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CGM users: How often do you have "no alarm" nights?

Discussion in 'Stickies' started by mom2ejca, Jan 30, 2010.

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CGM users: How often do you have "no alarm" nights?

Poll closed Feb 1, 2010.
  1. Never

    4 vote(s)
    13.3%
  2. 1-2 times per week

    13 vote(s)
    43.3%
  3. 3-4 times per week

    9 vote(s)
    30.0%
  4. 5-6 times per week

    4 vote(s)
    13.3%
  5. Every night

    0 vote(s)
    0.0%
  1. mom2ejca

    mom2ejca Approved members

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    I realize that it varies from week to week, but I'm really just looking for an average. Also, vote based on what you consider a "no alarm" night, for me that would be from my bedtime to my wake-up time.
     
  2. joy orz

    joy orz Approved members

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    To dream the impossible dream...:p
    But I have to say that Ava's numbers have always been a mess overnight. Both on MDI and pumping. So now, I can at least sleep in between the alarms, rather than waiting up all night for the next time to do a finger check.

    Also, you can change the range at night. Last night she went up a bit, I did a correction and went back to sleep, because I had tightened the setting to alarm me if the correction didn't work, or if I over corrected. Without the CGM, I'd be up all night watching the correction.
     
  3. BrendaK

    BrendaK Neonatal Diabetes Registry

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    Carson's been on the Navigator just about 24/7 for 9 months and we are FINALLY getting a lot of no alarm nights. Blood sugars at night are generally totally flat. I would say 4 or 5 out of 7 nights are no alarm which is a HUGE change from when we started CGMS.
     
  4. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

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    It goes in spurts. Lately, lots of alarms at night. Sometimes, it's very rare to have alarms at night. But he has an ear infection right now and nights are a mess. I'd say if you average it all out, we go without alarms about half the time at night.

    When the new MM pump comes out, we'll be able to set different alarm thresholds for different times of the day. When that comes out, we'll probably have more alarms, as I'll set nights for 130. Right now I don't change the high threshold at night, because I'll forget to change it back in the morning, and he'll alarm all day at school.
     
  5. mph

    mph Approved members

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    There wasn't a "next to never";).

    It really does go in spurts. Some nights we get one alarm and other times we get a ton of alarms (tight range). Occassionally, no alarms (wider range).

    It depends on activity, illness, fatty food, growth spurts, etc............:rolleyes:

    The CGMS allows me to sleep BETTER/DEEPER/MORE SOUNDLY between the alarms because I know it will catch a problem.:cwds:

    ABSOLUTELY worth it!!!!!!!!!!!!:)
     
  6. selketine

    selketine Approved members

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    I agree that it goes in spurts. We can often get 3-4 nights a week - if the is otherwise stable - which means not sick, we know the carb counts for the food (not on vacation, etc), and he isn't exercising more than usual.

    Of course your question is not asking what we all set our high alarms to - which could mean that a person with a high alarm of 170 is waking up a lot more than a person with a high alarm of 200 or 220, etc.;) If the high alarms are the problem - I would set them higher to start - for the overnight - and gradually work your way down as your child stays more in range for night times. There is no sense starting out with a high alarm on the low end as you'll drive yourself crazy.
     
  7. Toni

    Toni Banned

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    We have no alarms almost every night at the point we go to bed (she will roll over on sensor and Dex will revert to ??? the rest of the night). Alarms still good if we roll her over, and we go in to check 12midnight and 2am and 3:30am or just 12 and 2:30am most nights.
     
  8. mom2ejca

    mom2ejca Approved members

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    I had considered that, and it is relevant to the number of alarms you would have at night. But, it's irrelevant to the main reason I was asking the question. I get slammed every endo app't because of our night testing. Before the CGM because I chose to night test, and now with the CGM because apparently we have too many night alarms. It's really starting to make me :mad:. I was asking in direct reference to the claim that "it should be rare to have night alarms."

    Apparently, with the CGM we are suppose to be able to watch for the trends over a 2 week period and magically set the basal so that we rarely have alarms:rolleyes:. I was given the impression that most people don't have as many alarms as we do. I suspect that our endo's office has a much smaller sample of cgm users than we do here at CWD. So, I was curious if we were, in fact, unusual in the amount of alarms we respond to at night.

    FWIW, I'm not complaining about the number of alarms we have at night, and I have no intention of changing our settings. The alarms really don't bother me, I get up, do what I need to, and go back to sleep.
     
  9. mph

    mph Approved members

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    This is very important. We all need to be satisfied with the # of alarms we are getting. If not.....the tool is not being used to our benefit:cwds:.

    If your goal is a tight bg range with little deviation, then expect alarms. If your goal is to be able to sleep through the night soundly, then you may need a wider range some nights.;)
     
  10. joy orz

    joy orz Approved members

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    Jessica, this should make you feel better. I really love Ava's endo. She's type 1 herself, diagnosed at age 4. Whenever Ava's numbers go wonky and I ask her to come up with a magical solution, she just looks at me with that look :rolleyes: and says... "This is what D is. Give carbs or a correction and move on."

    Ava's numbers are hard to manage overnight. The CGM isn't going to change that, but it is going to give me piece of mind that if I do fall asleep, the alarm will wake me up for a low.

    Some kids may have nice flat basal needs overnight, but mine sure isn't one of them. Sounds like your's isn't either. You should ABSOLUTELY not be made to feel bad for checking, or taking action for an alarm. And if there is some magical formula to come with, why hasn't your endo come up with it? Hmmm? Isn't that what medical school was for?

    (Ok, snarky response over... I'm a bit sleep deprived from responding to alarms all night. :eek:)
     
  11. sarahspins

    sarahspins Approved members

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    I rarely alarm for any lows.. highs are another issue, but if I'm not having trouble before, bedtime, nights are usually reasonably stable.

    It also depends on "what" I set my high alarm too... lately I've been leaving it at 280, because occasionally I'll spike up above 200 and I do come back down.. I'm still tweaking my basals... at this "stage" I would rather not wake up and correct it, because I want to see how to plays out so I can figure out what to do to fix it.

    I know from experience that if I top 300 at night now, it's almost always a bad site or the cannula came out, something like that.. so having the alarm "on" is good, I just set it higher.
     
  12. emm142

    emm142 Approved members

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    If I am wearing the CGM "full time" (ie. for a month or so straight) I can get to usually about 5 "no alarm" nights a week.
     
  13. selketine

    selketine Approved members

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    Well....if you set you alarm higher (which I realize you don't want to do) - then in theory the endo would be happier because you'll have fewer night alarms.

    You should have titled you thread "how to magically set basal settings so cgms won't alarm overnight and child stays in perfect range" if that is the answer you REALLY wanted.;)

    When William first started the cgms I was up constantly every night. Getting him in target was like landing an jumbo jet on a postage stamp - as I like to say - it just seemed impossible. Only during the summer when he was off from school and I could stay up late and sleep late did I really learn how to tweak him going into bedtime so that he was in a good range. His basals really were not the problem - it was getting the right I:C ratio and guessing the right combo ratio for nights he needed combos - much more likely for dinner than any other meal.

    I think the other issue is that if I TRUST the current sensor - I don't always test for a high. This depends on numerous factors (how high, what the trend arrow is, what he ate, IOB, etc) - and I will bolus based on the cgms. This is not recommend of course - but it does cut down on the night time testing. I always test for lows. I'm very pro-active with the trend arrows and will try to catch future highs or lows by tweaking his combo bolus if one is running, or turning off the basal, etc.

    So night alarms will not always = bg test. I think I might not be alone in this.....
     
  14. Nancy in VA

    Nancy in VA Approved members

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    We can often go 5 nights a week without an overnight alarm. We had 2-3 days this week when she started going up overnight and that was new, so I'm now tweaking and still getting a little bit of one.

    I had to tell my husband that the CGMS alarm isn't a SNOOZE alarm. It went off at 5:30 this morning and all he did was mute the alarms for an hour. He said, "but it was only 165". I told him that's what it is set at so I can stop her BEFORE she gets to 250, which is what she was when I realized he hadn't gotten up to test her.
     
  15. s0ccerfreak

    s0ccerfreak Approved members

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    I had to laugh at that. I often turn mine off at night without even noticing I've done so; I hate for it to wake my roommate up. Sometimes I look at it and decide "I'm 80 or 175 and feel fine, i don't want to get out of my covers so i do nothing about it." I know not good
     
  16. Flutterby

    Flutterby Approved members

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    I see nothing wrong with night time testing. If it makes you feel better, do it.. If it doesn't bother you, do it.. To bad if your endo doesn't like it.;)
     
  17. Connie(BC)Type 1

    Connie(BC)Type 1 Approved members

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    I shut the high alarms off at night, I need my sleep
     
  18. Nancy in VA

    Nancy in VA Approved members

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    I'm sure the Endo didn't handle it right, but in many cases, you can use the trends you see in the CGMS to set your basals so that you can stay flat. We were doing a good job and she was staying flat most nights and then she started creeping up, so we're getting the alarms again. But I do think that a good benefit of the CGMS is that you should be able to get some pretty flat readings for a long period of no eating
     
  19. ecs1516

    ecs1516 Approved members

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    Since I have two children on CGMs this scews my answer. If I was voting for one child I would say 5 nights no alarms.
     
  20. TripleThreat

    TripleThreat Approved members

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    I second that there are 4 type 1s on CGMS so there is an alarm almost every night, but i would guess they wait at least 4 days before alarming again.
     

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