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Class parties?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by dshull, Jun 3, 2013.

  1. dshull

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    It's the time of year with all of the end of year class parties and such which of course means carb-laden food. My 8 year old's class party is this week, and on the menu is cotton candy, water ice, soft pretzels, watermelon and strawberries. Of course the first three give me pause - so much sugar in two and so many carbs in another.

    I am usually pretty lenient with class parties and do my best to dose and move on, but both water ice and cotton candy are just straight sugar. My son is VERY sensitive to looking different than the other kids and feeling left out. I looked into no sugar added water ice, which is only 6 carbs less than regular, so seemed kind of pointless.

    What do you all do in these types of situations? I will be at the party to help out and dose insulin.

    I am not interested in starting or participating in a debate about the merits of this kind of food at school parties - I know lots of people have strong feelings about this. I am just interested in what other parents would do when faced with this kind of food at a party.

    Thanks in advance for your help!
     
  2. cdninct

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    K is not in grade school yet, and we have not had to face the class party, so I don't have a lot of advice to give. I did want to mention that cotton candy, while pure sugar, is not actually that high in carb. My son had it for the first time on Memorial Day, and a large bunch had surprisingly few carbs in it (I can't remember the number, though--sorry). If it is prepackaged it will be denser and higher in carb, but if there is a machine, it is really not as bad as it looks.
     
  3. mamattorney

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    I'm no expert, so I hesitate to respond to threads like these because there is so much that I haven't experienced, but I would just dose him for what he eats and let him eat it all. That's what insulin is for. If he is high in a few hours, just correct him.
     
  4. shannong

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    I would just look up the carb. counts on these foods and dose for it. You may want to pre-bolus by more time for those things that spike the blood sugar quickly, like cotton candy and ices (snow cones?). It's straight sugar syrup they pour on those snow cones, it can be hard to judge just how much gets poured on top. Perhaps you could bring a tablespoon or something to actually measure it. My son went to a fair last summer and asked for a "mix" of flavours. This resulted in a TON of syrup being poured on his. Needless to say, he went super high afterwards, but we corrected and moved on.

    Have fun!
     
  5. Beach bum

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    We went from elementary school where there was a strict health policy in place. Class parties were to consist of cheese, crackers, veggies, fruit and one sweet treat. Made my life and the nurses so easy those last few years (prior it was a party practically every week) to middle school where they don't follow the policy at all, so it's back to the guessing games again. Now my daughter is older and we talk about making a wise choice (ie. if you are going to have cotton candy and you want an Italian Ice, think about it. Maybe do half of each) and overall it seems to work. LOL, she literally just came home saying they are having pizza and ice cream on Friday:D

    I have to say what is being served is over the top. I pity the school nurse because the combo of lots of sweets and warm weather makes for lots of kids with tummy aches! But, I would talk to your son about it. Don't make it about diabetes, make it about making a smart choice so he doesn't feel ill. Maybe try and convince him to go with a little bit of each of the "fun" stuff and more of the good stuff. It's just one day in many in his life, let him enjoy the moment. Bolus, acknowledge and move on. Tomorrow is a new day.
     
  6. caspi

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    You don't want a debate so I will keep my mouth shut about the food choices. ;) Just dose and move on. It's one day (thankfully!) and be prepared for some whacky numbers, which may or may not happen. :)
     
  7. KatieSue

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    Even if my child weren't diabetic I think I'd try to limit it a little. Like one cotton candy and one ice. If you want more then you need to eat something a little better in between. So not saying no just not so much all at once.
     
  8. SandiT

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    I'd let her have SOME. The reason is because she's super sensitive to being "different". However, she'd have a limit, and I'd explain it to her the way I do with a lot of other things, "That stuff isn't good for anybody. It has nothing to do with diabetes, you can't have that much of that stuff because you're a human being!"

    I want to protect her from everything bad in life. But I always hear that a lot of people, as they lay dying, state that what they regret most isn't the things they did (you work through those regrets along the way, hopefully), but the things you didn't do.

    I couldn't protect her from D, but I can do everything in my power to balance giving her a happy life while on it with extending that lifetime as much as possible within reason.

    A life that feels like suffering isn't a good life, and who wants to prolong that? A life that feels like deprivation and isolation isn't a good life, and who wants to prolong that, either?

    So in essence, what I'm saying is that I hope to balance "yes, you can have A LITTLE now and again" so that I don't extend an intolerable life by a few days, even a few years... and all for what? The want of a bit of sweets.

    I don't know, I'm probably not saying this well. Perhaps having a bit of sweets will make it a tiny bit shorter of a lifetime. But it'll be a happier lifetime, one worth living. Where depriving may leave my daughter feeling like life just isn't worth it and it's an unhappy world filled with suffering and bitterness.

    Besides, the lower stress levels are good for your health, right? :cool:



    EDIT: And you can't really control what they're offering, so you need to make this decision for the emotional and physical health of your child. Kira also is extremely sensitive to this issue, and when your child says something like, "I would rather be dead than have diabetes" because she's THAT miserable over being "different", it makes possibly (because we just don't know--life's unpredictable) a few more hours at the end seem less important. What if she never gets to the end because she feels so miserably different and alone?

    Let him have some of each, but point out that you're limiting it because sugar's bad for EVERYBODY. I'd even tell Kira sometimes, "I'm not diabetic, and I won't eat that! That's a terribly unhealthy choice! You can have 1/2 a cup of that, and 1/2 a cup of that, just like I would have if I decided I wanted some. That's enough for anybody."

    When she points to someone else and says, "he's eating the whole thing," I say, "well, I'm not his parent. If I was his parent, he wouldn't be, but that's not MY choice since I'm not HIS mommy."
     
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2013
  9. hawkeyegirl

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    Yep. I'd dose for it and move on. It's one day in their lives, and personally, I think it's more important that they not stand out from their friends than it is to have great BG control that day. Around here, at least, no parent of a non-D kid would be there to limit what they ate for general health reasons, so even my 9 year old would know it was BS if I tried to tell him that I was limiting him because "that much sugar isn't good for anyone." ;) I mean really, if you didn't do that sort of thing pre-diagnosis and you don't do that sort of limiting with your non-D kids, I wouldn't do it now.
     
  10. SandiT

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    That's true.

    I did it pre-diagnosis and have no other kids, so I guess I just didn't think anyone would be doing it differently for siblings or before diagnosis. Glad someone pointed it out cause I didn't think of it at all!
     
  11. tammy82

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    I usually just let my daughter have what she wants and bolus for it. Afterwards just keep a close eye and check often. I dont want my daughter to feel different from the other kids and want her to be a normal girl. One day is not going to change anything. Just look up the carbs beforehand with the Calorie King so you have an idea.
     
  12. Debdebdebby13

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    I just let her eat what she will eat and follow her giving insulin as needed. Then of course we manage the highs/lows that follow at home. It's more important to me for her to fully participate and feel like everyone else than to worry what an afternoon of straight sugar is going to do to her.

    I'm guessing as she gets older and realizes that some things she eats make her feel bad afterwards she will start policing herself, but as of now she never says she doesn't feel good after eating so in those situations I just let it go.

    Also, I try to follow a sugar/carb filled fun day at school with a very healthy, possibly low-ish carb meal at home, just to try to even things out.
     
  13. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    The pretzel is the big pita on that list, imho. Those things can be huge and might as well be bagels in terms of their bg raising power. Cotton candy has far fewer carbs than you would think - I wouldn't even cover it if there's to be games or any running around.
     
  14. dshull

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    Thanks so much for all of your replies! I at first was leaning toward telling my son to pick one treat at the party, which is guaranteed to get a less than enthusiastic response from him. I began to rethink that after reading your encouragement.

    Yesterday we had our quarterly endo visit. I brought up the party, and the universal advice was let him enjoy the party, eat the food, dose and move on. Our discharge papers even had written on them "Enjoy class party treats this week!" The NP felt that the most important thing was to feel like a normal kid and to enjoy the end of the school year.

    So I feel so much better and am really looking forward to the party. Thanks again!
     
  15. caspi

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    Love this! :)
     
  16. 3kidlets

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    I would just let Hana have whatever was being served. Actually, I've found that foods like cotton candy and soda require less insulin than what I would anticipate.
     

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