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CGM and Lantus

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Britchica, Aug 6, 2009.

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  1. Britchica

    Britchica Approved members

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    Since my child was dx just 3 weeks ago i know i know nothing. Whatever information I've taken in in the last few weeks is going through the filter of a sleepless, emotion-wracked brain. But two things keep rising to the surface and I keep asking the nurses at our hospital about it only to be met with a no.

    1) Seems Lantus is a better insulin than NPH with no peak. Granted my son is in a major honeymoon on just 2 units of NPH at breakfast (he's 18Kg/401bs). But, he has crashes into the 60s once a day between meals. Would Lantus help with that?

    2) Seems as if a lot of people her use CGM and JDRF advocates its use. But our doc will only write orders for a CGM for non-compliant patients. Are you all covering it OOP? We're happy to, but the nurse claims it's "overkill" and makes patients more nervous.

    Will dealing with the big D always be this frustrating and confusing? HELP!!
     
  2. hawkeyegirl

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    It could. We had a lot better control on Lantus than on NPH, and the vast majority of posters here prefer the freedom of Lantus. There's no reason not to give it a try, and no reason for your endo not to prescribe it for you.

    Seriously, I do not know what these doctors (and nurses) are smoking sometimes. A CGM for a "noncompliant" (whatever the hell that means) patient is downright funny. If a patient is noncompliant, a CGM will do them about as much good as giving them a tinfoil hat. If your endo had said, "Let's wait a few weeks while you adjust to diagnosis, that's one thing, but only prescribing them to "noncompliant" patients? Ridiculous.

    If you want a CGM, your endo should prescribe a CGM. We love ours, and it is absolutely invaluable in our regimen. I don't say this often, but in your shoes, I'd start looking for a different endo.

    It will get better! I won't say that it ever gets easy, but you will learn so much in the next year or so. Don't worry about what you don't know right now. Take it slow and steady - read some books, read thread on this forum, ask questions when you don't understand something. You will get there, I promise! :)
     
  3. emm142

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    Almost spat out my water. Too true.

    Lantus worked better or me than what I tried before, which was premix. I think mixing it yourself is better than that, but for most people does not seem to be ideal.

    I've been trying the CGM for 3 days. It's working fantastically. I love it. I'd recommend doing a trial to see what you think.
     
  4. Christopher

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    There are several people on this forum that use NPH and like it (Wilf, for example). But I agree that there is nothing wrong with trying Lantus and seeing how it works for your son. Danielle has been on Lantus since dx and I really think it works well for her. You are in the very early stages of this journey and as time goes on you will become much more comfortable dealing with all the things you need to do in order to manage this illness, so in that respect, it does get better. As for the CGM, unless your son is having wild swings in bg levels and his numbers are just out of control my opinion would be to wait a little bit, get used to all the daily things you need to do, injections, counting carbs, doing corrections, etc. I don't know how old your son is, but have you asked him how he would feel about having something attached to him? If you are testing him on a regular basis throughout the day and night hopefully you are catching any major bg swings. Just my 2 cents.

    (Just to be clear, I am not anti-CGM, I just think that it may be a little too much to deal with in the first weeks after dx, in addition to all the other emotions, daily tasks, school, etc... I guess it really depends on the parent, the child and the family situation.)
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2009
  5. hawkeyegirl

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    Totally agree. My beef is not that they wouldn't give her one right away, but the reason for not giving her one - just bizarre!
     
  6. ShanaB

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    For us Lantus didn't work well. It isn't supposed to peak but was causing night time lows and that was on 1 unit (keep in mind we were dealing with a 10-month old). We switched to NPH and although it still wasn't ideal it was easier for us to manage. We are now on the pump which was our ideal solution but my advice to you is to find a solution that works. So if you've tweaked the NPH dosage with the help of your endo team and it isn't working for you then no harm in asking for a switch. You'll find very quickly with this disease that what works for one kid may not work for another, you will have to find what works for you.

    And, just wanted to add in the first few weeks this forum was a blessing but also a curse. I read too much and got overwhelmed and scared. I'm certainly not saying that you shouldn't read everything you can get your hands on but just go easy on yourself if the information is overwhelming. I remember thinking I would never 'get it' and here we are 4 months in and I am proud to say I now understand what all these posts are talking about. Don't worry, it does get easier!
     
  7. wilf

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    If your son is honeymooning as strongly as you say he is, then NPH may well be a good fit just now. It is simple and straightforward to administer, and can have a positive effect for a honeymooning child.

    Time enough to research the fancier and newer insulins and technologies later, when the NPH isn't doing the job any longer. As long as it's working, why change anything? :cwds:

    Note that 60s is not a BG level that is a cause for worry, as long as levels don't go any lower.
     
  8. Britchica

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    Thanks!! I have learned so much by visiting these forums, but it is overwhelming and scary.
     
  9. Britchica

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    Thanks. My son is 3. I don't even really know what wild swings would be. Our medical team says his up and downs are normal at this stage. He's had a daytime low (50s, 60s) almost every day since dx and at least two highs per day (200's/low 300s). We check at least 7 x day. The scary thing is, he really doesn't show any obvious symptoms of a low. I just somehow sense he needs to be checked. Maybe they're subtle symptoms....
     
  10. Heather(CA)

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    Yes, Lantus would probably help with the lows between meals. Quick question, are you giving him a snack between meals? Like around 10am and 3pm? We always did while on NPH. If your not, that could be your problem.

    If you are giving snacks, the NPH needs to be lowered...:cwds:
     

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