they would still have to be on the drugs :( I spoke to one of the researchers and he said as of right now it is life long drug therapy.
     
  11. Emma'sDad

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    My friend Jason (from Canada) just celebrated his 5th year anniversary living on islets. His sugars were out of control before the operation. He is quite happy living with transplanted islets in his liver.

    Here's his blog. http://jasonturner.ca/blog/?p=367
     
  12. Skyefire

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    I saw that on your facebook...I think it is a truly wonderful thing. I love that people are using it and that it is working for them. If DS would like to go that route when he is older I will support him 100% :) I will have to follow his blog! thanks Tim
     
  13. ShanaB

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  14. kas77

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    That's cool. We banked our second child's stem cells from the umbilical cord blood. Hopefully we'll never need it.
     
  15. kiwiliz

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    So - your friend has had two cell transplants. I couldn't navigate through the blog easily. Can you tell me has he been insulin independant for all this time?

    I was looking at something and this ad came up;

    http://www.xcell-center.com/treatme...iabetes.aspx?gclid=CIfrwcOqkKMCFRhaiAod_A6ipA

    It is a company that does the same sort of thing but with your own stem cells. Haven't looked into it - but it shows there is a lot of encouraging work going on. It would be great if they could combine therapies with the encapsulating seaweed like LCT. It is just a matter of time.
     
  16. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    I'm in Canada, where's this cure, the Edmonton Protocol is just a more dangerous treatment plan, using anti rejection drugs that cause a host of other problems more serious then diabetes(
    I sat and listened to a woman lecture us on how happy she was to test her bg 4 times a day and to take anti rejection drugs while her hair thinned out and she had to avoid the sun and other things, oh and she was being checked every 3 months in case of cancer.
    I'll keep diabetes until there's a cure, not a treatment!
     

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