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Commonly Asked Questions About Child Care and the ADA

Discussion in 'School and Daycare' started by Ellen, Jul 10, 2008.

  1. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    8,240
    Commonly Asked Questions About Child Care and the ADA

    read through the entire document..here's one example

    20. Q: What about children with diabetes? Do we have to admit them to our program? If we do, do we have to test their blood sugar levels?

    A: Generally, yes. Children with diabetes can usually be integrated into a child care program without fundamentally altering it, so they should not be excluded from the program on the basis of their diabetes. Providers should obtain written authorization from the child's parents or guardians and physician and follow their directions for simple diabetes-related care. In most instances, they will authorize the provider to monitor the child's blood sugar -- or "blood glucose" -- levels before lunch and whenever the child appears to be having certain easy-to-recognize symptoms of a low blood sugar incident. While the process may seem uncomfortable or even frightening to those unfamiliar with it, monitoring a child's blood sugar is easy to do with minimal training and takes only a minute or two. Once the caregiver has the blood sugar level, he or she must take whatever simple actions have been recommended by the child's parents or guardians and doctor, such as giving the child some fruit juice if the child's blood sugar level is low. The child's parents or guardians are responsible for providing all appropriate testing equipment, training, and special food necessary for the child.
    The Department of Justice's settlement agreements with KinderCare and La Petite Academy address this issue and others (see question 26).
     
  2. KelliTwins

    KelliTwins Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2008
    Messages:
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    I don't like how they refer to diabetes care as "easy to do with minimal training", nor do I like how they refer to the "easily recognizable signs" of lows. I'm Greg's mother, and even I don't always recognize the signs of his lows. Diabetes care is far more complicated than this answer implies.
     

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