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classroom testing and responsibilities

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by emilyblake, Sep 7, 2012.

  1. emilyblake

    emilyblake Approved members

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    My daughter is entering 3rd grade this year and we'd like her to be able to test her bg in class any time she feels low (or high) as well as prior to testing/assessments.

    For those of you whose children test in the classroom, what happens if they are low in the classroom?

    i was thinking i'd have her check herself, then if she is low treat with glucose etc. and then recheck 10-15 min later. (but notify the nurse of the BG number and what dd ate to treat - e.g. 3 tabs).

    The nurse wanted her to come to the nurse's office if she tests in class and is anything below 70. That way she can be treated, then wait for 10-15 before the nurse rechecks her. AFter her bg is up, she'd be sent back to class.

    I disagreed because that means she'd be going to the nurse 100% of the time she is low. My daughter's classroom is upstairs this year and walking to the nurse is the last thing she needs to do when she feels low.

    At the same time, I don't want to set it up so it's unsafe. I asked my daughter what she thought (in case she preferred going to the nurse). She wants to stay in the classroom.

    My goal is to keep her in class as much as possible so she isn't missing out on lessons etc.

    I'd love to hear how others are handling classroom testing and lows.

    thanks!
     
  2. Sarah Maddie's Mom

    Sarah Maddie's Mom Approved members

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  3. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

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    My daughter would test, call the nurse and together they would decide what she would have (ie. snack if it was close to that time, or some form of sugar). My daughter would eat and then the nurse would come to her to retest.
     
  4. StacyMM

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    My DD is in 3rd grade and self-manages. However, in full disclosure, she is in a classroom with other children that need a nurse so there actually is a nurse in her classroom most of the time.

    When she is below 70 or over 250, she treats (either tabs or a shot, if needed) and then tells the nurse, who calls us to let us know as we have that in her plan. We are working on getting Blue Loop set up, in which case DD can text us directly through her iPod (we use Diabetes 360 for dosing and there is a dedicated iPod in her supply bag.) That's it. If the nurse is not in the room, or if she's in a special (PE, art, etc), the teacher contacts the nurse on a walkie-talkie and lets her know. Perhaps a walkie-talkie could work in your situation? If left in her classroom, your DD could let the nurse know and if you want the nurse to manage a follow-up, she could come to the classroom in whatever time period you've requested. I agree that kids that are low should not be walking the halls - the nurse should come to her.
     
  5. Dan

    Dan Approved members

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    My son is in second grade and he checks in the classroom. We have a sliding scale for how much glucose tabs he needs. The teacher will give him the tabs and call the nurse. Since he wears a Dexcom and he can fell his lows we normally do not retest. If high the nurse will come to the classroom and bolus him via his pump. Normally in the hallways or classroom depending on if they are testing.
     
  6. coconne3

    coconne3 Approved members

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    Hi This is my daughter second year testing in the classroom. She tests before snack, call the nurse with her number and depedning on what's going on bolus' right in the classroom. She goes to the nurse for lunch and repeats above prior to going home. If she is real low someone will walk her to the nurse to eat/treat and recheck but if just borderline she just eats her snack and goes about her day. Good luck figuring out what works with you and your child
     
  7. emilyblake

    emilyblake Approved members

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    Thank you everyone, this has been so helpful!

    I appreciate that everyone's child is different and that the setup/logistics at school is different, but i really did want to know what has been working for people so thank you for sharing!
     
  8. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

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    He has a cheat sheet telling him what to do, depending on his number. If he is below 70, he is to go to the nurse. We don't retest, because we have the CGM to rely on. ETA: The MM sensor has predictive alarms, so we often treat before he is actually low, based on them.
     

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