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Constantly "starving"

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by lcblk27, Jan 13, 2012.

  1. lcblk27

    lcblk27 Approved members

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    I feel like I cant feed my 5 year old enough. He was dx in July of this year. I know its common after dx for kids to be really hungry but could it be 7 months after? We did just get out a period of him running pretty high while we were adjusting his basal, could that be why? Now his numbers are in range much more often but he's still starving all the time. He always eats what I give him and he is pretty skinny but he just wants to eat all the time.

    I'd apreciate any advise.
     
  2. Charliesmom

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    My son was diagnosed 5 years ago and he is still like that. I am amazed at the amount of food the child eats. Last week at the Endo we were discussing why he sneaks food when on shots. He said he is starving all the time. She suggested increasing his protein. He will be 7 this summer.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2012
  3. cm4kelly

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    My son is almost 5 too.

    My son will be 5 next month, and right now he wants to eat all the time too. I have found over the last two years that I think he goes through growth spurts where he eats constantly for a few months and then his eating tends to drop off some. He is super skinny too.

    It certainly makes dosing difficult, but especially with a pump it is a lot simpler to deal with snacking.
     
  4. Amy C.

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    I would allow him to eat more food -- why not have a bigger snack in-between meals and give an injection if he eats lots of carbohydrates? That is the beauty of being on Lantus and Novalog -- your son can eat enough to fill himself up and get insulin for the food he eats.

    It is a pain to give multiple injections. Some find the pen easier to manage.
     
  5. Connor's Mom

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    My son was diagnosed when he was 7 and he's 10 now. He has done nothing but want to eat since he was diagnosed. He use to not want the extra shot so, he resorted to eating gum, YUCK! I had to sit him down and ask how hungry are you? He said starving so, we started giving bigger snacks and aimed for things that would satisfy him not just get by for a few minutes. I think it's just that boys are hungry. Lately his 13 year old brother has had the same type of appetite so, I never have food in the house!
     
  6. JaxDad

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    Exact same here; 7 yo son with D, 3 years post Dx. He mostly eats like a grown man and looks like a skeleton with skin stretched over it - (ok, that's a bit of an exageration):D
     
  7. lcblk27

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    Good to know Im not the only one experiencing this. We use the pens and I have no trouble giving him snacks, I just wish I could keep him full for 5 mins. I try to make sure he gets protien and fiber, but it just seems like whatever I feed him, he's hungry within minutes, it gets a bit tiring.
     
  8. JaxDad

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    It does, it definitely does. A couple things we've tried that may help.

    In order to help him feel "more full" we found that peanut butter snacks, or other snacks with some fat and protein help a bit. The fat can be a pita though as I'm sure you know. We also encourage drinking plenty of water, but so far the little horse we lead isn't that interested. :-(

    In order to give us a break from being waiter and waitress so much we put "free" snacks like sugar free jell-o, etc. where he can get to them and have specific rules about when it's ok to take them as wanted and when he has to ask first.

    Last - make sure he's not eating out of boredom.
     
  9. Style mom

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    My almost eight year old (D child) eats like a horse. My almost 5 year old (non-D) daughter would prefer to eat 42 tiny meals spread throughout the day. Between the two of them, I would spend my entire day in the kitchen preparing food if I didn't set some ground rules. They are:

    1. We have three meals and (if you want them) two snacks per day. If you didn't eat a reasonable quantity at the prior meal (in Mama's sole discretion), your snack will be the leftovers from that meal.

    2. Snacks are (reasonably) healthy. Crackers and cheese, PB and apple, PB and banana, yogurt, grapes, baby carrots and dip, cauliflower and hummus, etc.

    3. If you want food other than at a designated snack time, get it yourself and let Mama know that you're doing so. It must be healthy (see above snack choices).

    4. There is no snacking within an hour of meals. I will often put some carrots and dip or grapes out or let them eat their salad while I'm cooking if they're "staaaaarrrrrrrving", but other than that, you will not die if you have to wait for supper to be ready.

    At age 5, he's old enough to understand a similar set of rules, and he's old enough that if you put crackers and cheese and yogurt, etc. where he can reach them, he can get them himself if he's hungry and let you know that he needs a shot for them.
     
  10. Lisa P.

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    All of the above is great advice.

    One thing to make sure of, though, is that he's not super hungry for carbs because he has too much insulin. I'd spend a couple days really testing heavily to make sure you are seeing all the numbers. Selah is starving when she's low, and it doesn't have to be a low low -- it could be a fast drop, a deep drop, or sometimes even just a number like 80 with a lot of insulin on board. I'd elliminate the possiblity that he is feeding insulin and then, if that's not the case, just figure he's feeding himself and it's all good!

    Oh, also eliminate the possibility of thyroid problems, of course. They can go with diabetes, and even though 5 and male reduces the probability it's something to watch out for.
     
  11. MamaLibby

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    I have 5 kiddos who all eat all the time!! I have similar ground rules as above. Luckily my D-child is now 10 and can count her own carbs, or ask me and just enter it into her pump. When Ella was little I would keep small bowls of nuts and fruit on the table, so she could eat grab a handful as she pleased, but then Ella got D, Caleb was born, and Ella developed a nut allergy. So the days of leaving things out for them to grab as they please are pretty well. They do have access to drinks at all times though, and I keep water and kid-safe cups in areas where they can reach them.
     
  12. calebsmom1113

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    I seriously think we are twins! My son was dx'd at 7 and is 10 now. He eats like 1 16-yr-old!!! No matter how much he eats, it seems like he never gets full. I was told it's a chemical imbalance that makes their brain not register that they're full.
     
  13. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    I was hungry for about a year after dx, I think. The hunger was getting better by seven months but it was still there. It was sort of like having a body memory of the starvation period.
     
  14. Connor's Mom

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    I seriously do not know where he puts it! He did add a very tiny belly this year which, honestly, just gave me a spot to put his pump! I have to tell him when he's full and how long he needs to wait before he can tell me he's starving again. He can count his own carbs and we do have sugar free jello in the fridge at all times. We just found sugar free gelatin cubes in a package which he likes too. As long as he tests, tells me his number, yelled me what he wants and how many carbs it is, he can bolus for his own snacks. I just want to be aware of what he is eating and when.
     
  15. calebsmom1113

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    That's what we WERE doing too... until that last stunt he pulled over-bolusing himself (there's a whole thread on what he did). I used to let him test, report it to me along with his carbs and we'd bolus. Now, I have to watch him like a hawk so all he did was give me more work to do with all the free time I have. (Obviously being sarcastic!)
     
  16. MTMomma

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    Hunger

    Ds dx at age 5 and continued to have high levels of hunger for the first few years. He took in larger portions and ate more often than adult men yet was thin. It was sad to always have him feel unfilled. Numbers were good and no A1C problems. Some lows and a few that we really bad but not where you'd think he constantly was on too much insulin. At first we tried to supplement with low carb snacks or low sugar items. Then we started having him eat what he felt like he needed within reason. It meant many injections yet he didn't mind. Seriously it was years of him feeling starved even with huge intake. It slowly started to level out. Not sure what changed. At 14 he is very active and eats a balanced diet of typical portions yet no longer complains of hunger. The endocrine system is very complex. I wish we understood it better.
     
  17. azdrews

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    Just wanted to chime in that my 5 year old is the same!! He's been dx's for a year and a half, and he STILL eats all the freakin' time. :)
     
  18. Helenmomofsporty13yearold

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    Type 1's are also deficient in Amylin, a hormone that lets them know they are full. Also, artificial sweeteners have been proven to result in increased eating.
     

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