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Confused about SAT accommodations

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by cockatiel, Jun 8, 2010.

  1. cockatiel

    cockatiel Approved members

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    I just got off the phone with the <wonderful> folks at the College Board. I am so confused!

    I don't WANT to go the accommodations route -- we homeschool, and finding a school that will allow my kid to take AP exams with accommodations will be an interesting trick! But given what the fellow at the College Board said, I don't see how any D kid can take College Board exams without accommodations!

    Me:
    My daughter wears an insulin pump. Can she wear it without accommodations?
    College Board: No.

    Me: Can she test her blood sugar between sections in the room?
    College Board: No

    Me: When and how can she test her blood sugar?
    College Board: Outside the room in the 5-minute break after sections 2, 4, and 6

    Me:
    Can she eat between sections?
    College Board: No. She can only eat after sections 2, 4, and 6 outside the room.

    When my older daughter (non-D) took the SAT, she nearly didn't make it back to the testing room in time because there was a line at the bathroom. So how can a diabetic kid take the SAT without accommodations?

    And why oh why do we subject our kids (not just D kids) to this round peg in a square hole process? My husband is diabetic and happily checks his blood sugar during meetings, etc.
     
  2. danismom79

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    I'm not sure I understand - why don't you want accommodations?
     
  3. cockatiel

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    1) The local private school where my older kids have done AP exams won't give AP exams with accommodations to students who don't attend the school.

    2) My public high school is reluctant to give homeschoolers AP exams to begin with. I don't want to hear what they have to say about giving them to a kid with accommodations! (And for less popular AP exams like Latin, my dd would almost certainly require an individual proctor.....the school will definitely not be happy about that!
     
  4. misscaitp

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    To get the accomodations it is going to require documentation, you don't necessarily need a 504 plan to acquire the College Board accomodations, but it certainly helps. What I personally recommend is that you get letters from your endo saying why your child would need each of the accomodations requested, and also studies that would back the doctors information. Most likely it will get approved titled 'minor accomodations'. It would be much harder if you were requesting extra time.

    I would also ask college board if a school can deny a homeschooler exams, it shouldn't matter if they're are minor accomodations.
     
  5. Ali

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    There may also be independent testing sites that will do accommodations. Ask the college board. Also I agree that there has to be a public school doing the AP exams with accommodations. Too many kids out there need them for physical handicaps-wheelchairs, sight, seizures, learning disabilities. Call the College Board and find out which schools or independent centers in your area are doing the accommodations. Plus I do not think it matters what the local school feels it is probably a state law that the local school accommodate home schoolers. But check your state laws. :cwds:ali
     
  6. Amy C.

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    It is good that they allow these accommations for kids with diabetes. The rules are pretty strict and a Type 1 needs to be able to take the test, but to treat low sugars if they were high.

    I am pretty sure she can wear her pump.
     
  7. joan

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    My son just took the SAT's last weekend and a few months back, both without accommodations. He did not want any. He takes lantus and wears the pump so on test day he just did not wear his pump and brought a pen if he needed insulin. He takes the test in his own high school where the teachers know him so don't mind if he has opened candy on his desk (if he goes low, no noise from wrapper) but he doesn't do that . He tests himself in between sections and said when he came home that d had no impact whatsoever on his test. He has had d most of his life and doesn't have any special treatment because of d. It works for him but may not be right for everyone. This weekend he takes the ACT and I heard it is a longer test with less breaks, so I don't know how that will be.
     
  8. Daniel's Mom 1993

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    Daniel took the ACT in April without accomodations, he did not want them either..he did not have any trouble, I did worry a littlle that he would have a low but he did fine, the next time he takes it will be at his high school and the principal has already said he would be sure he has what he needs but the first time was at another school and he did not want me to get anything special. But I definitly think it is a personal choice for the child and parent.
     
  9. cockatiel

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    So in everyone's experience, does a D kid on a pump need accommodations for the pump?

    The fellow at the College Board told me that wearing the pump requires accommodations, but I asked the same question several months back and was told that as long as the pump didn't make any noise, it by itself didn't require any accommodations.
     
  10. StillMamamia

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    Maybe contact the ADA and check with them or any docs/forms they can email you?
    It would be strange if accomodations are needed for wearing an insulin pump.:confused:
     
  11. joan

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    I would call the school and ask to speak with a guidance counselor. I would explain the situation and say your daughter wears an insulin pump. It will not make noise during the test. They probably have had students before with diabetes that have taken the test and should be able to tell you the way they handle it. My son takes his pump off but I know other students leave theirs on.
     
  12. emm142

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    I can't imagine taking a test without my meter right in front of me. With exam stress I can easily go down to 40 or up to 300s, and I need to KNOW that, not wait until a break to find out. I always test right before an exam, and every 30-60 minutes during (unless I'm wearing the CGM, in which case I test right before to check that the CGM is accurate, and then only test again if the CGM shows a big rise / drop).

    I don't understand the system of exams or accomodations in the US. Over here all I need is a letter from the doctor confirming that I have T1D, I wear a pump and CGMS, and I need to be able to programme the pump, look at the CGMS, respond to alarms (vibrate) appropriately, check my blood sugar and eat food as needed.

    I've never taken a break from an exam because of high or low BGs (in exams the lowest I've been is 40s and the highest is 300s, and I think if I went lower than 40 or higher than 400 I wouldn't be able to perform as well), but in this country you are allowed to make up any time taken out for a "medical break" - whether you have accomodations or not. So the only accomodation I need is to be able to test and treat throughout. They actually have little stickers on our tables (the girls with D) so the invigilators realise what our meters are.

    ETA: There was one time where I had two exams scheduled at the same time, so I had to take them one after the other (1.5hrs of Philosophy followed by 1hr of Biology). I was allowed to have a 5 minute break between the exams to eat a snack, because at that time of day (post breakfast spike) my BG tends to fall really fast.
     
  13. misscaitp

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    The pump it self would fall under the accomodations of a meter. The accomodations that you are going to need are the ability to pause the test ( this is mainly used in treating blood sugar and testing since your meter is not allowed on your desk), the need of having snacks, drinks, and meter, and extended breaks. That is what I have for my diabetes accomodations on the SAT. I also have other accomodations from college board for other reasons.
     

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