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Considering CGMS??

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by Gilliansmom, May 24, 2013.

  1. Gilliansmom

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    We are talking about trying CGMS for Gillian to see if that will help her get a better idea of what her trends are in her BGs and also to see if it helps her because of the way she likes to eat, (often). What are the pros and cons? recommendations? suggestions? thank you.
     
  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    We are having a good experience with the G4. Insertion is no big deal, it's not a fussy calibration, the color screen is nice, it has a good range, and the sensors last at least 14 days, and it's generally pretty accurate (either perfectly accurate most of the time but wildly off on occasion). Big improvement over the last system (mm) that we tried.
     
  3. MamaC

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    Device-resistant (refuses to pump, hated the CGM trial he did at 18) young adult male just started G4. I'm impressed; he's impressed and learning from it.
     
  4. Joretta

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    Saves us so many battles. Helps with reminding that she missed a bolus. Downside she gets fed up with it telling on her. So at first we had issues because I reacted. Now I simple get her pump and offer to do it for her if she would like. Much better reaction. I also made it a deal breaker for her license. Overall, she likes it and does her best to make sure she is wearing a sensor.
     
  5. Gilliansmom

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    Thanks. I'm going to look into the options and move forward with this. I'll keep you posted.
     
  6. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    On MDI the G4 is the only logical choice, imo. http://www.dexcom.com/dexcom-g4-platinum
     
  7. sab20619

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    Sarah,
    How do you get the g4 sensor to last 14 day? After 7 we are prompted to change it and if we don't, it stops on its own. I would love 14 days.
     
  8. Joretta

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    Just select shut off then select restart. It will go through the two hour start up but no change. My daughter is on dau 16 today. She never changes until it shows sign of needing it if is really crusted with skin tac but still peeling up.
     
  9. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Simple. "Stop sensor" and then "Start sensor" ;-) it will do the 2 hour warm up and then you're off and running
     
  10. cm4kelly

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    Especially with driving on the horizon -

    CGMs are wonderful for trends and eliminate so MANY(not all) fingersticks to monitor blood sugar. Especially with a teen, managing blood sugar can be a challenge. At school she could look at the receiver for trends (up and down arrows. Especially with driving on the horizon, I think a CGM would be a great thing to have.

    Maybe that might get her to think about it.
     
  11. sab20619

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    Wow! That is awesome. Thanks for the info...We will try it.
     
  12. sab20619

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    Thanks Sara. One more question...does doing this increase the risk of infection at all? Or affect accuracy of readings? I ask b/c my daughter is coming off 2.5 years of chemo and her risk of infection right now is higher than the normal kid, and after coming off chemo/steroids, her blood sugars have been crazy.
     
  13. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I would imagine that you might take greater care than we do at the time of insertion, possibly tape the site earlier (though what good that would do I can't say, lol, other than it would look neater), and you might remove a sensor with a little more attention, but overall no, the sensor fiber is sooooo very tiny and thin that it's hardly leaves any mark behind or evidence of irritation. That said, the insertion is so simple that changing it at the recommended time isn't onerous either ;-)
     
  14. Joretta

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    We find better accuracy up to 14 days to day 18 then we see some variation but not much. I would not go beyond 14 days if you need to worry about infection. While we have gone 22 days it was looking red an irritated. But never around day 14. But we clean a sterilize the area to start with.
     
  15. KatieSue

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    Mine's 18. She had zero interest in a CGM. Then we did a clinical trial for a week and she was more receptive. Then a few months later she went through one of those weird weeks where she just kept randomly having these huge drops that she wasn't feeling until they were low 40's so she asked if we could get one.

    She likes it in class because she can just look at it and see if anythings going on without dragging out her whole kit and testing. She does test if needed but she can just glance and see all's a-ok when she feels like it. It's also great while driving again just to glance at. She can pull over and adjust if needed.

    We usually get around 2 weeks out of them but by the end they're itchy. She'll take a break of a day or so in between sensors unless somethings going on then we'll put one on right away. I don't think she adores having it on her but she likes the data it provides. And she's old enough now to understand the trade off. For myself I love having it at night and I'm glad she got it before she's off to college next year.
     
  16. corrinebean

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    I'm curious about this - is this an alternative to a pump? My 13 yo is having some serious behavioral problems where his pump control is concerned - lying about his blood sugars to us and grandparents (multiple times now...and he's gotten quite creative at it), and now, most recently, found that he's only been taking junk (if anything at all) to school for his lunches. Have run the gamut of responses to his behavior from lectures by his endo, lectures by us, writing exercises, yelling, crying, grounding, and now just straight out disappointment for his poor choices. Am really starting to feel like a complete parenting failure for being unable to figure out how to connect with him on this. Have almost reached the point of pulling the pump away and moving back towards normal checks and manual boluses.
     
  17. Joretta

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    A CGM Is a continues glucose monitor it tells you your blood glucose based on calibration comparison you enter with the fluid in the cells.

    13 is not easy. I can give you advice that was given to me. Stop yelling, threatening and trying scare tactics they don't work on hormones independent stretching teens who brains are just not working right. Here is what I was taught: don't look at numbers don't discuss numbers focus on testing and dosing in silence by doing it for him but without a word. Before you start this sit down and calmly lay down the rules as follows. We understand your frustration even if we don't live it like you it stinks. Unfortunately you have two choices 1. Start testing treating and eating correctly. 2. We will take over care completely for you like a younger child. We will be everywhere you are and stay close to help keep you safe. Now when he choose option 1 then you let him fall you pick up with a consequence of a day side by side without a word about testing. When he should you hand him the meter not a word you then monitor his bolus without a word. Also not a word about his eating habits let him be away from you just make sure he takes insulin for it. I did this with my child after multiple missed tests and boluses and multiple days being treated like a little kid with me in tow. Not grounded at home I mean me following her schedule the stopped testing and blousing improved. After 7 days I let my child know she can ask me to take over anytime. Just leave her kit on the counter is our signal for my child's burnout break. No words just doing. By the way research shows stating consequence of poor care have no impact on teens. Also checkout Joe S videos on here they are great help.
     
  18. corrinebean

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    Thanks for the helpful feedback, Desiree - I may try that tactic. Glad to see that there are some individuals on who are nice enough to provide positive encouragement and support versus tell me I'm being a neglectful parent.
     
  19. Joretta

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    No problem, sorry to hear others aren't supportive. All kids are uniquic and some of the toughest ones to raise turn out the best.
     

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