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Cheerleading parents/disconnected for 1.5-3hrs???

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by mmgirls, Oct 13, 2011.

  1. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

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    OK so cheerleading 3-4 days a week and then dance days included have brought her A1C from 6.9 to 8.1.

    I am starting to get a handle of it but have been slower because I am not the one with her most of the time. Since I am in school too!!!

    I really don't get it! She does not seem to be any more active, but it is disconnected longer than we have done before.

    Today was perfect against my better judgement I fully bolused her allot of carbs right before practice, and it worked out perfectly!!!


    She seems to need allot of insulin during and right after cheer, but I have ben too scared of a low because of the stunts portion where my dd is the "base".

    Is this normal, to let your DD or DS run higher because of the threat of a low and others involved?
     
  2. Amy C.

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    My son is not a cheerleader, but I would go with the evidence of the A1c and the blood sugar readings. You tried running her higher which prevented the lows, but resulted in more highs. It is time to tweak and allow her to have more insulin. The pendulum swung too far in one direction and you should work to bring it back.
     
  3. emm142

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    She needs to be high enough during cheerleading that the other kids are safe. But an 8.1 a1C correlates to an average BG in the low 200s. I can see that running her in the low 200s during the exercise is fine, but I'd try to lower the average at other times of day, since she isn't cheerleading all the time.
     
  4. hawkeyegirl

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    It would be an enormous mess for us if Jack was disconnected 1.5-3 hours. He just finished a full season of tackle football, and he wore his pump for every practice and game. If it's not possible for your daughter to wear her pump during practice, I'd probably look into buying an Omnipod out of pocket. We've come to the realization that Jack simply cannot be disconnected for more than an hour without everything going nuts.

    I suppose another option would be doing some partial basal with Lantus.
     
  5. alismom

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    I coach cheerleading and have my own daughter (omnipod) and another cheerleader(minimed) on the team. Both are bases and neither ever disconnect or remove their pump. Both do a temp basal about an hour and a half before practice begins. We are a competitive varsity team and have never had a problem with their pumps.
     
  6. Helenmomofsporty13yearold

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    I learned from Dr. Michael Riddell (http://www.yorku.ca/mriddell/cv.htm) at the CWD conference in Toronto that athletic children can have an A1C a full point higher than non-athletic ones and achieve the same long-term complications risk. I was so amazed to learn this (and relieved!) as it seems their bodies provide this extra long-term risk protection while allowing short-term risk protection from the lows of exercise. Also, I have never read that a 8.1 A1C is not acceptable for your child's age group.

    "According to the American Diabetes Association, doctors should consider your child's age when setting goals for her A1c readings. The ADA says children under 6 years old who have diabetes should have an A1c goal of 7.5 percent to 8.5 percent. Six- to 12-year-olds should aim for A1c values under 8 percent, and 13- to 19-year-olds should stay under 7.5 percent."

    I say your are doing fine, don't sweat it. Your child is doing something she loves and you are keeping her (and the girls she's holding up) safe doing it. IMO there is nothing worse than a child sitting on the sidelines nursing a low and missing out on the fun and even more so if the rest of the crew must wait for her.

    Sports are very hard to fine tune in kids. I think it will be easier when they are adults. We usually aim for a 150(8) to start an activity and check every 1/2 hour. It all works out best for us when there are no boluses on board as DD is crazy sensitive to boluses while exercising.

    With you at school right now and not there to monitor changes, I think the side of caution is the winning one and you are doing a great job.

    Goooooooo McKenna!!!!!
     
  7. mmgirls

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    I was planning on getting Lantus into the mix but the talk of a "shot" backfired and has made a mess of regular site changed. We are slowly working towards uneventfull site changes, but I have always allowed my DD to be diconnected for dance and I did not give it a thought at the beginning of cheer, and it has been hard to deal with.

    November 6th is her compeitition and am hopeing that someone comes out with a intergrated pump/cgm before we start again next year. (dexcom)
     
  8. Beach bum

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    My daughter has now reached the point in her life where even an hour off the pump really shakes things up. For our summer activities which are water based, we go untethered with Levimere, and make up for it's weakness at the end by going back on the pump with smaller basal. Worked really well for us and was so much better than doing catch up all night. For her activities of dance, track and skiing, she uses a waist-it which will keep the pump close and secure against her body. As for worrying about lows, we see how the first two sessions go and then will usually need to give her a free snack uncovered prior. This will usually be a small bowl of cereal or pbj sandwich. This way she will not go low, and if she spikes, basal usually takes care of it.
     
  9. Tigerlilly's mom

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    To answer your question...no, it's not normal to run your child higher on more than a rare occasion.:cwds:

    There are many options to keep your child's numbers in safe range while they are doing physical activities, it may take a combination of options to work for some.

    Although my son did not initially want to have that one shot of lantus a day, he choose having that one shot over wearing his pump 24/7.

    Disconnecting was not doing him any good when his numbers crept up doing sports practices and games. Unfortunately running high impacts his performance as much as going low does:mad:

    It may take lots of trial and error, but I am sure that you will find a good solution for your daughter.:cwds:
     
  10. hawkeyegirl

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    I sympathize. Jack would go ape$hit if we tried to give him a shot at this point. I'd do it if we had to, but it wouldn't be pretty.

    How would she feel about a Pod occasionally? Omnipod has that crazy "cut the cord" program where the PDM is super cheap ($150? $200?) and then your insurance companies cover pods just like they cover infusion sets. I'm intrigued by that.
     
  11. mmgirls

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    I am totally wanting to try the omnipod but want to hold out until the smaller one is avaiable.

    I would love for the "Solo" to actually make it to market.http://www.solo4you.com/
     
  12. hawkeyegirl

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    Me too. I don't think Jack would be very excited about the size of the current Pod, but I might be able to convince him to try a smaller one. He won't be able to wear his tubed pump many more years during football, and so he's either going to have to choose between wearing a Pod during the season or a shot of Lantus.
     
  13. MomofSweetOne

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    Our Medtronic rep said they've got a cordless pump in the works but will also continue to make the tethered pumps. So, there may be more options in the future...if they can make it through the FDA. :eek:
     
  14. dqmomof3

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    We did MM for 3.5 years, and then we made the switch to Omnipod with the Cut the Cord promotion. I think we paid $199 for the PDM, and then we have insurance that picks up the pods just like it picked up the MM supplies.

    Jayden was a cheerleader as well, and she would go a length of time without basal because of that. I didn't see it as a really big deal...we just corrected when we needed to and chased numbers all night!

    Now, though...I would never go back! Her numbers with the Omnipod are soooooo much better than they were, and it's because she gets BASAL all the time now. We aren't crazy about the size of the pod, but it's a small price to pay for the good numbers.
     
  15. rutgers1

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    Matt's Medtronic pump arrived today. I was always under the impression that he would just take it off during football, swimming, etc. I can't imagine it being worn during a football game.

    When people say that they give a shot of Lantus, is that in place of the background insulin from the pump, or just an addition? Can someone explain that a bit more? Thanks!
     
  16. nanhsot

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    My son takes his pump off, leaves it in his sports bag within fairly easy reach should he need to reconnect at half or whatever. I actually am not sure if he's done that or not. He does NOT stay connected at all during any practice or games, well, sometimes if it's a no hitting/tackle practice with conditioning only he may leave it in, but that's rare. He is usually disconnected 2+ hours every day for practice, 4 days a week, then games are 2.5 hours or so.

    We added just a tiny bit (2 units) of lantus as a background during football season. The bulk (23ish units) of his basal comes from the pump. We have found that lantus just works well in him and adding this has really made his night a bit more level, but it's not really enough to make a huge difference, it's honestly an experiment at this point! We somewhat randomly came up with 2 units, 1 per hour missed, but of course due to the slow release nature it's not an even exchange but it seems to be working well.

    There are some who replace more of the basal with lantus, there are some who go untethered which means they use the pump for bolus and lantus for basal. My son has a strong dawn phenom so having night time basal via pump is essential. His night time needs are double his daytime needs, so relying on lantus alone is tough.

    We rather randomly chose the 2 units of lantus to give him just a bit of coverage since he does disconnect rather frequently (2 hours a day, more or less)...with his CDE knowledge of course. (ok, it was more of an ask forgiveness than permission).
     
  17. Ali

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    Re Lantus. You take some of your pumps basal delivery as a shot of lantus. This can help compensate for disconnects from the pump, irregular absorption from the pump site, bubbles, etc. You work with your Dr. to figure out how to set it up. Ali
     
  18. mmgirls

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    I guess next year we will have to fidure out a new way to hold her pump and try to keep it on her at all times. Right now she has her pump in a pcket sewn between her shoulder blades on her tank tops. With it there she can not "tumble". Maybe a pocket on the side of her tank top sort of where the elbow lays against the body. Practice is not so bad but games are a killer.

    Game days are just so different and then an away game just adds to the issues.

    I am sure I wil figure it all out by the last game.
     
  19. Beach bum

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  20. emilyblake

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    Hi, I know you posted this a week or 2 ago, but I thought I'd reply anyway.

    My 7.5 year old is a cheerleader for the 2nd year in a row and we never disconnect her. She wears the Omnipod [and a Dexcom]. Her blood sugar would be very high if we disconnected her for > 1 hour. We do check her immediately before a game or practice and try to let her have something that is not too filling but offers some good protein/carb combination.

    Of course she's 7 so it doesn't always go as planned, but we haven't had any lows during cheer this year (and we cheered for football and did a competition 2 weeks ago).

    Of course, I don't leave her side during practie or games and not having tubes probably makes this slightly easier.

    Good luck to you!
     

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